‘Pagosa Country’: Some things haven’t changed

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Photo courtesy John M. Motter We see here Byrne’s hack, as described in an 1890 poem printed in the Pagosa Springs News. The coach is parked at the Halfway House in today’s Halfway Canyon, where fresh teams were harnessed and a weary “Hack” rider could get a meal and bed.
Photo courtesy John M. Motter
We see here Byrne’s hack, as described in an 1890 poem printed in the Pagosa Springs News. The coach is parked at the Halfway House in today’s Halfway Canyon, where fresh teams were harnessed and a weary “Hack” rider could get a meal and bed.

During earlier days when Pagosa Country was but a babe, the culture was much different.

On celebrations such as Fourth of July, men with reputations for giving moving speeches spoke at public gatherings. Others with writing skills published their work in the local newspapers. Clubs and meetings were organized promoting these skills. Consequently, many poems appeared in the local newspaper. Following is a poem published by an anonymous writer in the Dec. 11, 1890, Pagosa Springs News. As you read, you’ll notice some things haven’t changed.

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