Chromo man takes part in humanitarian mission

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Photo courtesy David Shear Carol and David Shear pose with some of the youngest members of their family.
Photo courtesy David Shear
Carol and David Shear pose with some of the youngest members of their family.

Imagine hundreds of people lined up, politely waiting for what many in the U.S. would consider to be basic health care and basic services — general surgery, opthalmology, dentistry, veterinary care (such as spaying and neutering), among others.

Imagine that, in a matter of just over a week, most of those people will have been tended to, treated and on the mend.

Too, their communities will have benefited from pointed education in health care and other fields, as well as engineering and building projects to better the community.

And to top if off, that country’s relations with the United States are now better than before.

That service is just what the U.S. Navy ship Comfort provides, with the help of several branches of the military, partner nations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) as part of the Project Hope — Continuing Promise mission.

“I think it’s something people should know, what our country does,” said Dr. David Shear, who served as a surgeon with Continuing Promise for about a month recently.

 

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