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Pagosa Springs
Wednesday, May 18, 2022

‘Howdy, neighbor’: a changing routine

Have you ever been confronted by a friendly “Howdy, old-timer” from someone you met in a public place, maybe the supermarket? Used to be when...

The Sheepmen’s/Cattlemen’s War continues

Last week, we started telling of the Montoya/Howe Sheepmen’s/Cattlemen’s War. William Howe was a young cattle rancher who homesteaded along the west fork of the...

Pagosa’s Past: Pagosa Country pioneers

By John M. Motter PREVIEW Columnist One of the most interesting Pagosa Country pioneer family histories describes how a persevering woman overcame what, to many, would...

Recollections: Pagosa Country in the late 1800s

We’ve been writing from the recollections of C.W. “Will” Price, who came to Pagosa Springs with his family as a teenager in 1879. Will...

Man, beast received short rations in winter of 1878

Construction of Fort Lewis in Pagosa Springs began with the arrival of the first troops in October 1878. A special Pagosa winter arrived soon...

Pagosa pioneers: Where were they from?

Ora Sewell was born Dec. 28, 1877, in Gunnison, Colo. She married George Hallett in 1897 in Pagosa Springs. He died in 1923. In...

Traversing Wolf Creek Pass with a liquored-up wagon train master

We continue with a first-person account of the first crossing of Wolf Creek Pass in 1916, the year it opened. The group we are talking...

Brutal winter made travel, correspondence difficult

U.S. Army units consisting of elements of B Company of the 15th Infantry and Company D, 9th Cavalry spent the winter of 1878 at...

Elections, allegations, mobs and mayhem

Charles D. Scase was one of the earliest settlers in Pagosa Springs. He had been born Sept. 24, 1846, near Albany, N.Y., and moved to...

An indictment for riot and a dismissal of charges

We wrote last week about the friction between Anglos and Hispanics for control of the government of newly formed Archuleta County. When the first...