April 13, 2006
Front Page

Older buildings spared ... for now

Following passage of an emergency town ordinance, buildings 50 years and older will be spared from the bulldozer's blade — at least temporarily.

The ordinance, recommended by the town's Historic Preservation Board and approved unanimously by the Pagosa Springs Town Council during their April 5 meeting, follows in the wake of a number of recent downtown demolitions which have drawn strong public outcry and caused the town's Historic Preservation Board to act.

According to Shari Pierce, chair of the Historic Preservation Board, all but one of the eight downtown-area demolitions — four of which occurred on the east end of U.S. 160 — occurred to buildings deemed by the board to have historic significance, and included homes and businesses of several of Pagosa's past prominent citizens. In many cases, the lots remain razed and vacant and lack development plans detailing the structures that will take the original buildings' place.

"The board would have liked to work with the property owners to prevent demolition through encouraging rehabilitation, reuse or restoration," said Town Planner Tamra Allen.

As written, the ordinance temporarily suspends "authorizations and permits for demolition, alteration, removal or construction of modifications to buildings 50 years old or older."

Although the ordinance is firm in its mandate, it does allow room for an exemption from the moratorium on a case-by-case basis.

In the ordinance, if a property owner thinks their property and project warrant an exemption, the ordinance allows the Historic Preservation Board to review the property. If the board deems the property to have "no historic significance," the board will recommend the town council issue an exemption from the temporary suspension imposed by the ordinance.

According to the document, the moratorium will last for one year, in which time the preservation board and town staff are directed to craft recommendations for a long-term, historic building policy that can be integrated into the town's municipal code. Those recommendations, once completed, will then be put before the town council for an approval or denial.

Although the Pagosa Springs Town Council and the Historic Preservation Board unanimously supported the ordinance, the moratorium was not without its critics.

John Hundley, speaking on behalf of BootJack Management Company in a letter to the town council, stated opposition to the ordinance, calling it a one-sided solution.

In the letter Hundley states, "... we must also state that Ordinance 666 as written tips the scales too far one direction — favoring the past — and casts shadows on the vision of a thriving downtown economy. There needs to be a more detailed and balanced approach. We want to promote, and help create, a 'win-win' scenario for the town, present and future, but this will not occur by excluding Pagosa's land owners and developers by way of closed door collaborations."

BootJack management is responsible for many of the eight recent demolitions that have occurred in the Town of Pagosa Springs during the past year.

Susan Ward, a member of the Historic Preservation Board, and a developer who has rehabilitated two buildings in the downtown area, challenged Hundley's assertions and called into question BootJack's practice of demolishing a structure and then leaving the land bare without a development plan in place.

Ward said the vacant lots in downtown Pagosa Springs on east U.S. 160 sent the wrong message to Pagosa visitors

Speaking to the council, Ward said, "Tearing down buildings and letting the land lie fallow doesn't do anyone any favors," Ward said.

Ward added that many of the recently demolished properties were purchased at drastically inflated prices which in turn had driven up neighboring property values and resulted in increased property taxes which some local business owners were having difficulty paying.

In her presentation to the council, Ward acknowledged Hundley's statement "that there is a delicate balance to be struck to preserve the structures of the past while building toward the vision of a vibrant social and economic future," yet she added there was also a balance to be struck between maintaining a property owner's right and a developer's inherent responsibility to the community.

"There is a fine line between property rights and developer rights; and there is a fine line between developer rights and protecting the integrity of the community," Ward said.

Upon the council's approval, the moratorium took immediate effect and will remain in force until April 1, 2007.

In other town council action:

Allen reported that at 6 p.m. April 19 in the community center, the land-use consulting firm, Clarion Associates, will host a public presentation and open house on the final draft of the town's comprehensive plan. The draft is also available online at www.townofpagosasprings.com and hard copies are available upon request.

The council approved a proposal for the undertaking of a feasibility study for the creation of a Pagosa Springs Downtown Development Authority. The cost of the study is $4,950 and will be completed by Angela Atkinson working as consultant for the town.

Town Manager Mark Garcia reported that in a recent conversation with Kara Hellige of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Hellige indicated an environmental assessment for the Phase II of the town's River Restoration Project was being completed.

Following a recent series of ammonia violations, and as part of long-term planning efforts, the Pagosa Springs Town Council, acting as the board for the Town of Pagosa Springs General Improvement District, authorized formal pursuit of a waste water treatment plant compliance schedule to be submitted to the Colorado Department of Public Health. In effect, the compliance schedule outlines the incremental steps the district will take as it works toward constructing a new wastewater treatment facility.

Preliminary plans call for constructing the new facility on the town's present waste water treatment plant site, yet the plan may be modified if downstream land acquisition efforts for the new facility succeed.

According to the proposed schedule, the target completion date is September 2007.

PAWSD softens impact of fees

A capacity crowd filled the new meeting room at the Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District offices Tuesday evening, as attorneys, builders, developers, real estate brokers and involved citizens showed to voice opinions on issues directly related to a new impact fee. The occasion marked the regular PAWSD board monthly meeting for April.

Following the usual review of previous meeting minutes, public comment opened with Trout Unlimited attorney Drew Peternell approaching the board and requesting consideration in reaching a settlement to pending litigation. Trout Unlimited is suing PAWSD over its proposed reservoir in the Dry Gulch area northeast of town.

Peternell explained that TU is not opposed to water diversion and storage projects, but suggested that the district's plans in Dry Gulch were excessive, and would divert too much water from the San Juan River. In essence, he charged PAWSD with filing an application much larger than necessary to support realistic growth projections, and claimed regular diversions of 280 cubic feet per second to continually fill the impoundment would virtually de-water the river.

Board president and chair Karen Wessels responded by expressing her belief that a discussion of the merits of pending litigation would be inappropriate "in this forum," and Peternell agreed. But, then Peternell noted TU's several submissions of "settlement proposals" to PAWSD in hope of resolving their differences, and asked the board to consider a reasonable resolution.

Wessels responded with, "Your request is duly noted."

The board then heard a brief progress report from Patrick O'Brien of Briliam Engineering, the consultants directing improvements at the Hatcher Water Treatment Plant. In large part, aside from a slight delay in an anticipated engineering report, O'Brien said the system expansion planned for this summer looks good, and should be on line between August and October.

Of course, the latest development impact fee recently established by PAWSD drew the lion's share of attention at Tuesday's meeting. Billed as the Water Resource Fee, the $6,343 charge will be assessed on any newly constructed "Equivalent Unit" requesting water service in the district, after November 15. The fee is designed to help PAWSD pay for future raw water development, including the proposed Dry Gulch reservoir.

An equivalent unit is defined as a separate residential, multifamily residential or commercial space, such as a home, townhome, apartment, or commercial business that requires connection to the district water service. Individual residential properties are typically considered one equivalent unit, while a particular formula from the American Water Works Association is used in determining the number of equivalent units in a commercial property, depending on its nature and size.

While the fee is substantial, there is good news ... for now. If a builder manages to submit a completed water form (service request) by June 1, and the tap is installed (with meter set) by Nov. 15, the fee will be waived, thus softening the blow to projects already well underway. Further, in consideration of proposed town and county impact fees, which also contain water elements for future water resource development, the PAWSD fee has been reduced more than $900 per EU.

Even with good news, contractors in attendance took turns expressing dismay over seemingly endless delays in the entire building process, such as obtaining plat approval, sketch plan approval or a building permit, that could prevent them from submitting a water form or placing a tap before PAWSD deadlines. Some even anguished over possible weather delays and other unavoidable obstacles.

In response, board member Bob Huff said, "Well, act of God, or act of PAWSD. If circumstances are not your fault, we'll work with you."

Meanwhile, Mely Whiting stood and asked the board to consider some kind of graduated fee structure to ease the impact on "lower and middle-class" residents. She explained how, in the process of building a new home, she and her husband have faced mounting fees that nearly derailed their dreams.

Still others complained about the size of the fee, siting a current commercial structure that could prevent "mom and pop" restaurant owners from opening their doors, while larger national chains would have little difficulty absorbing the added cost. One builder said the fee structure was unfair, because big developers pay the same as "the little guy," yet they impose a far greater impact on the resources.

As the evening wore on, and comments continued to flow, the board moved to form a committee to look into the possibility of graduated fee structures, and to analyze claims of inaccuracies in forming the basis of its application for the Dry Gulch reservoir. A motion definitively setting the Water Resource Fee at $6,343 per EU passed, and included the establishment of the "grandfather" dates of June 1 and Nov. 15.

By 9:15 p.m., with several items left on the agenda, Wessels suggested adjournment, and moved to place the remaining subjects on next month's schedule. That motion also passed.

Conservation groups challenge Dry Gulch

A water rights application for a $145 million, 35,000 acre-foot reservoir project, planned jointly by the Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District and the San Juan Conservancy District, has the local chapter of a national conservation group and an area environmental group irked, and the entities will face off in water court in early May.

The proposed project, known as the Dry Gulch Reservoir, has come under fire from the Five Rivers Chapter of Trout Unlimited and the San Juan Citizens Alliance who view the water district's move to secure the 35,000 acre-foot water right, plus the right to divert 200 cubic feet per second from the San Juan River east of Pagosa Springs to continually refill the reservoir, as essentially a water grab.

"We think the project is much bigger than any substantiated need. We're not opposed to water storage and we're not opposed to a reservoir at Dry Gulch, but this project is extremely expensive and ties up way too much water," said Drew Peternell, an attorney for Trout Unlimited.

According to water district documents, the Dry Gulch reservoir would be constructed about two miles east of Pagosa Springs and south of U.S. 160.

One of Trout Unlimited's chief complaints is that the Dry Gulch reservoir plan relies on faulty population projections.

Those projections, put forth by Steven Harris of Harris Water Engineering, result in an estimated 2040 area population of 52, 370 and a joint-district need of 12,500 acre-feet, and an estimated 2100 area population of 171,827, and 32,000 acre feet. Yet PAWSD's own documents say "projecting population and water demands nearly 40 years into the future is an exercise in crystal ball gazing."

Nevertheless, Carrie Campbell, district manager for PAWSD, said the Dry Gulch project plays an integral role in the district's long-term planning to meet future demands.

In addition, she said Dry Gulch would also supply a critical safety storage supply that could buffer district residents from the devastating effects of a severe drought year such as in 2002. And storage, Campbell said, is critical.

"I go back to 2002 because it was such an important year as to what drought conditions can do," Campbell said.

Despite attempts to settle out of court, the efforts have failed, and Trout Unlimited the San Juan Citizens Alliance, PAWSD and the San Juan Conservancy District will present their cases to a water judge for a decision May 3, 4 and 5.

Commission to scale mountain of proposals

The Town of Pagosa Springs Planning Commission is about to enter terra incognita, with next week's review of a number of unprecedented, large-scale residential and commercial projects heretofore unseen since the days of the Pagosa Lakes and Fairfield developments.

The meeting, scheduled for 5 p.m. April 18 at Town Hall, sets a new benchmark, with a cumulative total of 385 new residential units being reviewed in one planning commission session.

The following is a list of some of the development projects that will be presented during the session.

Rock Ridge Country Estates, an 11-acre, 108 unit development located at 72 Great West Ave. A public hearing will be held to review the preliminary plan of the project.

Dakota Springs, formerly known as Trujillo Heights, a 30-acre, 219 unit development off of County Road 500.

Dakota Springs is also up for a public hearing and preliminary plan review.

The commission will also review sketch plans for two townhome developments. The first consists of 20 townhomes to be built on South Seventh Street near its intersection with Piedra Street.

The second, called River's Edge, consists of eight townhomes to be constructed along the San Juan River between 250 and 274 San Juan Street.

In addition, the commission will review a 23,000 square foot mixed use building planned for near the intersection of Piedra Road and Eagle Drive. According to preliminary plans, the building will incorporate elements of retail and residential.

And lastly, the commission will perform design review of a 35,000 square foot building slated for use as the new, local headquarters for Parelli Natural Horsemanship. The building will be located off of U.S. 160 in Aspen Village.

Inside The Sun

Sex offender management: Is it enough?

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The Archuleta County Victim Assistance Program has been submitting a series of articles discussing issues surrounding sexual assault, it's prevalence and consequences, as well as our fight against it.

This is the third article in the series detailing sex offender rehabilitation.

Rehabilitation of sex offenders remains a controversial issue. It's common for victims and their families to want the offender "locked up" at all costs. Probation is obviously not a substitute for prison for those who pose too great a risk to the community, but it does have a valuable place in treating offenders and testing their resolve to change.

Sex offender management in our Judicial District is governed by standards and guidelines developed by the State Sex Offender Management Board housed at the Division of Criminal Justice. These standards reflect best practice models based on existing research, and therefore, are a "work in progress." Above all else, sex offender management is carried out with the primary goal of protecting the victim and the community.

Ideally, a sex offender, according to the danger he/she represents to the community, will be sentenced to prison, community corrections or probation. To the public, sentencing may not appear to fit the crime. And, yes, sometimes it doesn't reflect the appropriate level of containment due to a number of factors including lack of local community corrections options available or evidentiary and prosecution hurdles. Some advocate all sex offenders be monitored through GPS (Global Positioning System). As this option would be ideal, it is not feasible _ the costs would be tremendous, approximately $400 per month for each sex offender, or $216,000 per year for our judicial district alone.

However, a wide body of research shows that many adult sex offenders can learn how to avoid offending, provided the appropriate systems are in place. State standards impose a "containment model" for sex offenders on probation to ensure successful rehabilitation as well as community safety. The "containment team," led by the probation officer, also consists of a treatment provider, and a polygraph examiner. Additionally, our local model includes a "circle of support" made up of friends, family, employers or other involved community members or agencies, who are properly educated about sex offenders in general, the profile of their specific offender and what's involved in ensuring community safety. In addition, a Sexual Abuse Advisory Team, comprised of victim advocates and agency representatives, also meets monthly in our judicial district to review current issues in containing specific offenders.

Sex offenders may be placed on probation for periods ranging from two years to life, and some offenders can be kept on probation indefinitely at the court's discretion. All offenders must also follow a set of 21 additional conditions of probation over and above those required for other probationers. Some of these include DNA testing, HIV testing, sex offender registration, computer use restrictions, sobriety, and restrictions on access to community situations involving minors.

Offenders must have frequent contact with their probation officers. Many are on a 24/7 call-in status, meaning that they must inform their probation officer of any change in their location. Risk assessment is a critical, ongoing part of the process. If a sex offender fails to comply with the terms of probation, probation may be revoked and the court may impose a harsher sentence.

Last, treatment is crucial. For adult offenders, treatment takes a minimum of four years and includes a curriculum in which a number of specific goals must be met for successful completion. The use of clinical polygraphy greatly enhances treatment and supervision as another tool to monitor success of rehabilitation.

The public can be reassured that sex offender management is a communitywide priority involving the criminal justice system and many other interested agencies working together to ensure that both victims and the community are being protected.

To obtain a list of registered sex offenders in your area, contact your local law enforcement agency or file a request with the Colorado Bureau of Investigations (CBI). You can visit the CBI Web site at www.cbi.state.co.us to obtain a request form, or view offenders who have multiple offenses, have failed to register, or are sexually violent predators.

 

Republicans set assembly date and place

The Archuleta County Republican Assembly will be held April 22 at 9 a.m. at the county fairground Extension Building.

The purpose of Colorado county assemblies is:

_ To designate the candidates to be listed as Republicans on the primary ballot;

_ To consider all resolutions generated by the various precincts and determine which should be forwarded to the Colorado state assembly;

_ To ratify the precinct committeemen elected at the caucus;

_ Elect delegates and alternates to the higher assemblies.

Members of the county assembly are those delegates and alternates elected at the precinct caucuses and confirmed by the credentials committee.

All delegates and alternates elected at the precinct caucuses must be processed in and seated at their assigned tables promptly at 9 a.m.

For more information, contact Mojie Adler, secretary, Archuleta County Republican Central Committee, 3190 Meadows Drive, Pagosa Springs, 731-04277.

United Way seeks volunteer help

United Way of Southwest Colorado needs volunteers to serve on the Archuleta County Community Investment Committee.

The Community Investment Committee determines where the funds that United Way raises in Archuleta County will be invested. This committee reviews requests for funding from local nonprofit organizations and then makes funding recommendations, based on the information provided, to United Way of Southwest Colorado's board of directors.

Nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations that are providing services under the categories of Affordable Housing, Crisis Intervention, Education, Family Support, Senior Services and Youth Services can apply. Applications are due to United Way of Southwest Colorado by May 4.

To volunteer, to get more information, or to receive an application, contact Stacia Kemp at 264-3230 or staciak@unitedway-swco.org.

Intermediate school third-quarter honor roll

Mark DeVoti, principal at Pagosa Springs Intermediate School is proud to announce the third quarter honor roll for students receiving all A's, and those receiving A/B honors.

Fifth-grade students receiving straight A's (GPA 4.0) for the third quarter are: Keith Archuleta, Satara Arthaud, Sable Baxtrom, Megan Davey, Garek Erskine, Kitman Gill, Alyssa Lee, Kain Lucero, Travis Maley, Hannah Matzdorf, Nikolas Monteferrante, Summer Neff, Jasmine Nesbit, Gabrielle Pajak, Jason Reece, Julio Rodriguez, Shannon Rogers, Blake Roman, Clay Ross, Jonah, Sanchez, Samuel Sarnowski, Kendra Schlom, Toni Stoll, Tyler Talbot, Brandan Thomas and Isaiah Thompson.

Sixth-grade students receiving All A's for the third quarter are: Kyle Anderson Andresen Sydney Aragon, Moses Audetat-Mirabal, Leslie Baughman, Kyle Danielson, Brooklyn DuCharme, Mary Haynes, Alexandra Herrera, Samantha Hunts, Katrina McGovern, Natasha Medici, Austin Miller, Reahna Ray and Michael Reynders.

Fifth-grade students receiving A/B honors (GPA 3.0 or higher) are: Montana Bailey, Tristen Bennett, Sean Blanchard, Katie Blue, Justin Boyd, Sierra Bryson, Matthew Cary, Kevin Crow, Emma Donharl, Sienna Espinosa, Angela Gallegos, Dalton Gregory, Zachariah Griego, Dean Hampton, Amber Hanley, Brannon Harbur, Chandler Holt, Kylie Johnson, Jaime Kirkland, Sean Lee, Thomas Levonius, Megan Loran, Travis Loran, Christopher Mannara, Sarah Mevis, Mandon Miller, Mireya Ortega, Walker Powe, Benjamin Reece, Emma Reynders, Alejandra Sanchez, Quinn Smith, Elijah Stephens, Rowan Taylor, Cierra Weiss and Coleman Zellner.

Sixth-grade students receiving A/B honors are: Mattie Aiello, Katya Armbrecht, Tiffany Bachtel, Matthew Baker, Laura Bell, Sarah Bir, Saje Brinkman, Zachary Brinkmann, Evan Brookens, Jerica Caler, Sissy Dodson, Justin Duncan, Alexandra Fortney, Karis Fritzsche, Zoe Fulco, Brook Hampton, Seth Hansen, Abbi Hicklin, Zack Irons, Dylan Koch, Kent Lord, Drew Mackey, Daniel Martinez, Katelyn McRee, Charisse Morris, Eurisko PeBenito, Kristi Plum, Daniel Puskas, Kalie Ray, Samuel Roman, Tyson Ross, Karla Sanchez, Kelsy Sellers, Jonathan Shirk, Brook Spears, Tori Strohecker, Alex Theys, Silas Thompson, Mariah Vasquez, Cheyann Walker, Tiffany Watson and Jennie White.

Ross memorial basketball tourney this weekend

The 11th annual Dirk and Colt Ross Memorial Basketball Tournament kicks off action today in the intermediate and junior high school gymnasiums.

Teams this year include top-level high school players as well as college players and college alumni players from Division 1 and 2 schools.

There will be a total 46 games played today, Friday and Saturday.

Four games will be played tonight, beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Tomorrow, April 14, eight games take place in the gyms, from 2-9 p.m.

Saturday, the action intensifies, with 26 games, the first starting at 8:30 a.m. and the tourney expected to end at 9 p.m.

Fan favorite special events take place Saturday 5:30-6 p.m. with the Dirk and Colt Ross memorial, the three-point shootout and the slam dunk contest.

The public is invited to attend and enjoy great basketball action.

All proceeds from the tourney go to the scholarship fund.

Fastpitch softball Saturday, sign-ups and training set

The Pagosa Hot Shots 12 and under fastpitch team plays the Kirtland Rockets Saturday, April 15. For game time and location call 903-8878

For girls ages 13-18, April 15 is the registration deadline for that age group's fastpitch softball. If interested, attend the mandatory parent meeting 10 a.m. Saturday, April 15, at the community center. Prospective players and their parents can meet the 2006 coaches, umpires and scorekeepers. The 2006 season spring training is scheduled to begin April 24 and teams are filling up fast. Sign-up forms are available at local school offices.

ASA training and recertification clinics for adults are also on the schedule. Individuals interested in training to be an ASA coach, umpire or team scorekeeper are invited to the program April 22 in Pagosa Springs. Anyone needing more information or wanting to sign up should call S.W.C A.S.A Girls Fastpitch Association at 903-8878.

Record numbers at 9HealthFair

Attendance at the 9Health Fair in Pagosa Springs continues to increase.

Last year approximately 668 people attended; this year 747 participated in the many available screenings and education centers, aided by the 200-plus volunteers who made the event possible.

The line to enter the fair was forming by 7 a.m.; individuals were seen dozing in their cars as early as 6:45 and at 7:30 sharp the doors opened. Participants began taking advantage of screenings of every sort _ height and weight, body mass index, hearing, vision, bone density, skin fold measurement, breast exams, oral screening, body in balance and much more. A wide variety of health and safety information was readily available at many interactive education centers.

By far, the benefit most utilized by the community was the low-cost blood chemistry analysis, with an increase of 97 participants over last year. Despite endless explanations that traffic to the blood draw station is controlled in groups of 50, according to the individual's form number, and that standing in line does not hasten progress, people insisted on standing, so they did. Twenty phlebotomists donated their time and skill in this community effort.

An increase of 33 male fair participants invested in PSA tests and both men and women invested in 299 colorectal kits, an increase of 111 over last year. This significant increase is evidence that people understand how important and effective it is to identify colon cancer at the outset. Those seeking further information about their health took the time to stop and visit the "Talk with a Health Care Professional" station to discuss their concerns with local doctors, another totally free medical benefit.

Another significant increase in participation occurred in our Hispanic community. Twelve Spanish language forms were utilized, compared to none or one in the past, and translation tasks were handled by two of our phlebotomists and by representatives of the San Juan Basin Health Department.

All who took advantage of the fair are to be congratulated for taking responsibility for their health, and the medical and non-medical volunteers and exhibitors who made the day possible deserve the gratitude of the community.

Volunteers needed for home meal program

Are you looking for a way to volunteer some time to your community and make an immediate impact on someone's life?

The Silver Foxes Den Senior Center has an opportunity for you to make new friends while you donate one lunch hour per week to the home-delivered meal program for the community's senior citizens.

Applications are currently being accepted from individuals _ as well as businesses, churches and other organizations _ who would like to make a difference.

All applicants must provide their own vehicle and be available in one-hour increments once a week. The Den is also accepting applications for substitute drivers. A background check will be completed on all applicants.

Adopt a home-delivered route today and brighten the lives of a few senior citizens.

For more information, contact Musetta at 264-2167.

USFS plans prescribed burns this spring

 

Fire managers hope to begin conducting some prescribed burns on the San Juan Public Lands to reduce hazardous fuels over the next several weeks.

Burning could begin as early as this week near Dolores, the week of April 17 around Durango, and toward the end of April near Pagosa. Approximately 4,500 acres are planned for burning.

Prescribed burns are low-intensity fires, which are set and carefully monitored by fire crews. They are used to improve forest health and reduce "ladder fuels," the shrubs and other plants that can carry flames up into tree canopies, turning a manageable wildland blaze into a devastating crown fire.

"We call these prescribed burns because there is a 'prescription' or several conditions that must be met before we'll even think about igniting a fire," said Mark Lauer, fire management officer for the San Juan Public Lands Center in Durango.

A burn plan spells out those conditions which include temperatures; relative humidity; moisture level of the grasses, needles, and trees; wind speed and direction; and smoke dispersal. Spring and fall are generally the best times of year to burn because the temperatures are more moderate and the fuels have enough moisture to keep the fire at a low intensity.

Managers must make sure they have adequate crew and equipment, as well as some back-up crew.

Prescribed burns may be ignited by firefighters on the ground using a device known as "drip torch" or from the air by dropping incendiary material from a helicopter. Regardless of how a prescribed fire is started, it is monitored by ground crews. The crews make sure the fire stays within natural and human-made firebreaks.

Proposed projects in the Pagosa district include:

_ Vigil Abeyta, 477 acres, 30 miles south of Pagosa Springs.

_ Kenney Flats, 792 acres, 14 miles south of Pagosa Springs.

_ Valle Seco, Unit 16, 141 acres, 15 miles south of Pagosa Springs.

_ Devil Creek, 632 acres, seven miles northwest of Pagosa Springs.

Most prescribed burns on the San Juan National Forest are conducted in mid-elevation ponderosa pine forests, which historically burned naturally every 10-30 years and are dependent upon fire for ecological health. These forests now exhibit an unnatural buildup of woody debris on the forest floor, an increased density of trees, and thick stands of underbrush, due in part, to fire suppression over the past century.

"Residents are often concerned about the smoke from prescribed burns," said Lauer, "but need to remember that it is generally short term and much less significant than the smoke from an unplanned wildfire."

Prescribed fire is by far the most economical fuel-removal tool, depending on the terrain and complexity of the fuels. It is also the most effective tool for treating a large number of acres. Drought conditions have precluded fire managers from accomplishing much prescribed fire over the past several years.

Prescribed burning serves several purposes including:

_ reducing the buildup of these fuels to a more normal level;

_ improving the health of ponderosa pine stands by reducing competition from oak brush;

_ improving deer and elk habitat by opening up the forest canopy to allow more sunlight to reach the ground and stimulate the growth of grasses and forbs; and

_ releasing natural minerals and nutrients into the soil.

Radio announcements for each burn will be made just prior to beginning the burn. For additional information abo ut the proposed burns or other fuels-reduction efforts, residents are invited to call the Pagosa Ranger District at 264-2268.

Outdoors Catch and Release

Three jewel-like rivers in Patagonia

Patagonia. The name alone inspires images of some of the most rugged and inaccessible terrain on the planet, and true to its reputation, Patagonia is a land of superlatives.

Tucked away on the southern tip of South America, the region is home to some of the continent's wildest and most savage peaks, one of the world's last advancing glaciers, some of the bleakest, most windswept steppes and is one of the least populated and most isolated parts of the world.

The region straddles the Andean cordillera and stretches into both Chile and Argentina, beginning at roughly the 37th parallel, then running south for 1,200 miles until its terminus at Cape Horn in Tierra del Fuego. All told, the region encompasses an area of roughly 400,000 square miles, with Argentine Patagonia eating up the bulk of the land with 310,000 square miles to its credit _ roughly the area of three Colorados.

And through this vast landscape, this land of superlatives, flow many of the continent's most powerful rivers and some of fly fishing's most storied streams. And this is not without good reason _ because in these rivers, from their sources high along the Andean spine to their outlets on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, live some of the world's largest trout.

But in this region of all things massive, I was searching for something small, not small trout, but small streams, places a high-country, dry fly angler might feel at home. My search led to the Patagonian Lake District and the discovery of three jewel-like rivers in the southernmost portion of Argentina's Parque Nacional Lanin _ the Rios Caleufu, Filo Hua Hum and Meliquina.

True to the nature of the rivers in the region, the trio is born from high glacial lakes, namely, the Lagos Meliquina and Filo Hua Hum, and the rivers tumble a tumultuous path eastward, through the Andean foothills to the arid steppes below. Together, the three comprise much of the fishable river miles in the northern portion of the Seven Lakes region of the park, and although they might be considered small by Patagonian standards, they are not streams to be taken lightly _ think of the San Juan, Piedra or Animas rivers running at full bore. Yet perhaps because of their size, and the fact they lack the fabled stature of such storied rivers as the Malleo and Chimehuin, foreigners often don't consider them destination waters. Yet among Argentines, the fisheries are well regarded, such that the Club Norysur, one of Argentina's first and most exclusive private fishing clubs, built their lodge on the shore of Lago Meliquina overlooking the lake and the source of the river of the same name.

The Rio Meliquina, like the Filo Hua Hum and the Caleufu, is managed as a fly fishing only, catch and release stream. Anglers wishing to fish the Meliquina must use flies with a single barbless hook and return all fish to the stream. From the lake's outlet, and the river's source, called a boca in Argentine angling, the river makes a hard S-turn and disappears into a deep, heavily forested canyon. Access to the river, from the boca, and for about for about the first three miles, is difficult due to private property, but soon Provincial Route 63 parallels the river and access points become self evident.

Unfortunately, Argentina's national parks, including Parque Nacional Lanin, are different than their North American counterparts. The parks are often inundated with private property and inholdings and are crisscrossed by heavily used roadways, which are often in clear view of the rivers. To make matters worse, backcountry trails leading to more remote waters are virtually nonexistent. Under these conditions, those looking for a true wilderness fishing experience might be disappointed, however, hiking the riverbanks up or downstream often leads to lightly fished waters.

Martin Etcheverry, a Meliquina fly fishing guide, who, with his brother Daniel, runs the Refugio Lago Meliquina, said Argentine fishing regulations regarding river access are much like those in Montana. If an angler can access the river at a bridge or other river crossing, they can then wade and fish the river below the high water mark even on private property.

"If you're walking along the banks and aren't camping, making a fire or knocking down fences and are clearly fishing, you're fine," Etcheverry said.

But hiking along its banks, and wading the Rio Meliquina, even though it is considered a small stream, can be a daunting task. For anglers, wading means clamoring over boulders and crashing through willow thickets, and once in the river itself, the current is deceivingly fast and the footing on softball-sized cobbles can be treacherous. Despite the difficulties, fishing the emerald green currents of the Rio Meliquina is well worth the effort. The river holds healthy populations of brown and rainbow trout _ some up to six or seven pounds _ both of which readily strike dry flies and subsurface patterns, although coaxing a lunker brown from the Meliquina's depths usually requires anglers to fish deep with a sinking line.

From the river's source at Lago Meliquina to its confluence with the smaller, Rio Filo Hua Hum, anglers have roughly nine miles of river and a variety of water types to fish _ deep pools, riffle runs and long stretches of hip-deep gravelly flats. The variety of water allows for a wide array of tactics, from high-stick nymphing, to stripping wets and streamers. Exciting hatches of caddis and mayflies allow dry fly fanatics to sight fish to rising trout.

Two primitive campgrounds with no facilities, other than fire pits, allow streamside camping for self sufficient anglers, while the camping area at nearby Lago Filo Hua Hum has hot showers, a small café and store with cold beer, wine and other essentials. For those desiring hotel accommodations, the smart, little mountain town of San Martin de los Andes makes for a convenient day trip base at just about an hour away.

The next stop for those fishing south, and downstream along Provincial Route 63 and the Rio Meliquina is the small but lively, Rio Filo Hua Hum. The lower river drains the lake of the same name, and on its short, two-mile course, before converging with the Rio Meliquina, it crashes over boulders and through a canyon whose walls are thick with heavy stands of tall pines. Access to the lower river is available at two key points, the first is at the bright yellow Rio Filo Hua Hum bridge, which is about a mile south of the lower Rio Meliquina bridge. And the second is at the Lago Filo Hua Hum outlet. Using the bridge access, anglers can work either up or downstream, while access at the outlet is a one-way affair with downstream fishing the only real option. In either case, once on the lower river, anglers will have two miles of fishing solitude and this stretch of the Rio Filo Hua Hum often feels the most remote of the three Patagonian streams.

Down in the canyon, during the heat of midsummer, the high grass, willow-choked banks and the forest floor carpeted in brick red pine needles provides habitat for fat grasshoppers, and for those willing to make the two mile trek, the rewards are great _ casting big hopper patterns amongst mid-stream boulders to aggressive browns and sleek rainbows is just one of the benefits of the journey. But there is more to the Rio Filo Hua Hum than just the lower river.

From Provincial Route 63, about nine miles south of the south end of Lago Meliquina, lies Provincial Route 64, a dead-end turnoff leading to Lago Filo Hua Hum. En route, the road passes through the Lago Filo Hua Hum campground, and terminates at the far end of the lake. This route provides anglers access to the upper Rio Filo Hua Hum and Quieto Creek _ both fly fishing only, catch and release waters and very different animals then their counterpart below the lake.

While the lower river is a raucous boulder-strewn, canyon-based stream, the upper river and its tributary, Quieto Creek, move in sleepy, serpentine fashion, meandering through a broad glacial valley, high grassy meadows and ultimately into the lake. The two streams and their glassy, featureless currents are much like spring creeks both in temperament and clarity, and long, fine leaders, delicate casts and stealth are absolutely essential. For those who enjoy stalking trout and can throw a long, precise cast, the upper Rio Filo Hua Hum is paradise. For anglers who trudge like Neanderthals from one hole to another, the upper river will prove humbling, humiliating and exasperating. And although the two streams look like premier, dry fly only water, olive wooly buggers and olive minnow patterns fished deep under the cutback banks will lure numerous, mid-sized rainbows to the take.

As a bonus, for anglers who enjoy bird watching, the upper Rio Filo Hua Hum valley provides opportunities to view typical Patagonian birds such as the tero-tero, Vanellus chilensis, and bandurrias, Theristicus caudatus. The tero-teros are ground-nesting birds, and as you walk through the meadows of the upper Rio Filo Hua Hum, you will be dive bombed as the petulant birds race to protect their nests and their young. The bandurrias are also a raucous lot, and they are commonly seen foraging in meadows and wetlands for bugs and frogs. Part of the area's avian scene also includes the chimango caracara, a small brownish hawk and one of the regions many species of raptor. And lastly, watchful anglers might catch a glimpse of a giant Andean condor soaring on a thermal high overhead.

With all the Filo Hua Hum area has to offer, staying at Camping Lago Filo Hua Hum, located mid-way up the lake, is the best way to explore fishing opportunities on the upper and lower rivers. The campground has sites for tents and small rental cabins. If camping isn't part of the plan, the area can also be visited on a day trip from San Martin de Los Andes, yet driving back and forth along Provincial Route 64 between the lake and the main road to San Martin can be a bone jarring experience. The road is passable, although two spots are dangerous and punishing for the average passenger car. Yet at some point, those who visit the Filo Hua Hum will have to make the journey for the road provides the sole route to and from the lake, and provides the only link to Provincial Route 63 and the last river on the three-river tour — the Rio Caleufu.

If the Rio Meliquina is emerald, and the upper Rio Filo Hua Hum is diamond clear, then the Rio Caleufu, which is formed by the convergence of the two, is the most brilliant of all sapphires. Its waters, flowing razor sharp in hues of azure, thunder through a weather-sculpted gorge with walls studded by bizarre rock formations and solitary outcrops. Through this otherworldly landscape, the Caleufu flows fast, and the torrential current has cut deep channels in the streambed, providing perfect habitat for large powerful trout. But getting to the fish is not an easy task.

All told, the river flows thirty miles from its conception to where it meets the Rio Collon Cura, and of that thirty miles, just four are accessible to anglers in the park via a number of pullouts along Route 63. In addition, along with limited overall access, physically arriving streamside can be challenging _ one does not simply stroll up to the river and cast. Reaching the banks of the Caleufu requires tough bushwacking down a steep ravine covered in thorny, wader-shredding shrubs, and once an angler successfully arrives streamside, the question remains, how does one wade such a stream. The topography makes it possible to walk the banks, but wading out into the stream, especially after a period of heavy rain, or following a winter with good snow pack is foolhardy. Within feet of the bank, the river drops off into deep pools and channels, some from six to 12 feet deep. The clarity of the water makes judging its true depth difficult, and one poorly estimated step could send one swimming. However, while the river's depth and clarity makes for treacherous wading, it does have its benefits: The clarity allows for sight fishing with streamers and a sinking line for rainbows hunkering down deep in the shadows. Watching a trout attack a streamer as it is stripped through the bottom of a pool is a thrill that is hard to beat, and anglers who are competent with heavy flies and sinking lines will come into their own on the Rio Caleufu. But the river is not just streamer water, and a Madame X, skated on the back cast can arouse vicious strikes from the Caleufu's large browns.

After ten days in the region with the final two spent on the Rio Caleufu, my time in Patagonia had come to a close. The trip had been hot and dusty and by day 10, I craved a pint of home brew made by Martin's brother Daniel at the Refugio Lago Meliquina.

As Martin pulled the tap and golden liquid slowly filled the glass, we spoke of trout, Patagonian fishing and angling in the western United States. And as we talked, the conversation drifted to the inevitable question. "So what do you think of the fishing in Patagonia?" Martin asked.

I stopped, stared at the ceiling, scratched my beard, and my mind raced. Truth be told, if you gauge a trip's quality by inches and pounds of trout, then my journey had not been epic. Although I had caught and released numerous fish, there were perhaps just five worth talking about, but none were larger than trout I had caught back home and none were as large as the fish pictured in the glossy tourist brochures. But before I had thought the question through, I blurted out, "I think it's okay, but I think the fishing back home is as good or better."

Before I finished the sentence, I realized I had just made an absolute ass of myself. There I was drinking the man's beer, standing in his restaurant and insulting his home waters. In some places, the words I had uttered were fighting words, and I quickly checked myself, but not before a smirk crept across Martin's face.

"I take that back," I stammered.

"What I meant to say is, you don't learn to fish a region in just one week. Rivers are living things, their temperaments change with the seasons and it takes a lifetime to truly learn just one stream."

Martin nodded in silent agreement, but the damage was done, and before walking back to the kitchen to prepare a pizza, Martin reached for a small photo album and pushed it across the bar toward me.

"Have a look," he said.

As I sipped my beer, I flipped through its pages. It was stuffed with glossy photographs of Martin and happy clients on the Meliquina, the Filo Hua Hum and the Caleufu; and in each photograph the subject held an enormous trout. They are out there, Martin had the proof and I had caught glimpses of them, and without a doubt, I stood corrected.

Later, we walked out onto the patio in front of the lodge and Martin lit a cigarette, took a deep drag and stared out across the lake. He peered across water, staring into its depths, then squinted and gazed to the mountains beyond. He looked pensive, like a man who had been vexed by something years ago, and perhaps that something was an ever-elusive monster brown lurking in Lago Meliquina's depths.

"I think it's time for me to go fishing," Martin said.

And his fever was contagious, and as I stared out across the lake, reflecting on my own Patagonian journey, I replied, "And I think I'll soon be back."

Letters

Small town help

Dear Editor:

My family and I wanted to thank several of the people from your lovely community.

We were on vacation several weeks ago and were really looking forward to skiing and soaking in your springs. Unfortunately, my 2-year-old became ill while we were there.

Being in a new community and stranded at the hotel without a car, we needed assistance in getting to a doctor. Mary from the Springs Resort graciously helped in arranging transportation. Several people from the Rose Restaurant and the Jackisch drugstore also were of tremendous help in locating a doctor. Dan Keuning from the Family Practice office not only gave us a quick diagnosis but even gave us his cell phone number in case anyone else in our family became ill. I was so impressed with everyone that we came in contact with. Your town still has a small-town charm that is hard to find anymore. It really warmed my heart to have so many caring people help me, a complete stranger.

Thanks to all of these people. They helped make our stay so much easier.

Sincerely,

Anne Buck

New Braunfels, Texas

Close the door

Dear Editor:

Yes it's true, I am a recent immigrant to the Pagosa area. I came here from southern California and now I want to close the door to more people coming to the area. How selfish of me. But let's look at the reasons that I left my home of 50 years. The beauty of the Pagosa area definitely had its attraction along with the small-town environment. What a delight to see open country with cattle and horses grazing. To drive the roads and pass few cars on the highway, what a joy.

My home town had grown from a population of a little over 30,000 to 600,000. It took 15 minutes to get through an intersection. The median home price was over half a million dollars. The reason the housing prices were so high was that there was no longer any decent land to build new homes on. All of the land that could be developed had been developed. The quality of life had definitely deteriorated from that time when the town had a population of 30 thousand.

And now we are faced with development along the Highway 84 corridor. The land along the sides of Highway 84 is flat and rolling and a developer's dream. Can you just imagine in a couple of years, standing where the rodeo grounds are and looking south and as far as you can see are commercial buildings lining the four lane highway and houses rising to the mountain peaks on both sides of the highway. The next project along Highway 84 will be the Valley View Ranch otherwise known as the "Blue Ranch." Why is it that most developers are from out of state?

I realize that property owners have rights, but don't the people have rights also? When are the city and county leaders going to collaborate on a plan that will include zoning requirements and minimum acreage? Can you imagine if the minimum lot size for a single family dwelling was 35 acres? I realize that this may be extreme, but there is nothing wrong with three to five acres. In eastern Oregon the minimum lot size for a single family dwelling is three acres. The reason is lack of water. I am surprised that our water authority has not been more vocal on this matter.

The common interests of the masses will most certainly lose the battle to the developers. They almost always do because they have very little legal clout to use in the fight. In our case the city and county have done nothing with regards to zoning or minimum lot sizes and I do not see any action on the horizon. How long would it take to establish an intergovernmental agreement between the city and county on minimum lot sizes, 30 days, 60 days? It will be too late when the Blue Ranch developers have begun marking off 60x100 foot lot sizes for single family residences.

Fred Bunney

On hold

Dear Editor:

A message to Karen Sass:

Please keep your plans to buy property here on hold.

Thank you,

Cindy Gustafson

Positive, please

Dear Editor:

For 30 years, my wife worked in a hospital in many capacities. Most recently and for over a decade, she was the executive assistant to the CEO of the hospital in our little town of about 4,500 people in Homer, Alaska. After retiring from the U.S. Air Force after 26 years, my last five years in a civilian job was as the material manager who purchased all the medical supplies and services necessary to keep our hospital operating at peak efficiency and our friends and family in the community healthy.

Having seen how very well the 40 bed hospital served our small community in remote Alaska, we believe it is well past time to provide similar services to the community here in Pagosa Springs. We support the current members of the Upper San Juan Health Service District as they act to fulfill a very obvious need for such services.

Patty Tillerson's voice rings out with negativity on the subject of creating a critical access hospital for this fair community. What will Ms. Tillerson do when the election is over on the second of May 2006 and the community votes to build a hospital worthy of the town's support? With due respect to Ms. Tillerson's having served on the board of the Upper San Juan Health Service District, her amazingly dour comments appear to be a "head in the sand" approach to the future. We would suggest that instead of criticizing so consistently and negatively, we would like to hear positive suggestions, other than "let's go back to the way we were."

It's a documented fact that hospitalized patients recover faster with family surrounding them. Having a critical access hospital in our lovely and burgeoning town would let that happen by negating the need for a 100 mile round trip or expensive overnight stays for a family member to be with a loved one in need of such care. Advanced diagnostic tests and systems can be a lifesaver. Not having to be urgently transported via ambulance or helicopter to a surrounding facility and receiving such tests locally makes sense both in the realm of economics as well as life saving patient care.

Rather than continued harping on perceived negatives, we would appreciate seeing suggestions that would enhance the effort to build a critical access hospital to serve our community, family and friends.

Pagosa Springs is growing, and my wife and I are certainly among those "newcomers" helping to make that happen. We moved here anticipating that in the years to come a hospital would be established in this fair community that would meet our needs as we grow older _ and it is happening much faster than we anticipated. Yes, we're relatively recent newcomers to this beautiful town, although my Colorado roots go back over 120 years and family ties to Pagosa Springs go back nearly 60 years.

We urge each of you to consider the facts, review both the negatives and positives, and vote your conscience on the second of May 2006. The choice is clear _ we can "stay the way we were," or move on to a future with the promise of having medical care meeting the standards our community deserves.

Joe and Debbie Hannigan

Get out and vote

Dear Editor:

We encourage all registered voters to vote in the Upper San Juan Health Service District Regular Election.

The ballot will list four candidates for four Board seats and ask, "Do you want a hospital in Pagosa?"

The regular election will be held May 2, 2006 ,at the Vista Clubhouse, 230 Port Ave., Pagosa Springs. The polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Absentee ballots are available. Fill out an application at the district office, 189 N. Pagosa Blvd. (behind the fire station), and the absentee ballot will be given to you. You can either vote at the district office, or take the ballot home and return it via mail to the Archuleta County Clerk's office (addressed envelope provided). Or call (970) 731-5812 to request the application be sent to you. A signature, birth date and mailing address will be required for the absentee ballot to be sent to you.

Please vote.

Pam Hopkins

Stupid people

Dear Editor:

Mountains used to be ventured by the few, the brave, and the stupid (but the stupid usually didn't make it down). Roads on these passes used to be unpaved with washboards to check your speed and maybe a guardrail to bounce off of _ if you were lucky. The old roads kept the wilderness sacred and wild. Only those who cared dared to venture onto these mountain roads. But times-are-a-chang'n. We are making it too easy for the stupid people to go to the mountains. They are destroying the mountains in order to try and survive. The stupid people are making survival in the mountains about prosperity. Your wilderness safety cannot stand up against the dirtiest business deal. By making the road to Wolf Creek more accessible, we have invited big developers, like McCombs, to dream up a village in this uncharted land.

Those that have fought against the Village at Wolf Creek have put forth a valiant effort to stop stupid people from implementing their survival tactics. The Web site www.friendsofwolfcreek.org exposes the illegal covert deals with the U.S. Forest Service. Even Rep. Mark Larson found it necessary to put forth a resolution to expose the ugly business that the forest service had with McCombs. With all of these people against such an action, it is surprising that McCombs was granted permission to build an access road to his property where he plans to build condos to accommodate 10,000 people and a small power plant.

Obviously providing evidence of corruption in the USFS and legislative support didn't work. Money is a solution, but in order for it to have power, it must be fueled by greed. Maybe people should think of Wolf Creek like they think of their bank accounts, the more trees there are, the richer we will be.

Gloria Kaasch

Durango

Crucial

Dear Editor:

Last week, a letter titled "No Sense" by Karen M. Sass from Port St. Lucie, Florida, questioned opposition of the Village at Wolf Creek by our congressman, John Salazar. The writer appears to have a comprehension of the geography in the surrounding region so this letter will not explain the physical relationship of Mineral County where the "Village" is proposed, but a comment seems necessary about the inequity resulting from taxes generated by the proposed development going to that county while the fiscal, economic and social impacts will saddle the adjoining counties.

Rather, the intent of this letter is to describe the basis of one of Rep. Salazar's concerns about the development. The "Village" is at the headwaters of the Rio Grande River which flows into the San Luis Valley in Rio Grand County. Mr. Salazar grew up in the San Luis Valley and knows the importance of river water quality in agriculture. He is focused on the effects of degraded water quality in the river resulting from development activity at its source. He is in touch with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers which has the responsibility to issue permits for development activity which threatens water quality. Although only one of many concerns about the proposed Village at Wolf Creek, Rep. Salazar's concern is a crucial one and his representation of his constituents is to be applauded.

Jim Lincoln

Appalled

Dear Editor:

As an Archuleta County resident, I am appalled at the oversized Dry Gulch Reservoir project, as planned. I have no problem supporting a smaller reservoir at the Dry Gulch site, but the enormous scale of the current proposal is a serious threat to draining our beautiful and fragile San Juan River. The river is the life blood of Pagosa Springs. We all remember how it almost dried up only a couple of years ago. The adverse effects of this plan could destroy the ecological, recreational and aesthetic values of our precious river.

I don't want my tax dollars _ or higher water fees _ to pay for this new, needlessly large reservoir. Let's plan conservatively and responsibly, and preserve our treasured river.

Bill Mitchell

Crossroads

Dear Editor:

Our community is now at a crossroads concerning an important part of our infrastructure. The constituents of the Upper San Juan Health Services District on May 2, 2006, will determine if a critical access hospital shall be constructed in Pagosa Springs. There will not be a tax increase to construct or operate this facility, yet it will offer access to services now rendered only outside of our community. A critical access hospital will become a major employer, retain monies within our community, improve current health services and will be the cornerstone for additional health services for years in the future. We fully support the construction of the proposed facility.

Jim Pruitt, M.D.

Mark Wienpahl, M.D.

Robert Bricca, M.D.

Congratulations, but ...

Dear Editor:

I hereby add my name to the list of Pagosans in congratulating our fine fire department and the men and women, both volunteers and full-time staff, on their continuing great support of our community. The many hours of training required to respond to a multitude and variety of incidents must be recognized and should be rewarded. Nevertheless, I personally do not think that the chief and the assistant chief deserve to reward themselves with dress uniforms at our expense. Nor should they rank themselves to Navy captains as displayed by the gold stripes on their sleeves.

Respectfully,

Sepp Ramsperger

Community News

Spring Fling dance next week

April showers bring May flowers, and colorful crocuses will be emerging from mounds of "snow" on each and every table at the community center "Spring Fling" dance, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Friday, April 21.

This month, we will feature a DJ provided by KWUF, and we assure you there will be a good variety of music played for your dancing enjoyment. There will be a cash bar with assorted beer, wine and soft drinks. Snacks will be provided at no additional charge. The dance is an over-21 event and ID may be checked at the door.

Tickets are just $5 per person in advance and $8 at the door. Tickets are available at the community center and at WolfTracks. Tables can be reserved for parties of 8-10. We will take reservations at the community center for seats at our new singles tables.

The dances are monthly events at the community center and are an affordable evening out on the town dancing and visiting with friends, and provide a good way to make new friends.

In June, the community center dance will feature a very popular band, the High Rollers, of Durango. The date will be June 23, and the time will be 7-11 p.m. Details are currently being firmed up and will be printed in a future edition of The PREVIEW.

For additional information on the monthly dances, contact Mercy at 264-4152, or me, at 731-9670.

The center is located at 451 Hot Springs Boulevard.

Fair royalty pageant deadline approaches

The Archuleta County Fair Board invites all young ladies, ages 6-18, to participate in the annual Fair Royalty Pageant.

To qualify, you must still be active in the education system, as well as be willing to participate in practice sessions and an interview process prior to the May 7 Royalty Pageant.

Parents should take note of these important dates.

April 14 - Deadlines for applications. A dance practice, with Jana Birch, is set for 2-4 p.m.

April 15 - Dance practice with Jana Birch, 10 a.m.-noon.

April 21 - Dance practice, 2-4 p.m.

April 22 - Dance practice, 10 a.m.-noon.

April 27 - Public speaking and poise with John Porter, 4-5 p.m.

The above-mentioned activities will be held at the Extension Office.

May 6 - Pageant interviews, 9 a.m.-noon.

May 7- Pageant, 5-7 p.m. Participants must be present for rehearsal at 4 p.m.

These activities will be held in the high School auditorium.

The Pageant for Archuleta County Fair Royalty is a tradition that celebrates our wonderful youth in the county. A new queen, princess and junior princess will be crowned May 7, to serve for the following year.

Everyone is invited to attend and cheer on the candidates. Many young girls will participate, but only three will win the title. Every one of these girls is a winner, however, because of who she is and we applaud them.

Applications can be picked up at the Chamber of Commerce and at the Extension Office. For more information, visit our Web site at www.archuletacountyfair.com/royalty.html.

Terri Hendrix returns to Pagosa for Indiefest

Now that the FolkWest Independent Music Festival (or Indiefest for short) is a mere two months away, the public's curiosity is growing.

Indiefest will take place June 10 and 11 on Reservoir Hill, right here in Pagosa Springs. In the interest of dispelling any misconceptions and other general confusion about the event, I'd like to address some of the more common inquiries we've received.

Question: Why is it called Indiefest? Is it Indian music?

Answer: No, Indie musicians are not signed by a major recording label and publish music on their own label or with a small company. Some Indie bands haven't yet "been discovered," others have turned down record deals to retain control over their own careers. We respect both kinds of Indie musicians.

Question: Will Indiefest have the same kind of music as your other festival, the Four Corners Folk Festival?

Answer: Yes and no. Some of the artists on this year's bill have performed at Four Corners - Ruthie Foster, Eileen Ivers and Terri Hendrix. But other Indiefest musicians push the envelope for the type of music that's typically booked at Four Corners, playing reggae, world beat and rock. The lineup will be varied but, like Four Corners, all of the bands are amazingly talented.

Question: Will people be able to camp on Reservoir Hill for Indiefest?

Answer: Yes, in that sense the two festivals are alike. Indiefest, like Four Corners, will also feature a free children's program, free admission for kids 12 and under, a beer and wine garden, arts and crafts vending and a food court.

The FolkWest staff like to say that Indiefest is our alter-ego festival - proof that we enjoy many different kinds of music. Indiefest will allow us to bring this music to our audience, providing a venue for artists that we like but who just don't "fit in" with the Four Corners format.

Hopefully this clears up any confusion you might have about what to expect at FolkWest's newest musical festival.

Public Property, who will play on Sunday, June 11, may have the distinction of being the first reggae band to play Pagosa Springs. The band started out in 2003 as a simple trio. In a very short time, they built a huge local following in their native Iowa and a growing Midwest following through their work ethic and love of creating fresh music.

Public Property's sound is an original hybrid of the best '60s and '70s Jamaican reggae mixed with modern hip hop influences, Hawaiian music, soul music, dancehall, funk and ska. Songs like "Power Trip" highlight the band's love of ska music, utilizing the full acoustic sound of the ukulele while sending a message over a catchy progression. That style is contrasted with the reggae/hip hop vibe of the title track "What's Goin Down," mixing a one drop with hip-hop rhythms and rhymes. Songs like "Never Again" and "Choo-Choo" hem closer to the style of early Jamaican reggae. Basically, if it's funky, if it's got a groove, chances are they dig it.

Musically the band achieves their sound by making a cohesive whole out of a nine-piece band; making the textured finish of a song bigger than its individual parts. Harmony is highlighted in almost every song. Public Property's three female vocalists often get credited with sounding like Marley's I-Threes, though they sing solos, rap, dance and write. Half of the rhythm section sings. The result of this discipline - bringing all the parts together - is that each member of the group contributes to, rather than dominates, the song, making the whole finished product more driving and soulful.

Besides their trademark fresh mix of styles and emphasis on harmony and female vocalists, Public Property is often praised for their songs' lyrical content. The name and the message of Public Property are practically one and the same, promoting peace, nonviolence, social action and knowledge to uplift the community. Although the songs are often searing, social messages put to a driving groove, the band's lyrics and sound range from angry confrontation to lover's rock, soul reggae to party skank, hip-hop flow to soca sun. The mix of sounds and emotions in the music of Public Property not only provide a church for the choir, but a house for the party.

Tickets to Indiefest are on sale in downtown Pagosa Springs at Moonlight Books. Tickets and information are available by calling 731-5582 or online at www.folkwest.com.

Teen Center welcomes new coordinator

New Teen Center Coordinator Rhonda LaQuey begins her duties this week.

One of LaQuey's first priorities is growing the Youth Advisory Council, which had its first meeting Saturday. "All interested teens are invited to participate in the Y.A.C.," said LaQuey. The Y.A.C. will plan dances, do fund-raising, and provide input to the Teen Center Advisory Board. The next Y.A.C. meeting is scheduled after school Friday, April 28, at the Teen Center.

Former coordinator Jen Stockbridge and her husband, Zack, left for North Carolina Wednesday. "As excited as we are to move on to the next phase of our lives, Zack and I are sad to leave Pagosa Springs," said Jen. "I have every confidence that this community will continue to rally around the Teen Center, support it, and celebrate as it blossoms."

Stockbridge and LaQuey have been busy passing the baton. "There's so much for me to share with Rhonda in such a short time. Fortunately, she's a very quick study," said Jen. Rhonda's new husband, Kevin LaQuey, will help out at the Teen Center, joining a dedicated contingent of weekly and special event volunteers.

For more information on the Teen Center or to volunteer, contact Rhonda LaQuey at 264-4152, Ext. 31, or at pagosateencenter@centurytel.net.

Did the Chinese 'di scover the world' in 1421?

By William F. Wetzel

Special to the PREVIEW

"The Year China Discovered the World."

By Gavin Menzies.

New York: Morrow, 2003. ISBN 0-06-053763-9.

In 1421 the Chinese Emperor Zhu Di dispatched his trusted eunuch admiral Zheng He with a great fleet of seaworthy mahogany Junks to go forth and explore the world "Spreading the benefits of Chinese culture and tradition to civilize faraway peoples."

At that time, the Chinese treasure fleets were the largest and the most technologically advanced in the world. Gavin Menzies demonstrates that Zheng He and his vice admirals visited India, Africa, and proposes they discovered America, Antarctica, Australia, circumnavigated the globe, and charted these vast areas seventy years before the voyage of Christopher Columbus.

Gavin Menzies is a layman, not an accredited professional historian or a scholar of Chinese history. He is an engaging author, amateur historian and a retired UK submarine captain, who undoubtedly has a vast knowledge of maritime charts, navigation, and the winds and currents of the oceans. His research spanned a period of 15 years, visiting more than 120 countries and 900 hundreds of museums. The results of his research is an absorbing account of the time of Emperor Zhu Di, the known and supposed voyages of the Chinese trading fleets, and the evidence that supports his suppositions.

Menzies' research produced conclusive evidence of Chinese voyages and trading with the East Indies, India, Arabia, Japan, and the East Coast of Africa for an extended period of time. Proving that the fleets circumnavigated and visited the rest of the world is a much more challenging task. In 1423 the fleets returned, but Emperor Zhu Di had lost the Mandate of Heaven, died, and a new emperor and dynasty took control of China. China turned inward for the next four hundred years and the majority of the records of the fleets' voyages were destroyed, the ships dismantled or left to rot, and further voyages prohibited.

The treasure fleets of 1421 sailed with more than a hundred ships which included ships for grain, fresh water, horses, livestock, military troops and warships with cannon. The human contingent included hundreds of sailors, soldiers, farmers, diplomats and their concubines, craftsmen and artisans. Only one out of ten ships returned. Menzies says the rest could possibly be found as wrecks and their personnel left on far shores to intermix with the indigenous populations. He supposes the explorers would have gathered and traded plants, seeds, and animals, erected stone markers, left votive offerings and mapped their explorations. The author presents interesting but by no means compelling arguments for his suppositions. All Menzies puts forth is possible but the evidence does not yet prove that in 1421 the Chinese "discovered the world."

The author promises further substantiation of his suppositions by additional evidence to be posted on the Web site 1421.tv. DNA from plants and animals, carbon dating organic compounds found in dwellings and structures, and analysis of shipwrecks and artifacts would go far in proving the Chinese accomplished the voyages Menzies describes. Proof could be forthcoming and change the western understanding of the history of the world.

Anyone interested in history, nautical lore, China, and exploration would find this book interesting.

William Wetzel is a part-time Pagosan who is an avid skier and fly fisherman.

Full schedule of kids' events at library

During the next several weeks, there will be a wonderful variety of opportunities for kids _ toddlers to teens _ at our library programs.

I have the opportunity to offer a number of events in conjunction with other groups here in our community. It is exciting to be able to work with these people to provide more extensive and exciting programs.

Your first opportunity is tomorrow, April 14, in the children's room of the library from 1:30 to 3. This program is for all preschoolers. As a part of The Week of the Young Child there will be continuous storytelling sessions. We will also offer art/coloring activities for the children. Drop in anytime during this time frame and join in the fun. We'll be doing stories related to bunnies, Easter and baby animals.

Our regular "Read with your baby" session is 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 18, for moms and tots up through age 2. Come hear a story, find new ways to encourage language with your little ones, and enjoy conversation with other parents, grandparents and caregivers.

The "big event" next week will take place Saturday, April 22, as we celebrate Earth Day with the Forest Service. (This will take the place of our normally scheduled Friday Afternoon Library Club.)

As you can see, we have not yet begun the landscaping of our library's front yard, and kids of all ages will have a chance to help us get started. The plan is for a mini field trip to a close-by area where each person will pick out his/her own special rock to be part of a path at the library. Upon returning to the library, everyone will paint a handprint on their rock. The rock will be placed alongside a path in the yard.

Just think: Way in the future, these kids will be able to return to the library and find their handprints.

Weather permitting, a hydrologist from the Forest Service will be on hand to show us how earth and rock dams are built. The dam that will be built will be flooded with water as a demonstration. We will begin this exciting day at 10 a.m. Watch The PREVIEW for final details or call the library (264-2209) next week for more information.

Rounding out the month of April, the regular preschool story hours will be held Tuesday, April 25, and Wednesday, April 26. There are always great stories and an art activity at these sessions. This past week, preschoolers heard bunny stories and made bunny headbands.

I want to thank the Pagosa Pretenders Family Theatre for their April program _ a Saturday morning dramatization and reading of "Pamela Camel" by Bill Peet. Four of our talented local actresses, Don Ford and Carol Anderson and her family, provided a lot of fun and a ride through the library on a train for those who attended. For those of you who missed this event, remember The Pretenders perform for you the second Saturday of every month at 11 a.m. In May, the group will be performing in conjunction with the Play in the Park Day sponsored by Seeds of Learning. You will hear and read more about this event as May 13 approaches.

Find a table captain and buy a ticket

"Table captain" sounds like a figure in some sort of culinary warfare.

However, in this case, a table captain is someone who has committed to sell the tickets to fill his or her table of eight at the annual Archuleta County Education Center's "Making a Difference" luncheon Wednesday, April 26.

If you haven't already been contacted by one of these cheerful captains, you may call the center for information at 264-2835. The $45 ticket/donation goes directly toward helping support the varied and vital programs offered by the Archuleta County Education Center.

Keynote speaker will be Dave DeForest-Stalls, who went from playing defensive tackle for the NFL Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys and the Los Angeles Raiders, as well as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, to becoming president and CEO of Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Colorado after years of dedicated, innovating and award-winning work with young people.

This very elegant affair, catered by JJ's Upstream restaurant, will be held at the First Baptist Church on U.S. 160, beginning at 11:45 a.m.

Education News

Sponsors lining up for Make a Difference luncheon

A big "thank you" goes out to everyone who has already agreed to be a sponsor for our fifth annual Making A Difference Luncheon to be held Wednesday April 26.

Sponsors so far this year include: Aspen Tree Animal Caring Center, Appraisal Services Inc., Bank of Colorado, Bank of the San Juans, Circle T Lumber/Ace Hardware, BootJack Ranch, Century 21/Wolf Creek Land, Citizens Bank of Pagosa Springs, Great Divide Title, Harmony Works Juice Bar, Old West Press, Pagosa Brat, Pagosa Photography, Pagosa Veterinary Clinic, Jann C. Pitcher Real Estate, Jim Smith Realty, Rio Grande Savings and Loan, Samurai Academy, The Tile and Carpet Store, Jack and Katy Threet, Ruby Sisson Library, Wells Fargo Bank and Wolf Creek Rod Works.

This year's luncheon features Dave De Forest-Stalls, president and CEO of Big Brothers and Sisters of Colorado as the keynote speaker. This dedicated, dynamic youth worker initially gained national recognition as a defensive tackle for the NFL Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys and the Los Angeles Raiders.

The luncheon will be held at the First Baptist Church on U.S. 160. The program will include not only the keynote address by De Forest-Stalls but also talks by local students. The students will be describing their personal experiences in educational programs sponsored by The Education Center.

Lunch is being catered by JJ's Upstream and tickets are $45 each and can be purchased at The Education Center located at 4th and Lewis streets. Call 264-2835 for more information or to purchase tickets for the event.

First Aid/CPR classes

The next Wilderness First Aid and CPR class is April 24-27. Cost for this class is $80.

Our next Standard First Aid and CPR classes will be offered at the Education Center May 9 and 10. Cost is $35 for first aid, $30 for CPR or $45 for both classes.

New class offered

Designing Successful Web sites will be offered Mondays and Wednesdays April 24-May 17. Cost for this class is $96 (eight sessions).

For information about any of these classes, call the Archuleta County Education Center at 264-2835.

Local Chatter

'Seussical' another smash hit at high school

Our high school production of "Seussical the Musical" this past weekend was great.

It moved audiences to recurring wild applause and Texas bravos (yahoos!). Our magnificent PSHS theater was a disco-glitter ball of Dr. Seussian sets, costumes, and a rainbow of stage magic.

This show put a kind of crown on this past decade-plus of wonderful local musical production in our little town. As is incredibly usual around here, all the leads were star quality, chorus and dance stirring to the max, and this orchestra downright impeccable!

Pagosa is bountifully blessed with a cadre of performance teachers and directors and a motherlode of youth talent. "Seussical" was like a crowning, a phoenix rising of this concerted heart and brilliance. Let this be a reminder to you appreciators of American musical theater: Pagosa is a vibrant hub.

The musical talent in Pagosa is nourished and used with remarkable direction, but now we are going to lose Melinda Baum who has accepted the job as musical director for the Westcliffe, Colo., school system. She will be a full-time teacher, starting a choir in the high school and teaching K-5 every other day. The classes are one-hour each. Westcliffe is west of Pueblo.

Fun on the Run

From an old cookbook:

A man was sitting in a restaurant chewing on a chicken leg. He turned to the woman at the next table, pointed to the bottle of sauce and said, "Please pass the liniment, this old crow has rheumatism."

Wine Whisperer

Yellow Tail stands out in a crowded wine store.

The colorful kangaroo leaps across eye-catching labels that utilize bold colors in striking contrast against black lettering. Launched in 2000 to fill a very specific value-oriented need in the American wine market, Yellow Tail has become the No. 1 imported wine in the U.S .and one of my very favorite best buy wines.

I discovered the leaping roo in spring of 2002 when I worked at a local liquor store. The Cabernet was one of the top 10 bestselling wines in the store that year and I was personally converted, although Cabernet is not a grape that I normally gravitate to, preferring Shiraz and Australian red blends.

I recall leaving a bottle of the Cabernet as a Christmas gift for my vacationing landlord, then sneaking back into his house before he returned to take it back for myself. (I'm sure I eventually replaced it. With something else.)

I believe the Shiraz-Cabernet was another personal favorite over the long, cold, snowy southwestern Colorado winter of 2002-2003.

One of my favorite things about wine is the variation in character from vintage to vintage and Yellow Tail is no exception. I love that I never know which of the bottlings will be my personal favorite for the year until I taste them all in fairly rapid succession.

Last fall, when the air turned crisp and it was The Time of the Year to Start Drinking Reds Again, I was browsing in a liquor store and came upon the Yellow Tail 2005 Shiraz-Grenache. Who could resist that hot pink and black label? Who would not leap at the chance to taste a new product that sounded like a very promising blend of 80 percent Shiraz and 20 percent Grenache? It became my house wine for fall/winter/early spring, '05-'06.

In the selfless spirit of Wine Whisperer service, I sampled the Cabernet, Merlot, Shiraz and the Shiraz-Cabernet, just to be sure I could proclaim my choice so decisively. I took two of the handy 1.5-liter bottles of Shiraz-Grenache to Thanksgiving dinner at a friend's. Though a purist, Yellow Tail Shiraz fan, she was converted.

In my mouth, the 2005 Yellow Tail Shiraz-Grenache is all about semi-sweet raspberry chocolate. Smooth on the palate with just the right balance between the tart berry jammy fruit acids and the slightly sweet chocolate/spice aftertaste. The tannins are mild and it lingers a moment with a lovely, medium-bodied finish. I have yet to tire of this selection and I've been drinking it for months. An open 1.5 liter bottle stays decent for up to three days on the north side of the kitchen counter and averages $15.

Mountain life was rolling along wonderfully one day last fall: I was secure in the knowledge that I had a couple of glasses of the Shiraz-Grenache left at home for sipping by the fire, but I thought I might want a white wine for the baking of chicken breasts.

I wandered into the liquor store not knowing what I'd walk out with; I am not overly-fond of overly-oaked Chardonnays, from any wine growing region. I thought I might grab a bottle of the Yellow Tail Chardonnay, recalling it to be relatively palatable, but I walked out with the 2005 Yellow Tail Pinot Grigio with the gorgeous green label.

Pinot Grigios are an "iffy" wine choice for me. While I demand assertive acids and fruit-driven, lively and zesty characteristics in my white wines, Pinot Grigios often cause an acid-reflux-like reaction in my delicate esophagus that feels something like unsweetened grapefruit juice heading the wrong direction.

Not here: The wine danced across my mouth and exploded into song. I e-mailed a wine-loving friend in New York: "Twice the fruit (citrus and sweet stone) and half the grapefruit seed acid reflux of most Pinot Grigios. You will love this wine. That is no guess. It's got the peach and pear intensity of a Riesling but the citrus-sharp fizz and bite of lime, much like a Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand or Australia."

Both of these wines are food friendly to the max. My food pairing motto is usually "Drink what you love, the food will follow." I pair the Shiraz-Grenache with anything and everything and have yet to regret it. I also love this wine before and after dinner _ it is just that smooth all alone. The Pinot Grigio has the crisp acid structure to compliment a wide array of dishes including grilled and cream-sauced seafood and poultry; Alfredo, carbonara and pesto pastas; Thai and Chinese selections.

Honorable Aussie mentions

These two Shiraz offerings also hail from South Eastern Australia and, while lighter in body and lacking the complexity of the Yellow Tail products, they are very decent food wines for the buck.

Little Penguin Shiraz 2004. I had read so much great press about this wine in both print and online reviews that I figured it'd be something I'd flip over. I figured wrong. Upon first tasting, I found the wine to be thin and lacking in fruit. I got confused. And then I got hungry. And then I had some cheese and a Caesar salad. And then I realized that this is just one of those wines that needs food to really shine. Food coaxes the cherry/berry fruits to reveal themselves more fully and richly, and while it's still a bit underwhelming, you probably won't regret the $8 investment.

Peace Family Vineyard Shiraz 2004. Won't knock your socks off, but for under $8 it won't make you regret the purchase either. I would have preferred more concentration in the fruit department, but it was nicely balanced, if a bit delicate. A wine for sipping before dinner and a nice accompaniment to casual food. Like the Little Penguin Shiraz, this is a great bottle to bring along to a potluck or picnic as it's sure to please, or at least not offend, many in the group.

Community Center News

Rummage sale a success, get ready for Post Prom Party

The annual spring rummage sale, held last week, was a great success.

Twenty-five vendors sold a variety of items. A follow-up survey will help us determine how to make next year's sale even bigger and better _ maybe we'll even change the name to "Flea Market."

Thanks to all the vendors and the community for support and help in making this such a big success.

Post prom party

Coming in just two weeks _ the Post Prom Party.

This yearly event, sponsored by the community center under the teen center program, will happen Sunday, April 30, from 1-5 a.m. The party's purpose is to provide a free, fun experience for Pagosa's youth, while maintaining a safe environment.

Entertainment will include a DJ, a hypnotist, a coffee bar, food, casino-type games, and giant inflatables. Watch this space as other, new attractions are added to the list. There will also be electronics and cash prizes given away; the prom party committee has arranged to have a laptop computer as the grand prize through the generosity of the Pagosa Springs Association of Realtors. Thanks, too, to the many individuals and businesses who have donated to this event.

Spring Fling dance

Pam Stokes, the community center's dance committee decorations chairman, has outdone herself. She and her assistant, Janet Nordmann, have wonderful table decorations planned for the next CC-sponsored dance 7:30-10:30 p.m. April 21. Come see our "blooming" tables.

Tickets are just $5 per person in advance and $8 at the door and are available at the community center and at WolfTracks. As usual, we will reserve tables for parties of 8-10. We will also be taking reservations at the center for seats at our new singles tables.

A jitterbug demonstration will be given by Deb Aspen and Charles Jackson of the InStep Dance Club. KWUF is providing a DJ, and as usual we will have a cash bar with beer and wine. We promised to have a much better selection this time. Snacks are free. This dance is for folks 21 and over; ID's may be checked at the door. Call the center at 264-4152 for more information.

ebay Club

We're happy to announce another new group: A meeting place for all of you who already use eBay or would like to learn.

The kickoff meeting will be held at the center at 9 a.m. April 20. Call Ben Bailey at 264-0293 or the center at 264-4152 for more information. This group is not affiliated with eBay Inc.

Arts and crafts show

Mark your calendars: This opportunity for local artists and artisans to display and sell their handiwork is scheduled for 3-6 p.m. Friday, May 26, and 9-4 Saturday, May 27.

Space assignments are being made on a first-come, first-served basis. The cost is $40 for an 8x8 space and $50 for a 10x10 space, including one 3x6 table. Proceeds from this show will be used to benefit community center programs and to defray operations costs. Call 264-4152, Ext. 21, to reserve your spot.

Sewing classes

Do you know all about bobbin tension? Enclosed zig-zag seams? Adjusting paper patterns?

Maybe you should call us and get yourself on the list for Cecelia Hopper's sewing classes. A small but enthusiastic group met Saturday, April 8, for the first class session, at which Cecelia also offered some handouts about necessary equipment for pressing, sheer and silk fabrics, different types of seams, etc.

This group will meet Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. except for April 15, when there will be no class. Call the center for information.

Line dancing

At 10: on Monday mornings the line dancing group is looking for first-timers, previous failures, or you who are saying, "Gee, I'd like to try that."

This group will be learning beginning basic steps and putting them into very simple dances. It was fun to see the group danced to the music of "New York, New York."

Of, course they were having fun, too. Brave men and timid women welcome.

Then at 10:30, the class moves into more difficult areas in order to challenge the competent. Gerry Potticary, who is the leader of the class, would like to see you on Monday mornings. She promises a good time for all.

Another tip from Gerry: if you can't remember the steps, get in the back row and watch everyone else.

Call Gerry at 731-9734 or the center at 264-4152 for more information.

Scrapbooking

The Community Scrapbook Club meets 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday in the south conference room. Join in to scrap the day away. It's free to anyone who wants to come. There will be a variety of rubber stamps, ink pads, cutting tools, punches and embossing tools provided.

If you have any questions, call Melissa Bailey at 731-1574 or the center at 264-4152.

Cloverbuds

This 4-H activity for 5- to 7-year-olds is led by Lisa Scott and Sabra Miller and meets at the center twice a month. The focus for this series of meetings is the rain forest _ its location, vegetation and animals. Each time, a lively bunch of kids arrives at the center for stories, crafts and a surprise activity. Call Lisa at 264-2730 for information about 4-H enrollment.

German cooking class

Karin Osmialowski will be providing the next in our series of cooking classes.

She writes, "to cook with friends for friends. Under this slogan, I will cook 'what Germany eats' and will incorporate culinary delights from various travels to other European countries into the menus." The first class, to be held April 20, will focus on this slogan. Call the center at 264-4152 to reserve your place at the table. There will be a $10 charge for each class.

Computer lab news

We are continuing to gather names for the beginning classes starting in June. There are still spaces in both the Tuesday class and the Wednesday class for seniors. Each series of classes lasts eight weeks, starts at 10 a.m. and finishes at noon.

A number of people have asked for an intermediate class which I hope to start in May. Those who have made the request want a more in depth look at subjects such as computer security, using your computer for listening to the radio and making phone calls, moving files and directories, and handling e-mail attachments. Call the center for details.

Upcoming events

Please consider volunteering.

Aug. 11 _ Around the World in Pagosa. This event will feature a parade of traditional costumes and tastes of food from different countries. We need men, women and children to participate. Volunteers will represent a country and display the traditional costume of that country. Others will sell foods that represent the different countries. More details to follow. Volunteers can call Mercy at 264-4152, Ext. 22.

Oct. 21 _ Hunters' Ball. This will be a dinner and dance fund-raiser for everyone, but especially for hunters. All kinds of volunteers are needed, such as women dressed in early 1800s costumes, groups to perform short, funny melodramas, or businesses to sell souvenirs and gifts. More later.

December _ Festival of Trees. We are looking for individuals, families or groups to sponsor trees which will be decorated and displayed for a week at the center; the trees will be on public display. There will be a nominal entry fee for each tree. At the end of the week, all trees will be auctioned off and the money will go to a non-profit organization, chosen by the tree's sponsor. More information later.

Center hours

The center is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10-4 Saturday.

Activities this week

Today _ Over-the-Hill Hoopsters, 8-9 a.m.; AARP Free tax help, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; yoga, 11-12 noon; computer Q&A session with Becky, 1-4 p.m.; Teen Center open, 4-8 p.m.; Chimney Rock pot luck, 5-9 p.m.; volleyball, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Leading Edge/Small Business Development, 6-9 p.m.; basketball practice, 7-10 p.m.

April 14 _ Seniors' walking program, 11:15-11:35 a.m.; open basketball, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; senior bridge, 12:30-4 p.m.; Cloverbuds, 1:30-3 p.m.; Teen Center open, 2-8 p.m.; CC rummage sale, 3-6 p.m.; UC Denver foster parent meeting, 5-9 p.m.; ManKind project, 7-9 p.m.

April 15 _ UC Denver foster parent meeting, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; drawing class with Randall Davis, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; tee-ball, 9-10 a.m.; girls' softball parents meeting, 10-11 a.m.; Pagosa Scrapbook club, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Alzheimer's Association workshop, 6-8 p.m.; Teen Center open , 11 a.m.- 4 p.m

April 16 _ Church of Christ Sunday service, 9 a.m.-noon; Grace Evangelical Free Church service, 10 a.m.-noon; United Pentecostal Church service, 2-4 p.m.; volleyball, 4-6 p.m.

April 17 _ Line dancing, 10:30 a.m.-noon; seniors' walking program, 11:15-11:35 a.m.; senior bridge, 12:30-4 p.m.; Teen Center open (poker), 4-8 p.m.; tee-ball, 5:30-6:30 p.m.; tee-ball, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

April 18 _ Over-the-Hill Hoopsters, 8-9 a.m.; photography with Wendy, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Beginning Computing skills, 10 a.m.-noon; seniors' walking program, 11:15-11:35 a.m.; Teen Center open (Uno Attack!), 4-8 p.m.; volleyball, 6-8 p.m.; Echo Ditch Co. business meeting, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Isogenetics nutritional information and sales, 7-9 p.m.

April 19 _ Beginning Computing skills for seniors, 10 a.m.-noon; Wednesday bridge club, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; watercolor club, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; preschool play group, 11 a.m.- noon; Teen Center open, 4-8 p.m.; Weight Watchers, weigh-in at 5 p.m., meeting at 5:30; tee-ball, 5:30-6:30 p.m.; photo club, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; TOPS comprehensive planning meeting, 6-9 p.m.; tee-ball, 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Church of Christ Bible study, 7-8 p.m.

April 20 _ Over-the-Hill Hoopsters, 8-9 a.m.; photography with Wendy, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; eBay club, 9-10 a.m.; Aus-Ger club, 10 a.m.-noon; yoga, 11 a.m.-noon; computer Q&A session with Becky, 1-4 p.m.; Teen Center open, 4-8 p.m.; Laser seminar with Dr. Moore, 7-9 p.m.

Need a place to have a party or meeting? We have very affordable rooms for small, mid-size and large groups. A catering kitchen is also available. Tables, chairs, a portable stage, a dance floor and audiovisual equipment are available, too. The center is located at 451 Hot Springs Blvd. Call 264-4152.

Senior News

Seniors warned to guard personal information

A man trips and falls while carrying a dish into the house from the barbecue and is injured.

He is transported to a local medical facility for treatment of a fractured hip.

On that same day, a woman is having her annual physical exam.

The doctor's question to both is the same: "Do you consume alcohol, and if so, how many drinks do you average per day?"

It may surprise you that an alcoholic may answer the same as the typical occasional drinker. Maybe one or two drinks a day is a common answer. The doctor, suspecting that alcohol may be a factor in an accident or health condition, may ask how many drinks the patient had already consumed that day. Again the typical answer for an alcoholic would be in the range of a couple of drinks. An alcoholic will generally lie about the number of drinks consumed because alcohol has become a dependable friend and doesn't want to do anything that may jeopardize that relationship.

Jerry is a married construction supervisor and admits to being an alcoholic. He goes home after work. He finds that his wife, who also holds an outside job, is not home yet. It's been another hard day at work, and the only thing on his mind is how good a cold beer would taste on a hot summer day. The first beer tastes great, and there's another cold one waiting. He grabs another, and another, and may end up at the local bar that evening with the guys swapping lies, and good times.

He doesn't realize that his best friend, alcohol, has gotten the best of him again. If he's lucky, his wife will show up and take him home. The next morning, he's back on the job, driving workers to the job site, still impaired from his drinking the previous night. Not only is he jeopardizing his own safety, but that of his coworkers and other drivers.

Be aware that DUI defendants in Colorado can be charged with DUI (driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs or a combination of the two), or DWAI.

Colorado DWAI, which stands for Driving While Ability Impaired, is a lesser-offense, where the person's blood alcohol level (BAC) is .05 or higher.

March is alcohol Abuse Month. Alcohol and substance abuse is statistically at epidemic proportions among the elderly and remains for the most part unreported, undiagnosed and ignored. The reasons that substance abuse by our senior citizens goes undetected vary, but it generally has to do with the fact our elderly are no longer active in mainstream society and there is simply no one around to notice. They are less likely to get stopped for driving under the influence, having a traffic accident, or causing problems in the community. Therefore, they have little contact with the police or criminal justice system. Many are retired, so there is very little chance their drinking will cause them to lose a job or career.

Basically, nobody notices a senior who is an alcoholic.

A Canadian study indicates that a high percent of elderly patients who end up getting treatment for a history of binge drinking began drinking heavily in mid or late life. The study also found that women are even more likely to start heavy drinking later in life. Most drinkers who started late feel socially isolated and/or may have physical health problems. Many are affected by grief or loss, and others by housing, marital, and mental health problems.

Substance abuse among the elderly is a growing problem for the healthcare industry. One study found that substance abuse-related cases cost more to treat because they require almost 26 percent more hospital staff and other resources than conditions that are unrelated to substance abuse.

Because substance abuse related cases tend to be more expensive to treat than the average hospital case, the amount actually paid out by Medicare for substance abuse-related care accounted for one quarter of the total Medicare payments for hospital care, according to the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University.

As Baby Boomers reach senior citizen status, carrying with them habits and patterns of behavior developed in the 1960s and 1970s, the situation could develop into a healthcare crisis. Already, more than one third of seniors over the age of 65 in our country drink alcohol and 10 percent of them abuse alcohol.

Caregivers, whether they are family members, friends or professional staff, should be aware of the signs of alcohol abuse in a senior citizen. Many times the first indication of a problem of alcohol abuse with a senior citizen is observed during a visit, or they call a family member or friend due to a fall or other emergency.

The American Medical Association reports that part of the problem is getting doctors to accept that elderly alcoholics exist. On a national level, the community and caregivers often turn a blind eye to the problem and accept it as a condition of aging, a reaction to loss or grief.

On a local level, it has been my experience that doctors are aware of the level of alcohol abuse in our senior citizen community. They take an active roll in identifying alcohol problems and will assist patients in getting patients pointed in the right direction for help needed to treat the problem. Elderly alcoholics tend to respond well to treatment, and stay in programs.

For information on finding a treatment center, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Their web site can be found at www.hhs.gov/. There are 32 treatment centers within 100 miles of Pagosa Springs, including one treatment center in town associated with the National Organization for Recovering Alcoholics. The counseling Center Individual Group and Family accepts Medicaid patients and will adjust fees dependent on income. Other treatment centers can be found in the yellow pages of area telephone directories. Call them to find out what treatment they offer and if they adjust fees based on income levels.

Are you a target?

Seniors are perceived by con artists as more vulnerable than those in younger age groups.

Seniors tend to be more trusting and charitable and are more often home so they can be easily reached.

Generally, as people progress into their senior years they are not as knowledgeable about financial and legal matters.

The most important rule to remember is to resist sharing your personal information with anyone without asking these questions: Why do they need this information? What are they going to do with it?

You may be able to get by with disclosing less information than requested in situations you feel comfortable with, such as the last four digits of your social security number, instead of providing the entire number. If you don't feel comfortable about giving out personal information, then don't give it out. It's your personal information, and it's your choice whether to share it or not. You may not get the service you are requesting, but sometimes it's better to go without. Go with your gut feeling.

If you need a second opinion, contact Musetta at The Den, and she will help get you pointed in the right direction.

Medical shuttles

A shuttle service to Durango for medical appointments is available through Archuleta County Senior Services. This service is available to adults of all ages and will get you to and from your non-emergent medical appointments.

In most cases, service can be provided with 48 hours advance notice. The round-trip fare is $30 or less with rates varying depending on the number of passengers. If you are a 2006 member of Archuleta Seniors Inc. your fare is $10. Our mini-van is unable to accommodate wheelchairs.

Call Musetta at 264-2167 for further information.

For cancer patients needing transportation for cancer treatment, the American Cancer Society provides free round-trip transportation to Durango. For information, contact the Durango office at 247-0278.

Tax deadline

Today, April 13, is the last day that the AARP sponsored Tax-Aide program will assist tax payers in preparing their federal and state tax returns. This year, many people benefited by this free assistance AARP program. On behalf of the Silver Foxes Den, we extend our gratitude to the volunteers who made this service possible.

Seniors Inc.

Seniors Inc. memberships for folks age 55 and over can be purchased at The Den for $5 on Mondays and Fridays, 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. and Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9-11 a.m. No memberships will be sold Thursdays.

Your Seniors Inc. membership entitles you to a variety of discounts from participating merchants in our area, plus you'll get senior activity discounts. Membership also entitles those who meet annual income guidelines to scholarships for eyeglasses, hearing aids, dental, prescription drugs and medical equipment. Archuleta Seniors, Inc. will also pay up to $20 for medical shuttles handled by The Den. Join now and acquire the benefits for 2006.

Senior Prom

It's time to kick up those heals to celebrate the arrival of spring.

A great place to celebrate the season is at the senior "Senior Prom" at the high school Sunday, April 30.

The high school junior class leaves all the decorations in place from the high school senior prom the night before, so all you have to do is buy a ticket in advance at The Den and show up at 6 p.m. to celebrate A Night in Paris.

This is an Archuleta Seniors, Inc. event, so the money goes to help Archuleta seniors in need of medical assistance and other worthwhile services and activities. Appetizers will be served, photos taken, corsages and boutonnieres provided, and a king and queen crowned. Tickets are now on sale for $5 per person and cannot be purchased at the door.

Home delivered meals

The Den provides home delivered meals to qualifying homebound individuals who want the benefits of a nutritional lunch.

The Den's caring volunteers deliver the meals to homes Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, while taking the time to check in with the individuals served. The appetizing lunches are served hot and ready to eat. Whether you want a meal delivered one or four times a week, we can accommodate your needs. For more information, call Musetta at 264-2167.

Spring Holiday Party

The Spring Holiday Party and Hat Day is almost here, so mark April 14 on your calendar. Come for lunch and see what treats Peter Cotton Tail has left for you. There will be Easter eggs, chocolates, prizes and fun for all.

It is also Spring Hat Day and there will be a prize for the most creative spring hat. Come join us for laughs and celebration for the young at heart.

Senior board meeting

Archuleta Seniors, Inc. (ASI) Board of Directors meet every second Friday of the month to discuss topics of interest. Agendas are posted at the county courthouse and in the dining room of the community center prior to the meeting. We welcome the public to participate in our meetings.

Medicare counseling

The May 15 deadline for enrolling in the Medicare Prescription Drug Program is fast approaching, with only one month left. If you wait until May to enroll, and need assistance in finding the best prescription drug program, you may not be able to get an appointment. Enroll early and avoid the 1-percent penalty per month.

For information and appointments, contact Musetta at 264-2167.

White Cane Society

The white cane is a symbol of the blind citizens in our society. Last year, in a proclamation, President George W. Bush stated that "blind or visually impaired Americans are valuable and contributing members of our society and many use a white cane to help them succeed at school, home, or work." The white cane is a symbol of the blind citizens in our society.

In this country, the introduction of the white cane has been attributed to Lion's Clubs International. In 1930, a Lion's club member watched a blind man crossing a busy street using a cane painted black. The thought occurred to him that it would be easier to identify a blind person and see the cane if such canes were painted white. In 1931, the Lion's Club began a campaign promoting the use of white canes for persons who were blind. During the 1930s, the white cane began making its way into government policy as a symbol for the blind. In 1930, the first White Cane Ordinance was passed in Peoria, Ill. It granted blind pedestrians protections and the right-of-way while carrying a white cane. Other states followed suit. In 1964, by a joint resolution of Congress, the President of the United States was authorized to issue annually a proclamation designating October 15 of each year as "White Cane Society Day."

Our local White Cane Society meets at The Den ay 11 a.m. April 19. You are invited to join this support group.

Thank you

The Den thanks Mary Davis for her gift of lap quilts, Richard Harris for donating magazines and Genelle Macht for the greeting cards.

Senior of the Week

We congratulate Della Truesdell as last week's Senior of the Week, Della will enjoy free lunches all week.

Card games

The Silver Foxes Den provides three card-game activities each week.

On Mondays and Fridays you will find Bridge 4 Fun being played in the arts council room of the community center. The Den hosts this fun outing from 12:30 -4 p.m. There are several tables set up for players, especially during summer months when part-time residents and summer visitors come to The Den.

The other card game is Canasta, played Tuesdays at 1 p.m. in The Den's lounge area. If you're looking for something to do during one of those afternoons, come play cards and if there's another game you'd like us to schedule please let us know.

Activities at a glance

Today - ARP tax assistance by appointment only, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Friday, April 14 - Qi gong, 10 a.m.; gym walk, 11:15 a.m.; Easter party and Spring Hat Day, noon; Bridge 4 fun, 12:30 p.m.; Seniors, Inc. board meeting, 1 p.m.

Monday, April 17 - Medicare counseling, 11 a.m. by appointment; gym walk, 11:15 a.m.; Bridge 4 Fun, 12:30 p.m.

Tuesday, April 18 - Yoga in Motion, 10 a.m.; gym walk, 11:15 a.m.; blood pressure checks, 11:30 a.m.; Canasta, 1:00 p.m.; Sky Ute Casino, 1 p.m. by signup at The Den.

Wednesday, April 19 - Basic Computers, 10 a.m.; White Cane Society Group, 11 a.m.

Thursday, April 20 - Arboles Meal Day by reservation; $1 birthday lunches.

Friday, April 21 - Qi Gong, 10 a.m.; gym walk, 11:15 a.m.; Bridge 4 Fun, 12:30 p.m.; free movie, "A League of Their Own," 1 p.m.

Menu

Suggested donation $3 for ages 60-plus and kids 12 and under; all others $5.

Salad bar every day _ 11:30 a.m. except in Arboles.

Thursday, April 13 _ No meal served.

Friday, April 14 _ Crunchy baked fish, mashed potatoes, mixed veggies, pineapple mandarin, orange compote and whole wheat bread.

Monday, April 17 _ Baked ham with raisin sauce, candied sweet potatoes, green bean amandine, cranberry mold and whole wheat roll.

Tuesday, April 18 _ Chicken fajitas with tortilla, lettuce and tomato, cilantro rice, cooked cabbage with red pepper and red grapes.

Wednesday, April 19 _ Sloppy Joe on bun, scalloped potatoes, broccoli and carrots and apple.

Thursday, April 20 _ Arboles Meal Day: American lasagna, herbed green beans, seasoned cabbage, Italian roll and peaches.

Friday, April 21 _ Beef Stew with crackers, herbed green beans, whole kernel corn and diced pears.

Veteran's Corner

Non-service connected disability pensions

Non-Service Connected Disability Pension is a VA benefit program that provides financial support to wartime veterans having limited income.

The amount payable under this program depends on the type and amount of income the veteran and family members receive from other sources.

Countable Income

Monthly payments are made to bring a veteran's total annual income (including other retirement and Social Security income) to an established support level. (Unreimbursed medical expenses may reduce countable income.)

Let me say right off, no one is going to get rich on this VA Pension benefit. For 2006, the pension amount for a single veteran is $10,579. For a married veteran the Pension is $13,855. For each child, add $1,806.

Aid and attendance

For a veteran requiring aid and attendance the amount is $17,651. Married veteran A&A Pension is $20,924. Veteran housebound is $12,929 and married, $16,205. Amount for each child is the same as above, $1,806.

Remember, these are the maximum amount of allowable gross incomes as outlined above.

Wartime service

A veteran applying for a pension must be a wartime veteran. That is, he must have served in the military during a wartime period as defined by the VA. Generally speaking this, of course, includes the conflicts in the Gulf War, Vietnam, Korea, World War II and so on.

Generally, the veteran must have 90 days or more of service, of which at least one day must have occurred during a period of war, and the veteran must have been discharged under conditions other than dishonorable.

Permanent disability

Additionally, the veteran must have a disability that VA evaluates as permanent and total. I won't go into exact detail on all of these parameters, but obviously if you're a robust, healthy, working-age veteran temporarily out of a job, you probably won't qualify for this benefit.

Apply again

If a veteran applied for this benefit at some time in the past and was turned down because their income was above those previously mentioned thresholds, and the veteran's combined income is now significantly less, they may apply again for the benefit.

Share-A-Ride

Don't forget to call or stop by my office with your VA health care appointments for the Share-A-Ride program. Help a fellow veteran who may be going in the same direction to the same VA facility. Give me a call if you can provide transportation or need transportation. I will keep a calendar of who is going where to coordinate this important program.

Durango VA Clinic

The Durango VA Outpatient Clinic is located at 400 South Camino Del Rio, Suite G. Phone number is 247-2214. Albuquerque VAMC phone number is (800) 465-8262.

More information

For information on these and other veterans' benefits, call or stop by the Archuleta County Veterans Service Office located at 46 Eaton Drive, Suite 7 (behind City Market). The office number is 731-3837, fax number is 731-3879, cell number is 946-6648, and e-mail is afautheree@archuletacounty.org. The office is open from 8 to 4, Monday through Friday. Bring your DD Form 214 (Discharge) for application for VA programs, and for filing in the VSO office.

                                                                                                                   

Library News

Trekking through our Cadillac Desert Š

This week's continuation of our education about water in the Southwest includes another showing of the documentary, "Cadillac Desert," at 1 p.m. at the senior center Tuesday and Wednesday.

If you missed seeing the four-part video last week, you might want to catch it this week, especially after Dr. Gulliford's interesting presentation last Saturday.

Then, this Saturday, April 15, we have a panel discussion at 3 p.m. at the library. Be sure to come and hear our local experts speak.

Carrie Campbell, PAWSD manager, has worked for the district since 1982. Kelly Palmer, a hydrologist for the U.S. Forest Service and the BLM has worked on water quality and water rights issues on public lands in Colorado, Utah, Oregon and Idaho. Water Commissioner Val Valentine has a degree from University of Colorado in environmental conservation, has been with the Colorado Division of Water Resources since 1987, and is in his 26th year of working on irrigation issues. He also is a freelance writer and authored a delightful little book that we have in the library, "The Great Durango and Silverton Train Robbery."

There will be plenty of time for questions about local water matters.

National Poetry Month continues

C. P. Cavafy, the most famous Greek poet of the last century, was Greek by birth but lived in Egypt most of his life.

His "day job" was in the irrigation section of the Ministry of Public Works, (OK, are any of our water speakers night poets? Fess up.). He wrote historic and erotic poems with a range of reference that is fascinating.

Cavafy was Jacqueline Kennedy's favorite poet. Being the lover of culture and pomp that she was, she pre-planned her funeral as a grand event, one part of which included her companion Maurice Tempelsman reading all of Cavafy's "Ithaka". The poem begins:

"As you set out for Ithaka

hope your road is a long one,

full of adventure, full of discovery.

Laistrygonians, Cyclops,

angry Poseidon _ don't be afraid of them

you'll never find things like that one on your way Š"

It's a wonderful poem, but I have to tell you, it reminds me of Dr. Seuss's book, "Oh the Places You'll Go." Jackie might not have agreed, but even she might have laughed.

Cavafy's most famous poem is "Waiting for the Barbarians." It is in "The Collected Poems of C.P. Cavafy," which is on order. You can call and place a hold if you want to be notified when it comes in.

Y tambien, muchas gracias

The Supper Fellowship of Community United Methodist Church just awarded the library a nice grant, from the result of their Christmas wreath benefit, to help us build our Spanish language collection.  We thank them and are very pleased to have help in beginning to develop a collection that will answer our needs in many directions.

You might be surprised to know that the Sisson Library's language collection is very heavily used. Our foreign language tapes are almost always checked out, and I've had requests for books-on-tape in Spanish. This gift will help us afford to order those, some bilingual books, and perhaps other materials in Spanish.

I have continuing requests for programs in French and Spanish. People in this community are interested in either learning, or continuing their education, in these languages, through what I will, for lack of research at the moment, call Montessori language school for adults. Shall we learn to cook in French? Shall we learn to garden in Spanish?  Let's _ then we can all get together and work on our languages, regardless of level, with bilingual books. Stay tuned for further announcements on this effort.

I have several books at home that have Spanish or French on one page and English on the other. This makes reading into a thought provoking exercise: judgment of the translation. "Scandals in Translation," which I picked up in a used bookstore in Los Angeles, raised my consciousness of this subject. Borges, the great South American writer, fired his translator of five years because he felt he was not being interpreted correctly. If that is so for Borges, how am I to trust the translations I read? Bilingual books are very intriguing puzzles if you know even a little of a language.

And, a rousing cluck, cluck, cluck of a cheer for Margaret Wilson,  who has once again provided the library with a darling basket full of knit chickens, sitting on eggs. They are for sale at the front desk, and proceeds go to benefit the Library. Thanks for all you do for the library Margaret! We really appreciate you!

Storytelling at the library

On Friday, April 14, from 1:30 to 3 p.m., there will be a storytelling session for preschoolers at the library. This event is in conjunction with the celebration of Week of the Young Child.

Arts Line

PSAC gallery schedule set, fund-raiser coming soon

The Pagosa Springs Art Council has set the schedule at the Town Park Gallery, with 10 shows upcoming in 2006.

Shows include artwork from students, professional artists and aspiring artists. Media represented in the show include oils, watercolor, photography, wood working and others. Show opening receptions will be posted in this column, as show dates approach.

The PSAC 2006 Town Park Gallery schedule is:

April 27-May 17 - Pagosa High School Student Show.

May 18-June 7 - PSAC Juried 2007 Calendar Exhibit.

June 8-27 - PSAC Watercolor Club Exhibit.

June 29-July 19 - Juried Art Show.

July 20-Aug. 9 - PSAC Instructor's Art Show: Denny Rose and Ginnie Bartlett.

Aug. 10-30 - PSAC Pierre Mion Students Show.

Aug. 31-Sept. 20 - Artwork by Sandy Applegate.

Sept. 21-Oct. 11 - PSAC Wood Object and Furniture Show.

Oct. 12-Nov. 1 - PSAC Juried Photo Show.

Nov. 2-23 - PSAC Gift Shop (with PSAC members' artwork).

Support PSAC fund-raiser

Are you an artist new to Pagosa Springs? PSAC is seeking donated items for a silent auction to be held June 3.

Donating artwork for our silent auction provides free exposure of your work to our community.

Local businesses can keep their names out in the public with their auction donations and gift certificates, and show their support of art in Pagosa Springs with a donation.

Items can be delivered to the Town Park Gallery or a PSAC member will arrange for an item pickup the week of April 17.

For more information, contact PSAC at 264-5020.

PSAC's silent auction and general membership meeting will be held 5-7 p.m. Saturday, June 3, at the Pagosa Springs Community Center. The event is open to the public with tickets priced at $15 (PSAC members) and $20 (nonmembers). Ticket price includes food and beverage. A cash beer and wine bar will also be available.

Over 40 percent of the PSAC budget is derived from fund-raising events and your support is needed to keep the arts thriving in Pagosa Springs. Many PSAC members have generously donated their artwork, providing the public a wonderful array of art for purchase.

Contact PSAC at 264-5020 for your advance ticket purchase.

Get out of your slump

It's time to wake up and market your business!

What business hasn't experienced a marketing slump? Perhaps it could be because of personal challenges, lack of motivation, the competition has a new service, technique, product, or maybe there's just more competition in Pagosa (and surrounding area) these days.

Pagosa Springs Arts Council presents a series of four marketing workshops, "Falling Forward: Web Site Marketing & Logistics" and "The Secret of Your Success: Marketing Your Biz," to be held April 18 and 20. The series is specifically directed toward artists, but would also benefit any business. Each session's information stands alone and sessions may be attended individually or as an entire series. All sessions will be held at the arts room in the Pagosa Springs Community Center.

As series presenter, I realize the marketing dilemma for artists and small businesses, as I have been in those same trenches. For more than 25 years, I've continued to operate a thriving photography, graphic design, marketing consulting, marketing and photography workshops, and Web site design business. My business and artistic talents have given me ultimate success in an industry where most fail and I will present my successful strategies in this jam-packed, two-day marketing series in Pagosa Springs.

Barring catastrophic events, businesses just don't dive into a "marketing slump." Marketing slumps can occur even when things are going well and you feel you can "coast." The problem is you cannot coast uphill. Successful businesses don't wait to start their marketing ascent, as they know the longer they wait - the harder the climb!

"Falling Forward: Web Site Logistics" (session one) is April 18, 9:30 a.m.-noon.

Artists create great art and may even offer exceptional services, but how do they let everyone know it?

Creating and producing effective marketing for artists doesn't happen by accident. The public is increasingly turning to the Web as a quick source of information, working 24 hours for businesses. We'll deal with authentic Web site setup, design, and how to implement and market themselves through the Web's low cost in their business operations. Whether you have a site or are thinking about a site, this session will give you new ideas on how to fine-tune your site. Web site knowledge is not required when attending this session. And, if you are Web savvy, this session will spur you toward the next creative level.

Topics for the morning session include: Obtaining a Site, Setting a Web Site Budget, Hosting Resource and Fees, Registering a Site (Name), Sectioning Your Site, Web Editors (Front Page), Pre-Designed Sites, Creating "User-friendly" Sites, Choosing Images and Information for Your Site.

"Falling Forward: Web Site Updating and Front Page" (session two) is April 18, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

In marketing, you have to look forward and think ahead. This afternoon session will satisfy the attendee's need to gain more knowledge of how to update (or set up) a Web site. I will demonstrate the Web editor software Microsoft Front Page as a means to easily manage and change your site information. If you are familiar with Microsoft Word, then you can easily use Front Page.

In simple terms, Front Page is the word processing format (software) for the web. Surround yourself with others who have a desire to learn how to manage their own Web sites. This session will give participants a better knowledge of Web sites, providing them with a better ability and understanding when a need arises to communicate with Web site designers. Topics for this afternoon session include: Creative Ideas to Market Your Site, Getting the Client to Your Site, Creating Repeat Site Traffic, Site Hit Number Strategies, E-Commerce, Co-op Sites, and Additional Site Links.

"The Secret of Your Success: Marketing Your Biz With Print Media" (session three) is April 20, 9:30 a.m.-noon.

When was the last time you broadened your print marketing habits? This session will help businesses fine-tune their marketing activities and target their customers more efficiently.

During this session, learn marketing failures and successes for large and small, new and established businesses. Learn more about how to grow your business. I will share those winning strategies and give participants the opportunity to interact and focus marketing efforts. Marketing is the true success for any business, including artists.

As a special bonus, resource vendors will be offering special marketing discounts to participants, allowing them to not only focus their marketing dollars but to also gain more marketing dollars to spend. Topics include: Print media (post cards, PR PACS, brochures), Press Releases, Coupons, Artist/Company Bio, Web Site Marketing, PR Images for Your Business, Self Printing Verses Professional Printing. Each participant will receive a free sample packet of successful marketing materials.

"The Secret of Your Success: Different Perspective Marketing Mix" (session four) is April 20, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

When it comes to spending marketing dollars, everyone is looking for the magic formula.

This marketing session is not about what's always right or wrong; it's about a different perspective.

Lining up your work passion with a keen marketing strategy will breed that "magic formula" for the marketing dollar. You may not be particularly good at coming up with marketing options on your own. This afternoon session focuses on the Perspective Marketing Mix for businesses. Highlights of the session include: Creating Print Marketing (Professional Design and Software Options), Implementing a Web Site, Media Resource List, Newspaper, Direct Mail, E-mail Marketing, Networking, Client Follow-up, and Company Branding.

This exciting marketing series is available to PSAC members and the general public. Advanced registration by April 7: Individual sessions are $45 for PSAC members, $55 general ($65 after April 7). Full-day sessions are $85 PSAC, $95 general ($105 after April 7). For advance registration and further information, call me at 264-4486 or visit www.wendysaunders.com and pagosa-arts.com.

Photo club Web seminar

The Pagosa Springs Photography Club will meet 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in the arts room at the community center. This month's program is Web Site Design and Maintenance.

Topics discussed will include: Web site logistics: setting up a site; using a Web editor (front page to load and work on your site); adding images and products to the site (scanning to digital files, using digital files); hiring the right Webmaker; designing and maintaining the site yourself with a template; hosting pricing options and resources; and marketing your site (getting people there and search engine logistics).

Prior Web site experience is not necessary, as Web site information will be broken into easy-to-understand material. The presentation will include an evaluation of a series of sites, discussing pros and cons. This free presentation is especially tailored to persons who want to gain Web site knowledge either to work with a site, create a site, or communicate with others maintaining a site.

Photo competitions are held at each club meeting. The two competition categories are the theme category and the open category - where any subject is permitted. This month's them is "green." Members may enter one print in each category. Ribbons are awarded in each category to the top three prints as voted by the members during the meeting.

The photography club meets the second Wednesday of each month from September through May. Interested photography enthusiasts are welcome to attend the first meeting at no charge. Any and all are invited to join for a modest annual fee.

For more information, contact club president Jim Struck at 731-6468 or jim@perfassoc.com.

PHOTOlearn® kids' arts camps

Parents are always searching for creative summer camp options for their children.

PSAC is excited to announce a special art camp, PHOTOlearn®, July 17-20 for youngsters ages 5-10.

I will be the presenter in this a series of children's PHOTOlearn®' classes, held at the Pagosa Springs Community Center. I've covered life's events as a photojournalist for more than 25 years, and I'll share my knowledge with aspiring child photographers. I hold a B.F.A. from Virginia Commonwealth University in communications arts and design and I have spoken numerous times at professional photography conventions and was featured as the one of 12 wedding photographers in Wedding 2000, a live video cast program in 1998. My cowboy and rodeo images have appeared in American Cowboy Magazine and western images will be featured in the Greeley Independence Stampede Art Show in 2006.

The series of photography PHOTOlearn® class sessions is a special opportunity for children to learn with a real working professional. Space is limited to 15 students. There are two sessions (total of four days) offered. Students may attend two or four days, with budget pricing for those attending all four days.

The two-day session fee is $145 (PSAC members $125). The four-day session fee is $195 (PSAC members $155). A second child is $95 /$125. The fee includes all materials, disposable cameras or film, and image processing. Participants should wear sunscreen and hats, as we'll be photographing outside (water bottles provided). Preregister for the summer camp by April 17 and save $10 per session.

For more information and registration, call me at 264-4486 or visit www.wendysaunders.com and www.pagosa-arts.com.

Using A Disposable Camera to Document Your Vacation or Holiday, session 1 - July 17-18.

We will begin this PHOTOlearn® session (8:30 a.m.-noon) with a brief history of photography and cameras.  I'll share with participants a variety of vintage and modern day cameras. Students will also explore how photographs began and the cameras that were used.  Actual vintage tintype photographs will be shown. 

Then, the children will learn techniques to take better images with a disposable camera.  Indoor and outdoor photography will be discussed and photographed.  Focusing distance and flash coverage ranges will be tested by each student and their camera.

Cameras will be collected for overnight processing. Images processed from the previous day's shoot will be critiqued.  Students will have the opportunity to interact concerning one another's images through the critique process.  Participants will have the opportunity to review and discuss their images, including image composition.  After the critique session, students will design their photograph album.  Students will again photograph with another camera using the skills discussed.  Cameras will be collected for overnight processing.

Using A Disposable Camera to Document Your Vacation or Holiday, session 2 - July 19-20, 8:30 a.m.-noon.

The day will begin with a critique session of the previous day's shoot.  After the critique session, students will add images to their photograph album. Students will then select their best images for mounting and framing.  Cropping and composition will be discussed.  Students will mount and frame at least two images.  In addition, students will select images from their previous shoots to make special occasion cards.

Parents will be invited to review a gallery of images at the end of the second day and join students for a pizza lunch. Students will leave the PHOTOlearn® camp with all their images and negatives and the art experience of photography.

Get to know the artist

If you are a PSAC member and would like to be featured in our upcoming, weekly "Get to know the artist," send your bio, photo and up to six samples of your work for review. Format requirements: (Bio: Microsoft word file. Images: jpeg format, 300 dpi / up to 4x5 inches, or pdf file). For consideration, your information should be presented in CD format and mailed to Wen Saunders, PSAC, P.O. Box 4486, Pagosa Springs, CO 81157.

For more information, call Wen Saunders, 264-4486. Of course, if you are not a PSAC member, perhaps you should be. Visit our Web site, pagosa-arts.com, or call 264-5020 for membership information.

Watercolor club

The PSAC Watercolor Club, (formed in the winter of 2003) meets at 10 a.m. the third Wednesday of each month in the arts and craft space at the community center. The next meeting will be held April 19.

Watercolorists of all levels are provided the opportunity to use the room for the day. Each attending member contributes $5 for use of the space. The goals for the day vary, with watercolorists getting together to draw, paint and experience technique demonstrations from professional watercolorists or framers. Participants are encouraged to bring still lives or photos to paint and draw, or a project to complete. Attendees should bring a bag lunch, their supplies and a willingness to have a fun, creative day.

For more information, contact PSAC at 264-5020.

Drawing with Davis

Drawing class with Randall Davis takes place the third Saturday of every month at the community center. The next class will be held 9 a.m.-3 p.m. April 15.

Subjects vary month to month and all levels of aspiring artists are welcome. Attending each month is not necessary, since each session is focused on different subject matter. This is a wonderful opportunity to experience your creative talent together with the guidance of a talented professional.

Attendees should arrive with a large sketchpad, a few drawing pencils (preferably a mid-range No. 2 or 3 and a No. 6 (bold and hard leads), ruler and eraser. Participants should bring a bag lunch (soda machines available). Fee is $35 to PSAC members and $40 for nonmembers. For further workshop information, contact Davis at 264-2833. Reservations should be made by calling PSAC, 264-5020.

Time to join

PSAC is a membership organization that helps ensure a flourishing and diverse community by enriching lives through the arts.

The privileges of membership include involvement in membership activities, involvement in the community, socializing and participating in the camaraderie of the arts, discounts on PSAC events and workshops, recognition in Artsline and listing in PSAC Artist Guide and PSAC Business Guide. Workshops and exhibits are sponsored by PSAC to benefit the art community. In addition, your membership helps to keep art thriving in Pagosa Springs.

Membership rates are: Youth, $10; Individual-Senior, $20; Regular Individual, $25; Family-Senior, $25; Regular Family, $35; Business, $75; Patron, $250; Benefactor, $500, Director, $1,000; Guarantor, $2,500 and up.

Volunteer at gallery

The PSAC Gallery in Town Park is on winter hours: Tuesday and Thursday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Voice mail and e-mail are checked regularly, so please leave a message if no one is available in the office.

If you are a PSAC member and would like to volunteer hours working at the gallery, call PSAC at 264-5020 for a listed of openings. Hours worked at the gallery may be used to attend PSAC workshops throughout the year.

Upcoming events

All PSAC classes and workshops are held in the arts and craft space at the community center, unless otherwise noted.

All exhibits are shown at the PSAC Gallery in Town Park, unless otherwise noted.

April 12 - Pagosa Photo Club, 5:30 p.m. Program topic featuring Web site design and maintenance for small businesses.

April 15 - Drawing with Randall Davis, 9 a.m.

April 17 - Deadline for donation to PSAC silent auction.

April 17 - Preregistration discount deadline for PSAC PHOTOLearn® classes and kids' camp.

April 18 - PSAC "Falling Forward: Web Site Logistics," 9:30 a.m.-noon.

April 18 - PSAC "Falling Forward: Web Site Updating & Front Page," 1:30-4:30 p.m.

April 19 - Pagosa Springs Watercolor Club, 10 a.m.

April 20 - PSAC "The Secret of Your Success: Marketing Your Biz With Print Media," 9:30 a.m.-noon.

April 20 - PSAC "The Secret of Your Success: Different Perspective Marketing Mix," 1:30-4:30 p.m.

April 27-May 17 - PSAC Pagosa High School Student Show.

Artsline is a communication vehicle of the Pagosa Springs Arts Council. For inclusion in Artsline, send information to PSAC by e-mail (psac@centurytel.net). We would love to hear from you regarding suggestions for Artsline. Events in surrounding areas will be included when deemed of interest to our readers.

Judges needed for PSAC juried shows

The Pagosa Springs Art Council announced its Town Park Gallery schedule for the 2006 season last week, listing ten upcoming shows.

Shows include artwork from students, professional artists and aspiring artists. Media represented in the show include oil, watercolor, photography, wood working, and others.

Judges are needed for two juried shows: the PSAC Annual Juried Fine Art Show (June 29-July19) and the PSAC Annual Juried Photo Show (Oct. 12-Nov.1). Judges should be available two days prior to the show opening for judging. Perspective judges should live outside Archuleta County. Anyone interested should submit a resume, and three samples of their work. Past judging experience is helpful.

Persons interested in judging these shows (or future shows) should contact me at 264-4486 for more information. I will include information about the juried shows and artists' entry information in next week's article.

Web marketing

Local businesses and artists have a unique opportunity to increase their Web site and marketing awareness through a series of seminars, sponsored by PSAC.

It's time to wake up and market your business!

What business hasn't experienced a marketing slump? Perhaps it could be because of personal challenges, lack of motivation, the competition has a new service, technique, product, or maybe there's just more competition in Pagosa (and surrounding area) these days.

Pagosa Springs Arts Council presents a series of workshops, "Falling Forward: Web Site Marketing & Logistics" and "The Secret of Your Success: Marketing Your Biz," to be held April 18 and 20. The series is specifically directed toward artists, but would also benefit any business. Each session's information stands alone and sessions may be attended individually or as an entire series. All sessions will be held at the arts room in the Pagosa Springs Community Center.

As series presenter, I realize the marketing dilemma for artists and small businesses, as I have been in those same trenches. For more than 25 years, I've continued to operate a thriving photography, graphic design, marketing consulting, marketing and photography workshops, and Web site design business. My business and artistic talents have given me ultimate success in an industry where most fail and I will present my successful strategies in this jam-packed, two-day marketing series in Pagosa Springs.

Barring catastrophic events, businesses just don't dive into a "marketing slump." Marketing slumps can occur even when things are going well and you feel you can "coast." The problem is you cannot coast uphill. Successful businesses don't wait to start their marketing ascent, as they know the longer they wait _ the harder the climb!

"Falling Forward: Web Site Logistics" (session one) is April 18, 9:30 a.m.-noon.

Artists create great art and may even offer exceptional services, but how do they let everyone know it?

Creating and producing effective marketing for artists doesn't happen by accident. The public is increasingly turning to the Web as a quick source of information, working 24 hours for businesses. We'll deal with authentic Web site setup, design, and how to implement and market themselves through the Web's low cost in their business operations. Whether you have a site or are thinking about a site, this session will give you new ideas on how to fine-tune your site. Web site knowledge is not required when attending this session. And, if you are Web savvy, this session will spur you toward the next creative level.

Topics for the morning session include: Obtaining a Site, Setting a Web Site Budget, Hosting Resource and Fees, Registering a Site (Name), Sectioning Your Site, Web Editors (Front Page), Pre-Designed Sites, Creating "User-friendly" Sites, Choosing Images and Information for Your Site.

"Falling Forward: Web Site Updating and Front Page" (session two) is April 18, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

In marketing, you have to look forward and think ahead. This afternoon session will satisfy the attendee's need to gain more knowledge of how to update (or set up) a Web site. I will demonstrate the Web editor software Microsoft Front Page as a means to easily manage and change your site information. If you are familiar with Microsoft Word, then you can easily use Front Page.

In simple terms, Front Page is the word processing format (software) for the Web. Surround yourself with others who have a desire to learn how to manage their own Web sites. This session will give participants a better knowledge of Web sites, providing them with a better ability and understanding when a need arises to communicate with Web site designers. Topics for this afternoon session include: Creative Ideas to Market Your Site, Getting the Client to Your Site, Creating Repeat Site Traffic, Site Hit Number Strategies, E-Commerce, Co-op Sites, and Additional Site Links.

"The Secret of Your Success: Marketing Your Biz With Print Media" (session three) is April 20, 9:30 a.m.-noon.

When was the last time you broadened your print marketing habits? This session will help businesses fine-tune their marketing activities and target their customers more efficiently.

During this session, learn marketing failures and successes for large and small, new and established businesses. Learn more about how to grow your business. I will share those winning strategies and give participants the opportunity to interact and focus marketing efforts. Marketing is the true success for any business, including artists.

As a special bonus, resource vendors will be offering special marketing discounts to participants, allowing them to not only focus their marketing dollars but to also gain more marketing dollars to spend. Topics include: Print media (post cards, PR PACS, brochures), Press Releases, Coupons, Artist/Company Bio, Web Site Marketing, PR Images for Your Business, Self Printing Verses Professional Printing. Each participant will receive a free sample packet of successful marketing materials.

"The Secret of Your Success: Different Perspective Marketing Mix" (session four) is April 20, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

When it comes to spending marketing dollars, everyone is.

PHOTOlearn® kids' arts camps

Parents are always searching for creative summer camp options for their children.

PSAC is excited to announce a special art camp, PHOTOlearn®, July 17-20 for youngsters ages 5-10.

I will be the presenter in this a series of children's PHOTOlearn®' classes, held at the Pagosa Springs Community Center. I've covered life's events as a photojournalist for more than 25 years, and I'll share my knowledge with aspiring child photographers. I hold a B.F.A. from Virginia Commonwealth University in communications arts and design and I have spoken numerous times at professional photography conventions and was featured as the one of 12 wedding photographers in Wedding 2000, a live video cast program in 1998. My cowboy and rodeo images have appeared in American Cowboy Magazine and western images will be featured in the Greeley Independence Stampede Art Show in 2006.

The series of photography PHOTOlearn® class sessions is a special opportunity for children to learn with a real working professional. Space is limited to 15 students. There are two sessions (total of four days) offered. Students may attend two or four days, with budget pricing for those attending all four days.

The two-day session fee is $145 (PSAC members $125). The four-day session fee is $195 (PSAC members $155). A second child is $95 /$125. The fee includes all materials, disposable cameras or film, and image processing. Participants should wear sunscreen and hats, as we'll be photographing outside (water bottles provided). Preregister for the summer camp by April 17 and save $10 per session.

For more information and registration, call me at 264-4486 or visit www.wendysaunders.com and www.pagosa-arts.com.

PHOTOlearn® Shutterbug Series

The unfortunate truth about photographs is that the picture we often see is not the picture we get!

The human eye sees differently than a camera, and it's our job to compensate to get the picture we see.

PSAC announces a series of PHOTOlearn® photography sessions designed for practical shutterbugs. I will conduct these workshops.

The solution to better images is a simple understanding of photography and it normally takes no more effort than making endless mistakes. PHOTOlearn® (which I created) is a quick option to educate the average shutterbug and avoid wasted time and errors.

Sessions are open to all levels of shutterbugs (film or digital), including high school and college students (who attend for about half price). Five series topics are dedicated to individual two-hour sessions and will be held at the Pagosa Springs Community Center, Art and Crafts Room. Register by April 17 and receive $10 discounts on each session!

The sessions are:

_ 35mm camera operation _ July 10, 6-8 p.m.

_ Available Light (F-stops/shutter speeds) _ July 11, 6-8 p.m.

_ Electronic flash systems _ July 12, 6-8 p.m.

_ 35mm B&W infrared film _ July 22, 10 a.m.-noon.

_ Processing B&W film _ July 22, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

For more information and registration, call me at 264-4486 (or visit www.wendysaunders.com and pagosa-arts.com).

Watercolor club

The PSAC Watercolor Club, (formed in the winter of 2003) meets at 10 a.m. the third Wednesday of each month in the arts and craft space at the community center. The next meeting will be held April 19.

Watercolorists of all levels are provided the opportunity to use the room for the day. Each attending member contributes $5 for use of the space. The goals for the day vary, with watercolorists getting together to draw, paint and experience technique demonstrations from professional watercolorists or framers. Participants are encouraged to bring still lives or photos to paint and draw, or a project to complete. Attendees should bring a bag lunch, their supplies and a willingness to have a fun, creative day.

For more information, contact PSAC at 264-5020.

Support the auction

Are you an artist new to Pagosa Springs?

Donating artwork for our silent auction provides free exposure of your work to our community.

PSAC is seeking donated items for its silent auction. Local businesses can keep their name out among the public with their auction donations and gift certificates, and show their support of art in Pagosa Springs at the same time. Items may be delivered to the Town Park Gallery or a PSAC member will arrange for an item pick-up the week of April 17.

For more information, contact PSAC at 264-5020.

PSAC's silent auction and general membership meeting will be held 5-7 p.m. Saturday, June 3, at the Pagosa Springs Community Center. The event is open to the public with tickets priced at $20. Ticket price includes food and beverage. A cash beer and wine bar will also be available.

Over 40-percent of the PSAC budget comes from fund-raising events and your support is needed to keep the arts thriving in Pagosa Springs. Many PSAC members have generously donated their artwork, providing the public a wonderful array of art for purchase.

Contact PSAC at 264-5020 for your advance ticket purchase.

Get to know the artist

If you are a PSAC member and would like to be featured in our upcoming, weekly "Get to know the artist," send your bio, photo and up to six samples of your work for review. Format requirements: (Bio: Microsoft word file. Images: jpeg format, 300 dpi / up to 4x5 inches, or pdf file). For consideration, your information should be presented in CD format and mailed to Wen Saunders, PSAC, P.O. Box 4486, Pagosa Springs, CO 81157.

For more information, call me, 264-4486. Of course, if you are not a PSAC member, perhaps you should be. Visit our Web site, pagosa-arts.com, or call 264-5020 for membership information.

Time to join

PSAC is a membership organization that helps ensure a flourishing and diverse community by enriching lives through the arts.

The privileges of membership include involvement in membership activities, involvement in the community, socializing and participating in the camaraderie of the arts, discounts on PSAC events and workshops, recognition in Artsline and listing in PSAC Artist Guide and PSAC Business Guide. Workshops and exhibits are sponsored by PSAC to benefit the art community. In addition, your membership helps to keep art thriving in Pagosa Springs.

Membership rates are: Youth, $10; Individual-Senior, $20; Regular Individual, $25; Family—Senior, $25; Regular Family, $35; Business, $75; Patron, $250; Benefactor, $500, Director, $1,000; Guarantor, $2,500 and up.

Volunteer at gallery

The PSAC Gallery in Town Park is on winter hours: Tuesday and Thursday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Voice mail and e-mail are checked regularly, so please leave a message if no one is available in the office.

If you are a PSAC member and would like to volunteer hours working at the gallery, call PSAC at 264-5020 for a listed of openings. Hours worked at the gallery may be used to attend PSAC workshops throughout the year.

Upcoming events

All PSAC classes and workshops are held in the arts and craft space at the community center, unless otherwise noted.

All exhibits are shown at the PSAC Gallery in Town Park, unless otherwise noted.

April 15 _ Drawing with Randall Davis, 9 a.m.

April 17 _ Deadline for donations to PSAC silent auction.

April 17 _ Preregistration discount deadline for PSAC PHOTOLearn® classes and kids' camp.

April 18 _ PSAC "Falling Forward: Web Site Logistics," 9:30 a.m.-noon.

April 18 _ PSAC "Falling Forward: Web Site Updating & Front Page," 1:30-4:30 p.m.

April 19 _ Pagosa Springs Watercolor Club, 10 a.m.

April 20 _ PSAC "The Secret of Your Success: Marketing Your Biz With Print Media," 9:30 a.m.-noon.

April 20 _ PSAC "The Secret of Your Success: Different Perspective Marketing Mix," 1:30-4:30 p.m.

April 27-May 17 _ PSAC Pagosa High School Student Show.

May 8-10 _ PSAC Pierre Mion Watercolor (Figure) Workshop, 9a.m.-4p.m.

May 11 _ PSAC Pierre Mion Watercolor (Figure) Workshop, 9a.m.-4p.m.

May 10 - Pagosa Photo Club, 5:30 p.m.

May 17 - Pagosa Springs Watercolor Club, 10 a.m.

Artsline is a communication vehicle of the Pagosa Springs Arts Council. For inclusion in Artsline, send information to PSAC by e-mail (psac@centurytel.net). We would love to hear from you regarding suggestions for Artsline. Events in surrounding areas will be included when deemed of interest to our readers.

Food for Thought

An appetizing option

It's spring break.

La Jolla, California.

Dead-center eye of the pretense perfect storm, southern California style.

I fit right in.

Feel real comfy, as a matter of fact.

There are more trophy homes, trophy autos and trophy wives packed into two square miles in the Village than just about anywhere on the globe. Granted, a lot of the wives are graying a bit, but they still require frequent and costly maintenance. The guys, too, from the look of it. The local newspaper is supported by cosmetic surgery ads. The cellulite sucked out of thighs and rear decks in this little burg could plump the entire population of a Third World nation.

Kathy and I are booked into a swell hotel _ one we have stayed in each spring for quite a few years. It is a "boutique hotel" _ i.e. more expensive than it should be, simply because it is labeled a "boutique hotel."

We have been here less than 24 hours.

I am out of money.

But, I'm comfy. Everything here is draped with pretense.

My financial condition makes me one of the most unusual creatures in the Village at La Jolla _ right along with that haggard gal wrapped in newspapers who sits on a bench on Girard Avenue shouting warnings about signals from alien spacecraft and eating cigarette butts.

Yep, it's her and me. Oddities. Hand and glove.

To be truthful, I am not exactly broke. After all, I am an American and, thus, I have credit cards. The companies dole them out to just about anyone (maybe even the gal on Girard Avenue).

So, just like the federal government, in step with our behaviorally challenged president and Congress, I can increase my debt with abandon.

What me worry? If it works for George W., it works for me.

Big time.

At somewhere between 7 and 13 percent.

So, while the extra treats and trips must be held to a minimum, there is plastic to push, food to buy. And I am not about to sacrifice the opportunity to enjoy fine chow to an ill-focused concern about debt and its effects on the future.

Clever fellow and ace economist that I am, I have the answer: Get a table at a fine restaurant (I would say "expensive" but we are in La Jolla, where even an ordinary restaurant is expensive) and low-ball it with a couple glasses of wine, a bevy of appetizers and a shared dessert.

Whammo!

Can't miss, right?

And, besides, it seems chic, doesn't it? I imagine a fellow in scuffed Bass Weejuns and a seersucker sport coat. "Yes, Bitsy and I were bored with the routine, you know? So, we threw caution to the wind and broke stride with the pack. Get this: We ordered several appetizers, some vino, a bit of a sweet for a closer. You should have seen the expression on the faces of the Maitre de and back staff. Priceless, absolutely priceless. I left them thirty percent, just for the fun of it."

Heh, heh.

Come time for the evening meal, Kathy and I set off for George's at the Cove _ one of our faves. Eat in the main restaurant, you need to back an armored car to the door when it comes time to settle the bill. The terrace is another matter. Reminds me a lot of my friend Yale's Isabel's, here in Pagosa _ a varied, but controlled menu with every item well prepared and delectable.

We opt for eats on the rooftop terrace, with a view of the cove and the ocean at sunset.

The waitress approaches the table. "Let me tell you about our specials, first we have aŠ"

I interrupt with an aristocratic wave of a limp hand. "No need, my dear. We're going to order several appetizers and a couple drinks," I say, cavalierly.

"Oh Šyes Š well, I see."

"First off, we'd like the calamari with aioli and the frisée with the roasted pear and goat cheese. Then, next up, bring us the skewered chicken with the poblano relish and tomato foam and a bowl of your house special, smoked chicken and corn soup. Lot's of that fantastic, crusty sourdough bread, too, if you please."

"Ummm Š right."

"And, just to thoroughly smash the mold, a couple glasses of Zinfandel: one for me and one for my charming companion."

The waitress gets a smarty-pants look on her mug, puts a hand on her hip and says: "No doubt that'll be the white zin. Correct?"

Hoo boy, she's spoiling for a fight, now she realizes her tip is glued to some appetizers. But, I don't fall for it.

"Absolutely not. White zin is little more than mouthwash with 13 percent alcohol. Bring us the real thing." I'm acting positively imperious _ the only thing I learned in prep school.

She quickly turns on her heel and hustles off, but I know I've earned her grudging respect.

Haven't I?

A breeze is blowing in off the cove.

"Ah," says Kathy, closing her eyes, tilting her head back and breathing deeply. "The smell of the ocean. I love it."

I detect the odor of dead seal and rotting fish parts, but I play along.

"Mmmm, yes. Nature. Nothing quite like it, as far as I know."

After thirty-four years together, conversation never really sparkles unless there's an argument.

As things turn out, my strategy is a success, foodwise. The appetizers arrive, two at a time. The wine is excellent, and we have two glasses each. We share a dessert _ an afterthought.

Moneywise, however, the story is different. My strategy fails. We spend a ton of money, all things considered.

It gives Kathy something to fret about at the hotel. What kind of vacation would it be if she couldn't gnash her teeth and worry about funds?

Me, I let it go. I've got plastic.

And I begin to ponder the appetizer-only gambit, wondering how it would work on an event planned for a bit later in the spring, at our place.

I buy French wine with a group of friends. The wines are everyday drinkers, at everyday prices _ but with a difference. Through a notorious California importer, we buy these relatively inexpensive wines from artisanal vintners in a condition that puts them, in terms of quality, in a much higher league.

In short, we get really great wines at very low prices.

We've made a few buys now and, next buy, we will probably be up to ten cases or more. Each person will reorder what he or she likes and we'll find a couple new bottles to try.

This next time around, James and I are pondering a get-together at which every participant contributes a bottle (hopefully a different wine from each person) and a nibble to go along with the wine.

There's the trick _ an appetizer that corresponds to the drink.

Sounds pretty darned nice: a variety of small samples of nice wines, a variety of small portions of tasty foods.

Hors-d'oeuvres, if you will. From the French for "outside the meal."

According to the snoots at the Culinary Institute of America, in their cookbook "The Professional Chef," an appetizer should be fresh ("perfectly fresh"), small (a one- or two-bite package), attractive and "designed to complement the meal that is to follow."

In this case, designed to complement the wine that will accompany.

Nothing wrong with all manner of fresh salsas, is there?

How about some potstickers with a dipping sauce?

Paté. A terrine?

Tapenade? Can't beat those Nicoise olives, garlic and capers with a wine from Provence. Got just the wine, too _ a Pigeoulet en Provence. Could be dandy.

Some teensy crab cakes might go well with a white.

Or, how about what I intend to whip up? Little crepes filled with beef and wild mushrooms. Or, maybe the filling wrapped in several layers of phyllo and baked.

For the filling, I'll braise a hunk o'browned chuck until the darned thing falls apart. I'll cook it for hours in a 325 oven with onion, garlic carrot, turnip in beef stock and wine with a bit of crushed tomato and a commotion of thyme, bay leaf, parsley, salt (not too much), pepper, plus a smidge of Espanola red chile or, perhaps, minced chipotle with a teaspoon of the adobo sauce added for good measure.

I'll braise the living daylights out of that piece of cow, until it can be shredded with a fork. At that point, out comes the meat and the sauce is strained.

Meanwhile, I'll slice whatever flavorful mushrooms I can buy without breaking the bank (or the credit card, as the case may be) and I'll sauté them until they lose their moisture and begin to brown. Into the sauce they'll go, over medium heat, along with some additional herbs, garlic, etc. to brighten up the flavor. I'll also toss in a couple tablespoons of veal demi-glace. After the sauce is nearly reduced out of existence, in will go the shredded beef. There should be only enough of the nearly jelled sauce left in the pan to thoroughly glaze the meat.

Crepes? No problemo, except these will be very small. I'll whip up a stack, covering the stack with a towel to keep the crepes from drying out.

A dab of the beef in the center of one of the small crepes _ perhaps a dusting of freshly shaved Parmeggiano-Reggiano _ and the package is rolled up.

Finger food?

You bet. With plenty of napkins handy.

This will go with just about anything I intend to order next time around: all reds _ my favorite Cahors, a Corbieres, a Barbera. Probably with any new option that comes my way.

It will be appetizing, for sure.

The event will be draped with pretense.

I'll fit right in.

Extension Viewpoints

Soil, the key to successful gardening

April 6 - Shady Pine Club meeting, 6 p.m.

April 7 - Cloverbuds at community center, 1:30-3 p.m.

April 7 - 4-H Fridays at Community United methodist Church, 1:45 p.m.

April 7 - Colorado Mountaineers Club meeting, 2:15 p.m.

April 7 - Goat Project meeting, 3:10 p.m.

April 8 - Democratic Assembly.

April 10 - Advanced Archery at Ski and Bow Rack, 4 p.m.

April 10 - Entomology-Group 2 project meeting, 4 p.m.

April 10 - Dog Obedience Project meeting, 4:30 p.m.

April 10 - Swine Project meeting, 6 p.m.

April 10 - Livestock Committee meeting, 6:30 p.m.

April 11 - Rocky Mountain Riders Club meeting, 6:30 p.m.

April 12 - Photography Project meeting at Pagosa Photography, 4 p.m.

April 12 - Entomology-Group 1 project meeting, 4 p.m.

April 12 - Sportsfishing Project meeting, 4 p.m.

April 13 - Vet Science meeting at San Juan Veterinary, 5:30 p.m. Seed potatoes

Orders are being taken for seed potatoes.

As usual, there are two kinds available: Sangre (red potato) and Yukon Gold (white potato).

Yukon Gold potatoes have an oblong tuber shape with buff skin and yellow flesh. They tend to be high yielding and are used for baking, mashing and roasting. Yukon Golds generally have an attractive appearance and a good flavor which make them suitable for many culinary uses.

Sangre potatoes are a round type tuber with dark red skin. They tend to be high yielding and are used mostly for baking, boiling, and for salads. The Sangre was developed in Colorado. They may emerge erratically and tend to develop a slight net in some soils. Sangres store well and have excellent cooking quality.

Currently we are charging 40 cents per pound for both species. To those of you who are just starting out and are experimenting, it is our suggestion that you order two to three pounds of each species instead of ordering a lot of them. This way you can experiment and see if you like them and then order more next year.

When orders arrive at the Extension Office each person will be contacted to pick up their order. If you are interested in ordering seed potatoes call 264-2388, e-mail us at archulet@ ext.colostate.edu or stop by the Extension Office. Orders should be available the second week of May.

Soil and successful gardening

Interest in organic Gardening has been successful largely because the practice encourages the use of organic matter as an amendment, thereby improving soil texture. This, in turn, improves the environment for good root growth and the development of soil microorganisms that make nutrients more readily available. Organic matter also supplies some nutrients, but most forms of organic matter are rather low in amounts when compared with the commercial inorganic sources. From the standpoint of plant use, it makes no difference whether the nutrients are supplied from organic or inorganic sources since the plants can only use the nutrients in the basic inorganic form. The difference is primarily in the availability. For instance, nitrogen from organic sources is released more slowly than from most commercial fertilizers. Slow release of nutrients would be desirable in a soil already adequate in nutritional levels. On the other hand, where soils are deficient in one or more nutrients, it usually is desirable to add commercial, more quickly available fertilizers to correct the deficiency.

Before adding fertilizers to a soil, first determine whether a problem in growing healthy plants is due to nutrition or a physical property of the soil, such as poor texture. A plant in a "tight," poorly aerated soil may do poorly because the root system is unable to utilize the nutrients, even though they may be present in adequate amounts. Amendment with organic matter to "open up" the soil first is more appropriate in this case than adding a commercial fertilizer.

Soil texture and drainage

Soil with a steep slope, while having good surface runoff (often confused with good drainage), may have poor subsurface drainage if the texture is fine (high in clay) or if underlying soils create a barrier to water movement. Water is always held more tightly in fine soils than in coarse, sandy soils. A fine-textured soil underlaid with buried organic matter, sand and even gravel will not drain well. The water will not move through the coarse layer because it is held more tightly in the finer-textured soil above. The best soils for growing plants are uniform in texture throughout the root zone with a good balance of minerals, air and organic matter. Texture Test: Roll some slightly moistened soil between your thumb and forefinger. If it forms a firm ball, feels smooth and becomes sticky when moistened, it is too high in clay. If you cannot form a ball, the soil won't stay together and it feels somewhat grainy, the soil will be of a better texture. If, on the other hand, the soil feels very coarse, it may be too sandy and will not hold an adequate amount of water.

Subsoil drainage test: Dig a hole in the garden area about 12 inches deep and the diameter of a spade. Pour water in the hole to the rim. Refill the hole a day later and observe how long it takes for all the water to soak in. If the water soaks in within a few minutes, the subsoil drainage may be too good. Such soils may not hold enough water to sustain plant life and can loose valuable nutrients through leaching. If the water takes more than one hour to soak in, the subsoil drainage may be poor. Plants may suffer from oxygen starvation (drowning) under these conditions.

Soil amendments

Soil improvement is a continual process. It often takes 10 or more years to make a productive Garden soil. If your soil is too sandy or too high in clay, the solution to both extremes is essentially the same—add organic matter. In a sandy soil, organic matter acts much like a sponge to hold moisture and nutrients. In clay, organic matter helps to aggregate the finer particles allowing for larger pore spaces, thus improving aeration and drainage. It is possible, especially in clay soils, to create a soluble salt problem by adding too much organic matter all at once. The general "rule of thumb" is to incorporate no more than 3 cubic yards of organic matter per 1,000 square feet per year. This is equivalent to 1 1/4 inches of amendment on the soil surface before it is tilled in. All amendments added should be thoroughly tilled into the soil, making it a uniform mixture.

The best organic amendments include relatively coarse, partially decomposed compost and aged barnyard manure. The type of manure is not important, but it should be at least one year old if planting is anticipated soon after amendment. Fresh manure usually is too high in ammonia, which injures plant roots. If the manure has a strong acrid odor, avoid using it or let the amended ground lie fallow for several months before planting. Because of high salts, avoid repeated use of most feedlot manures unless the salts can be leached first. Dairy cattle manure generally is lower in salt content. Coarse sphagnum peat is a good amendment but is expensive when compared with manure or compost. Avoid using the "native" sedge peats unless mixed with coarser material. Most are too fine in texture and can act as a glue, complicating a tight soil situation.

In addition to coarse sand, inorganic amendments include calcine clay products (such as Turface), pulverized volcanic rock (scoria), perlite (heat-treated limestone) and diatomaceous earth. These materials are expensive and feasible only to amend small plots or small amounts of potting soils.

Liquid amendments

Like household detergents, liquid products break the surface tension of water around the soil particle and allow deeper water penetration. They in no way increase the pore space of a soil. The liquid "conditioners," therefore, cannot be considered as soil amendments and are properly called "adjuvants." At best, they may provide a temporary improvement of water penetration but do not break up clay soils as some claim. They are not substitutes for amendments.

What About gypsum?

Gypsum is a salt - calcium sulfate —and when added to calcareous clay soils (the typical high calcium soil in Colorado), does no more than increase the already high calcium content. Thus, gypsum + calcareous clay = gypsum + calcareous clay.

In other words, adding gypsum to a soil that does not need calcium is a waste of money. Also avoid adding gypsum to a saline soil. Gypsum increases salt levels.

The use of sulfur in a clay soil high in calcium also has been acclaimed by some as a method of breaking up a tight soil. While sulfur added in small amounts over a long period of time eventually can improve the soil condition and reduce soil alkalinity, this practice generally is not advised because the sulfur reacting with the calcium simply forms gypsum.

The only soil that can be benefited by adding gypsum is a soil high in sodium, called "sodic soil" or "black alkali." These soils normally are found where there is a high water table and poor drainage. Such soils are hard and cloddy when dry and take water very slowly. Few plants can survive in them.

For more information on soils contact the Extension Office at 264-5931.

Check out our Web page at www.archuleta.colostate.edu for calendar events and information.

Save water, retrofit your yard

April 13 - Cake Decorating Project meeting, 5 p.m.

April 13 - Vet Science meeting, San Juan Veterinary, 5:30 p.m.

April 14 - Office closes at noon.

April 14 - 4-H Fridays at Community United Methodist Church, 1:45 p.m.

April 14 - Colorado Kids Club meeting, 2 p.m.

April 14 - Fair royalty dance practice, 2 p.m.

April 15 - Fair royalty dance practice, 10 a.m.

April 17 - Beginning Archery at Ski and Bow Rack, 4 p.m.

April 17 - Dog Obedience Project meeting, 4:30 p.m.

April 18 - Photography Project meeting Pagosa Photography, 4 p.m.

April 19 - Garden Club meeting, 10 a.m.

April 19 - Sportsfishing Project meeting, 4 p.m.

April 19 - Sheep Project meeting, 6 p.m.

Seed potatoes

Orders are being taken for seed potatoes.

As usual, there are two kinds available: Sangre (red potato) and Yukon Gold (white potato).

Yukon Gold potatoes have an oblong tuber shape with buff skin and yellow flesh. They tend to be high yielding and are used for baking, mashing and roasting. Yukon Golds generally have an attractive appearance and a good flavor which make them suitable for many culinary uses.

Sangre potatoes are a round type tuber with dark red skin. They tend to be high yielding and are used mostly for baking, boiling and for salads. The Sangre was developed in Colorado. They may emerge erratically and tend to develop a slight net in some soils. Sangres store well and have excellent cooking quality.

Currently we are charging 40 cents per pound for both species. We suggest those of you who are just starting out order 2-3 pounds of each species instead of ordering a whole lot of them. This way, you can experiment and see if you like them and then order more next year.

When orders arrive at the Extension Office each person will be contacted to pick up their order. If you are interested in ordering seed potatoes please call 264-2388, e-mail us at archulet@ ext.colostate.edu or stop by the Extension Office. Orders should be available the second week of May.

Xeriscaping: retrofit

Most homeowners don't realize that as much as 50 percent of household water is used for the yard and garden. To lower this amount you can do several things, like changing your turf areas and installing a drip irrigation system.

Survey your yard

Observe turf areas that are difficult to water and maintain. These include places along fences, on steep slopes where water tends to run off, corners of lawns where it is hard to water without overlapping into other areas, narrow strips of lawn between the house and sidewalk or driveway and irregularly shaped lawn areas that do not fit the normal pattern of most sprinklers.

If you have an underground sprinkler system, turn it on and observe where the water sprays. Better yet, place shallow containers, such as clear glasses or tubs, in various locations and measure the water depth after 10 minutes. If some areas don't receive as much water as others, your sprinkler system may require maintenance or renovation to water evenly. Common sprinkler system problems include mismatched nozzles or spray and rotor heads installed on the same zone.

Adjust heads that are spraying concrete. Sprinklers spraying wood fences cause unsightly water staining and rapid deterioration thus increasing financial costs. Relocate sprinkler heads near fences so water sprays towards plants, move heads further away so water doesn't wet fences, or switch to drip.

Steep slopes, especially those on south and west exposures, waste water through runoff and evaporation. Utilizing or installing a control timer that allows for cycle and soak irrigation may solve the problem on gentle slopes. Another idea is to convert these areas to perennials or ground covers that tolerate the exposure and thrive on little water. They also are easier to maintain because unsafe mowing on steep slopes can be eliminated. Drip irrigation that slowly applies water over longer periods of time may further minimize runoff. Another option to consider is terracing. Note that landscape berms where soil is deliberately mounded also waste water from sprinkler runoff. Drip irrigation is a better way to irrigate berms.

Strips narrower than 8 feet are difficult to irrigate effectively. Size areas accordingly. Irregularly shaped areas should be reshaped to fit sprinkler irrigation patterns and odd-shaped areas converted to drip irrigated, xeric plantings or hardscape. Study the highly trafficked areas in your yard including play areas for children and exercise areas for pets. These areas are best left in turfgrasses that can take the wear. Note that bluegrass is one of the best-adapted grasses for wear tolerance. Xeric grasses have less wear tolerance partly because they grow slowly on less water and don't replace worn-off grass. Other areas, however, can be converted to shrub borders, flower gardens and non-turf ground covers that use less water. Designated paths of worn turf may be altered to stepping stones or flagstones, perhaps with a dwarf groundcover planted among the stones.

Look for lawn areas that do poorly because of heavy shade from trees or structures. Rather than keep these areas in turf, plant alternative ground covers that tolerate shade and mulch them. If the location is appropriate, install a patio or raised deck.

Note that turf does play an important role in the landscape when placed in well thought out locations. Turf prevents soil from moving into the air, streams and homes. Turf is the best filter of runoff and scrubs pollutants from water. It builds soil for other plants and is one of the best means of urban fire control.

Remove turf

Mark off unwanted turf areas with a string and stakes or a garden hose. Do not leave sharp angles or small strips that are difficult to water without overlapping into nonturf areas. Modify your sprinkling system so water is applied only to the turf you retain. In some cases, this may involve changing the spray patterns of the heads from a full circle to a partial circle. In other cases, it may require reorienting heads to direct water away from the nonturf areas. Major changes, however, may require installation of in-line shutoff valves or even relocation of complete sprinkler lines. Another method is to let the sprinkler pattern be your guide and renovate areas not covered by the spray pattern.

It is not necessary to strip unwanted sod. An easier method is to apply Roundup to actively-growing grass. Use a spade to cut a slit between turf you want to save and that to be killed. Severing underground roots avoids movement of herbicide spray via the roots to turf designated for retention.

Roundup must be applied carefully, because even the slightest drift onto adjoining grass or other nontarget plants will damage them. Use a low-pressure, coarse-droplet spray with a handheld, cardboard or metal spray shield. Better yet, consider a wick-type applicator available at many garden centers. Apply only when you are certain it will not rain for at least eight hours after application. Wait seven to ten days, and then plant to alternative ground covers, shrubs or flowers.

Another way to kill grass is to overlap black and white newsprint on the lawn you want to kill. Lay the newspaper on the grass in overlapping sections at least 10 sheets thick. Weigh it down with 4 inches of wood chips to keep it from blowing. You usually can purchase wood chips from tree service companies. Sprinkle the chips with water to settle them and keep them from blowing.

The newspaper and wood-chip mulch smothers the grass. After a few weeks the grass will be dead and the newspaper will begin to decompose, creating extra organic matter that is beneficial to the soil.

In areas where you plan to use mulches or you are going to plant on a steep slope, leave the killed grass in place. The dead grass and its roots and runners help reduce soil erosion until the new planting is established. To improve appearance and reduce future weed growth, cover the dead grass with about 4 inches of mulch, such as wood chips or bark chunks. Spot treat with glyphosate any grass and weeds that sprout through the mulch. As the dead grass decays, it contributes organic matter to the soil.

Where you want flower beds, it is best to till under the dead grass. Any Roundup residue that comes into contact with soil will be deactivated and will not harm new plantings, except where direct seeding is done.

If you seed flowers, alternative grasses and vegetables, remove the dead grass and roots. Residue in the dead plant material can interfere with seed germination. An alternative is to thoroughly rototill the dead grass into the soil and wait until the grass has fully decomposed. If kept moist, but not wet, this may take one month to six weeks in warm weather.

Note that xeric plants are similar to high water plants during establishment. They require regular and relatively high amounts of water after transplanting or seeding. Only after xeric plants are well established can they be gradually weaned and watered more sparingly. Consider water availability when deciding the timing of a change from a moderate or high water using landscape to a xeriscape.

Install a drip system

Drip or micro-irrigation systems can be a good way to water any type of plant except turf. Low pressure, micro-irrigation systems apply water slowly and close to the ground. This eliminates waste from water blowing off-target and reduces water use. The boundary between sprinklers and drip irrigation has blurred with advancements in micro-irrigation to include spray stakes. Most micro-irrigation systems are easy to install and modify. Drip irrigation kits are available at most garden centers. They allow you to water plants separately with emitters, or water groups of plants with micro-spray stakes or tapes that ooze water along their entire length. You can enlarge the system as plants grow or as new plants are added.

Use drip systems to maintain constant moisture in the plant root zone. Do not use them to "water in" new plantings. New plantings need rapid, deep watering that is best done by hand. Once the soil has settled around new plants, the drip system can maintain moisture.

Practices to avoid

Do not group plants with different water needs together in the same irrigation zone. You will not be able to meet the water needs of any of the plants resulting in poor plant growth or death. A common mistake is to group a high water use plant such as a spruce together with a low water use pine. "Hydrozone" plants by grouping plants with similar water needs together so they can be effectively watered for best plant health.

When removing areas from turf, do not cover them with solid sheet plastic and gravel, rock or volcanic cinder. Plastics shed water and create wasteful runoff. They exclude water and essential air exchange to plant roots, increase evaporation from surrounding areas by raising local soil and air temperatures, and can cause root injury due to heat buildup.

Keep rock or gravel areas to a minimum. They tend to increase air and soil temperature. Use weed barrier fabrics (geotextiles) available in garden centers. These materials allow water penetration and air exchange. Cover landscape fabrics with mulch.

Instead of rock and gravel, consider organic materials such as wood chips and chunk bark. They give a natural look and help retain moisture, as well as hold weeds in check. Use mulch either with or without a landscape fabric to save water. Rock may be required to cover a steep slope where wood chips and gravel may wash away. In these cases, use natural river bed cobble of varying sizes. Lay rock over a weed barrier fabric in much the same way as if you were constructing a rock wall.

Another option for steep slopes is to install a natural rock garden with water-conserving alpine plants. Terracing steep slopes is another option to consider. For more information on plants call the Extension Office at 264-5931 or come by the fairgrounds for a visit.

Check out our Web page at www.archuleta.colostate.edu for calendar events and information.

Pagosa Lakes News

A fine day for an Easter egg hunt

Hosting an egg hunt during spring in the Rockies is an iffy affair.

One could be hiding the eggs in snow banks or in a couple inches of mud. Children could flaunt their pretty new outfits or be bundled up in arctic gear.

This past Saturday turned out to be as special as the recreation center staff had hoped for. It was a beautiful sunny day with highs in the mid-60s. Blue skies, crisp air, isolated splashes of color from blooming bulbs and not a patch of snow in sight.

Two days before the egg hunt, staff were wringing their fingers as it sleeted and rained; with winds strong enough to keep most folks indoors. That's spring in the mountains.

Five hundred eggs, over a hundred kids, two hours of egg-hiding and site decoration _ and it was all over after 10 minutes of furious commotion. The kids loved it and not a single child left empty-handed.

Calamity, the clown and her puppet friends, the sheriff's deputies, Walt Lukasik (PLPOA general manager), Todd, Harry, Daniel and Derek _ all played a role in entertaining the kids. Even grown men will wear furry rabbit ears to see a child smile. The fire truck and the deputies' patrol cars were a source of fascination for the children, as was Calamity's magic. Thank you all for making the egg hunt a special time for our children.

Center closed

The recreation center will be closed Sunday for Easter. Have a lovely day with your family and may the joy of renewed life be yours this Easter.

Public meeting

Another reminder that next Monday evening, at 6 p.m., the Archuleta County Sheriff's Department is holding an open discussion on issues affecting the Pagosa Vista subdivision neighborhood. The Pagosa Lakes Property Owners Association receives numerous calls from residents of Vista subdivision regarding trash, loose dogs, speeding cars, etc. This is an opportunity to be involved in the process to address some of these problematic issues.

The discussion will be held at Pagosa Lakes Clubhouse, 230 Port Ave. Cake and refreshments will be provided.

PLPOA meeting

There will be a Pagosa Lakes Property Owners Association board meeting at 7 p.m. today in the Pagosa Lakes Clubhouse. The following agenda was approved by PLPOA:

_ Call to order;

_ Approval of agenda;

_ Approval of minutes of March 9, 2006, board meeting minutes;

_ General manager's report;

_ Public comments;

_ Treasurer's report;

_ Committee reports;

_ Old business;

_ New business;

_ Correspondence;

_ Adjournment.

Obituaries

Joe Andy Loomis

Joe Andy Loomis passed away on April 11, 2006. He was a lifelong resident of Pagosa Springs.

He loved the forest and had lots of friends. Our dearest loving Andy left hand-in-hand with the Lord's angels. He will be greatly missed.

Viewing will be 9 a.m. Friday, April 14, at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church. Rosary will be at 10 a.m. and a service will be held at the church at 10:30 a.m.

Correction

An obituary for Margaret Daugaard submitted last week had two names misspelled. The following are the corrected spellings: Cindy E. Nossaman Spear and Samantha H. Bebek

 

 

 Business News

Chamber News

Job, career fair for local youth, businesses

We have just celebrated the Week of the Young Child, we're getting ready to enjoy the education center's gala luncheon and, now, we also have the Job Fair.

As the focal point for businesses in Pagosa, why would the Chamber get involved with the youth of Archuleta County?

The obvious reason is that our young adults are our future: our future business owners and employees, and customers.

Our young people will be the focus in April, starting with the Governor's Summer Job & Career Fair to be held Saturday, April 22.

This is the perfect opportunity for businesses and young people to come together and close the summer job-hunt gap. Businesses are encouraged to host a table at the community center and contact potential employees. There is no cost to host a table and the benefit is you could gain a very worthy employee.

Here is an added benefit: Since many business owners cannot afford to leave their establishments to attend the job fair, the Chamber of Commerce will act as a conduit to steer interested youth to employment opportunities.

Here's what you have to do: List the employment opportunities you will offer this summer. You can also send us employment applications. Provide us with appropriate descriptions of available jobs and we will try to match youngsters to your needs. It's that easy.

This is the perfect opportunity to hire your summer staff. Not only that, but there are career opportunities for the youngsters as well. Construction companies: If you are looking for short- or long-range help, or are willing to train, contact me. We can help direct young adults into the construction field as framers, drywallers, concrete workers, finish workers or the like.

Here at the Chamber, we are constantly asked by business owners to help them find competent personnel. We have inquiries from the banking industry, retail outlets, and lodging and restaurant industries. We want to help you find summer help _ and long-term help as well.

As for the youth, there are many job and career opportunities out there. Not everyone gets to start at the top of the ladder. How many general contractors, restaurant owners, hotel managers and the like started out bartending, pounding nails, or cleaning rooms? As you read your "star" magazines, how many stars started out waitressing or bartending? You can develop a work ethic and life skills while advancing your way up the ladder.

Contact Martha Garcia at the Colorado Workforce Center at 731-3832 to host a table or the Chamber of Commerce at 264-2360 to add your name to the list of potential employers in need of assistance if you are not able to attend. This event is sponsored by the Colorado Workforce Center, the Kiwanis Club, the community center, San Juan BOCES and the Archuleta Economic Development Association. The Chamber thanks those organizations for putting this event together.

Ed center luncheon

We continue with youth involvement at the education center's gala luncheon with keynote speaker, Dave DeForest-Stalls, president and CEO of Big Brothers and Sisters of Colorado.

This yearly, highly-anticipated event occurs at 11:45 a.m. Wednesday, April 26, at the First Baptist Church . The primary, fund-raising event for the center focuses on "Making a Difference," something Stalls has done, as has our education center. Tickets are available for a donation of $45 and can be obtained by calling 264-2835. Don't miss this annual event as Stalls will discuss some innovative activities he instituted, such as recording studios, graphic, Web publishing and much more.

Our youth are our future. Let's put the pieces of the puzzle together for our community and unite employers and those looking for jobs to create a productive, successful, profitable summer for all involved.

That's my diatribe this week. We need you kids to help our businesses; we want to teach you a viable trade and what it takes to run a business. Hopefully, all will come together starting with the Job Fair April 22.

Welcome members

We would like to lead off this week's renewals with quite a few lodging facilities, starting off with The Springs Resort.

We also welcome Canyon Crest Lodge located in the quiet confines of Martinez Canyon.

Joining us again with two properties is Pamela Smith with Acorn Cottage and Alpine Haven.

Also on the lodging renewal list this week is A Cozy Log Loft.

Moving over to the dining side of life, we welcome back Tequila's Mexican Restaurant.

We welcome back Larry Fisher and Ski and Bow Rack.

We love our animals and here are two businesses to help you take care of them. Our first renewal here is Dr. Joe Schmidt and Aspen Tree Veterinary Clinic.

Then we have the very creative business of Chris Crump and Animan mobile pet bathing and grooming.

Welcome back to Rocky Mountain Home and Leisure.

We also welcome back Scott Tonges and Southwest Property Trust.

Renewing this week is Rito Blanco Nursery and Organic Farm.

Out of the area now, we welcome back Rainbow Printing in Durango.

As for our non-profit organizations this week, we welcome back the San Juan Mountains Association and the Loma Linda Homeowners Association.

Last and not least is the renewal of associate members John and Char Neill. Char is always great at attending our training classes throughout the year. Thanks for being an avid learner!

Once again, April 22 will be a big day for the businesses here in our community. Contact Martha Garcia if you would like a table at the Job Fair, or contact me so we at the Chamber can determine how to best help you with your employment needs.

Parents: Get your young adults to the fair.

Biz BeatPeopleCards of Thanks

Casa de los Arcos

Thank you from Casa de los Arcos to the following people and organizations for their generous donations.

Thanks go to Gene Crabtree for the delectable food basket; to Loaves and Fishes, as always, for the delicious lunches and the leftovers; to Coyote Hill Lodge for donating the delicious lunch prepared by Flying Burrito Restaurant; and for the beautiful gifts from Made in Colorado shop.

Special thanks also to Gina and Nyla for setting up and serving the lunch and passing the gifts out; Heritage Custom Homes for their generous cash donation; anonymous donor for the clothing; and Curves organization for their food donation.

Sincere thanks from Casa manager Molly Johnson and all the Casa residents.

Molly Johnson

Story night

Many thanks to Felicia Meyer for chairing the wonderful Storyteller Night on April 6 at the elementary school. Over 240 people attended.

Thank you to Mrs. Buckley, Mr. Anderson, Mrs. Shipman, Mrs. Hicklin, Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Redmon, Mrs. Lucero, and Mrs. Boudreaux for letting us use their classrooms.

Thank you to Mr. Lindner, Mrs. Lucero, Jeff Laydon, Mark Brown, Jann Pitcher, Charlie King, Heather Hunts and Paulie Cole for sharing their fabulous stories. Thanks also to Mr. Alley, Ms. Holts, Barb Draper, Kristen Hopkins, Lisa Scott, Ron Doctor, Jennifer Read Lindberg, Dylan Read Lindbergh, Leticia Gallegos, Jim Sellars, Shanna Cop, Pete Gonzales, Lynne Gullette, and everyone who contributed to creating this memorable evening!

Stephanie Jones

Essay contest

Thank you to the 28 students participating in the Humane Society Essay Contest. Entries were received from Amanda Barnes, Kayla Catlin, Natalie Erickson, Andrea Fautheree, Gabriela Gonzalez, Emmi Greer, Kenny Hargreaves, Shea Johnson, Colt Larkin, Corey Lucero, Kelsi Lucero, Zach Lucero, NaCole Martinez, Kaitlin Mastin, Taylor McKee, Jacob Ormonde, Danielle Pajak, Rocio Palma, Roxana Palma, Rose Quintana, Rachel Snow, Paige Swinehart, Zach Thomas, Jordan Wagner, Maegan Walters, Thomas Watkins, Beau Weiher and Lynzee Yager.

Thank you also to the teachers and parents who encouraged these students to participate.

The Humane Society of Pagosa Springs

Sports Page

Pirate track team competes in back-to-back meets, readies for Bayfield

Two meets in two days.

Tough going for the Pirate track team.

But, effort that could pay big dividends at season's end, when endurance and the ability to maintain concentration over extended periods of time are required for success.

Friday, the Pirates traveled to Ignacio for a small meet involving some IML foes and competitors from a number of smaller programs. While no team results were available, Coach Connie O'Donnell reported her team produced some impressive results.

Pirate girls won six events at the meet. The 4x800-meter relay team of Jessica Lynch, Elise McDonald, Jenni Webb-Shearston and Chelsea Cooper won the event with a time of 10 minutes, 48.7 seconds.

The 4x100 relay of Nikki Kinkead, Lindsey Mackey, Stephanie Lowe and Kim Fulmer posted a 55:11 time for first place.

Jaclyn Harms won the 3,200-meter run. The cross country veteran hit the finish line at 13:04.98.

Kristin DuCharme was the winner in the shot put and the discus.

On the boys' side, Travis Furman, another veteran of cross country action, took first in the 800 with a time of 2:11.98.

The win in the "Throwers Relay" — a novelty relay composed of shot put and discus competitors — went to the Pagosa team of Craig Schutz, Myron Voorhis, David Dunmyre and Zane Gholson.

Second place in the long jump went to Chase Moore, with a leap of 17 feet, 11.5 inches.

A.J. Abeyta took second in the 3,200 at 11:22.9.

Dunmyre finished in second place in the shot.

The 4x800 relay of Jackson Walsh, Gholson, Tesh Parker and Ryan Abresch took second place.

"This was a small meet," said O'Donnell, "maybe just what we needed. We were missing some athletes because of the school musical, ACT tests and illness."

O'Donnell was impressed by several accomplishments at Ignacio.

"Jessica Lynch is a competitor," she said. "She received the baton in the thirty-two hundred relay about 75 meters from the leader and ended up nipping her at the tape. She almost got another girl at the tape in the eight-hundred relay.

"Nikki Kinkead is running very close to the school record in the hundred. The record is twelve ninety-nine. I won't let the athletes have a school record unless they are electronically timed. I really hope she gets the record this week in Bayfield — our first meet with electronic timing.

"Our female throwers are placing, and that's something that hasn't happened too often in the past, and Jaclyn Harms told me the thirty-two hundred was fun. I'm glad that she's enjoying the competition."

Saturday, the team boarded the bus and motored to Farmington, for a considerably bigger event. When the dust settled, the Pirate girls finished seventh in a field of 13 teams; the boys' team was fifth in a field of 13.

Craig Schutz took first in discus, with a throw of 138 feet, producing the sole first-place finish at the meet. The boys' 4x200 relay of Jordan Shaffer, Corbin Mellette, Gunnar Gill and Mike Smith was third, at 1:23.39.

Among the girls, two athletes produced second-place performances: Kinkead (12.67 in the 100) and Harms (13:18.89 in the 3,200).

Fulmer's 1:03.05 in the 400 bested her Ignacio time and brought her third place at Farmington.

"It was a really nice day," said O'Donnell of the Farmington meet. "It was perfect weather for track. Our boys did much better with their relay handoffs at Farmington (boy's relay teams missed handoffs and were disqualified Friday at Ignacio).

"Craig's throw in the discus was close to his personal best and it was a great effort, considering it is still early in the season."

O'Donnell saw some quality work on the track by members of her boys' team. "I'm so impressed by the freshman Jackson Walsh. He is a great runner and I believe he'll be a standout as he matures. He has a great attitude and there is a look of determination in his eyes when he is competing.

"A.J. Abeyta performed well once again. He improved his thirty-two hundred time and ran another back-to-back race with the sixteen-hundred relay. Brian Patane ran his personal best in the one-ten hurdles and he is really looking to improve it even further."

The coach singled out Kinkead again for her efforts. "Nikki ran another excellent hundred.

"Because they run prelims in the four-hundred in New Mexico, Kim Fulmer ran three four-hundreds because of the sixteen-hundred relay, and Jessica Lynch ran four of them. Throughout the day, neither of these girls let their times decrease by more than two seconds. That is a lot of fast and competitive running. When you add to that the fact they both ran a couple four-hundreds the night before in Ignacio, you realize what competitive runners they are. They have both been great leaders and never complained to me once about all those races."

Saturday, the team is at the Pine River Invitational in Bayfield.

"This is usually a big meet," said the coach, "and I'm looking forward to our athletes getting out there and competing with all the heart they have shown me these last two weeks."

The Pine River Invitational begins at 9 a.m.

Dolores spoils Pirates' home opener

The Pagosa Springs Pirates finally got a feel for playing at Golden Peaks Stadium.

The weather cooperated somewhat, the field was in fair condition and a good crowd showed up for the first home baseball game in more than two years. Some of the varsity Pirates had never played on the home diamond, so it was a grand afternoon for baseball.

Their opponent was the 2A Dolores Bears. They were a scrappy bunch and were looking to spoil the Pirates' home debut.

The crowd would not be disappointed. Maybe it was the karma. Neither team seemed to want to leave the stadium as the game would go to extra innings before it was decided.

The Pirates came out strong in the early innings, just as they had in previous games, to build an early lead. This time, on the home turf, the score went to 6-2 for the black and gold. The Pirates jumped on the Bears for four runs in the bottom of the fourth and had loaded the bases again. But, with two outs, they couldn't muster a hit and left three stranded. If Pagosa scored one or two more they probably would have put the Bears back in their dens for more winter.

But they didn't — and the momentum later turned.

The Bears (3-4, 0-1 in league play) pounced on the Pirates (5-5, 0-2 in IML) for eight runs in the top of the seventh inning to go up 10-6. Pagosa would tie it in their half on a good comeback to send the game to extra innings, but Dolores would outscore the Pirates to get the win in eight, 13-11.

Coach Charlie Gallegos was disappointed after the loss. "We just can't seem to stop (the opponent). Usually eleven runs will win the game, but it looks like we'll have to score 20." The Pirates had 11 hits and nine RBIs but allowed 13 hits in a game they should have won.

The coach added, "One of our best pitchers is still hurt so we'll just have to keep working and try to come up with a way to win."

Wes Walters started on the mound for the Pirates with John Hoffman behind the plate.

Dolores opened the scoring in the top of the first on a solo home run to deep left field by catcher Gideon Condon.

Shortstop Josh Hoffman singled in the Pirates' half of the first and stole second base. Casey Hart, playing at second base, doubled to left center to score Hoffman. Hart eventually scored on a passed ball to put Pagosa up 2-1.

Both teams went down in order in the second inning on good defensive play.

The Bears sent six to the plate in the top of the third. Their No. 8 hitter, left fielder Deven Valdez, led off with a single to right field. Shortstop Brett Brunner popped another single to right that scored Valdez and the game was knotted at two each.

Designated hitter Cody Bahn walked for the Pirates to open the bottom half of the third and then stole second base. John Hoffman singled to center that advanced Bahn to third. The Bears defense stepped up with a double play to end the inning with one left on base.

Dolores had two runners on base in the top of the fourth but could not score. The Pirates had two fine defensive plays by Josh Hoffman and third baseman Averey Johnson to get Pagosa out of the jam.

The Buccaneers took control in their half of the inning. Left fielder Karl Hujus opened with a single to right. Travis Richey, playing center field, doubled to left and put runners on second and third. First baseman Jim Guyton reached first on an infield error and Hujus scored. Cole Kraetsch, pinch hitting for right fielder Dan Cammack, hit into a fielder's choice and reached first base. Walters, trying to help his own cause, sent a single to right field that scored Kraetsch. Bahn singled to left for two more RBIs and a 6-2 Pirates' lead. John Hoffman singled to center and Josh Hoffman walked to load the bases but all were left stranded on the third out.

Walters walked two Bears in the top of the fifth but Josh Hoffman and Hart stepped up on defense to get them out of the inning. The Pirates went down in order.

There was no scoring in the sixth and it started to look like the four-run lead might hold up for the Pirates.

But Dolores would not go away. They sent 12 batters to the plate in the top of the seventh to take the 10-6 lead. Condon opened with another long home run to left field that turned the game. Seven more Bears reached base and the score was 9-6 for the visitors. Coach Gallegos put Josh Hoffman in at pitcher and one more run scored to end the pain.

The Pirates came back: John and Josh Hoffman both reached base on an error and a hit batter. Hart blasted a three-run homer over the left field fence that put the score at 10-9. Hujus and Richey both reached base on errors. Guyton laid down a sacrifice bunt that advanced the runners to second and third. Cammack sacrificed a run in that sent the game to extra innings.

The Bears would outscore the Pirates 3-1 in the eighth inning for the win.

Pagosa will travel to La Jara and face the Centauri Falcons in a doubleheader Saturday. "Centauri is a pretty good team so our kids will have to be prepared. These are must wins for us now," said Gallegos.

Bobcats sweep Pirates in doubleheader

The weather didn't cooperate with the Pagosa Springs Pirates.

The first scheduled baseball home opener in more than two years for the Pirates didn't pan out when snow, wind and rain covered Golden Peaks Stadium. The doubleheader with the Ignacio Bobcats had to be moved to the Ignacio field.

Weather there wasn't any better, but the field was in pretty good shape.

So were the Bobcats.

Ignacio outhit, outran, outhustled and simply outplayed the Pirates in the Intermountain League (IML) openers for both schools. The Bobcats could do nothing wrong and Pagosa could do nothing right.

The weather didn't let up and neither did the Bobcats. Ignacio (4-0, 2-0 in IML) swept the Pirates (5-4, 0-2 in IML) in the only regular season meeting between the two teams by lopsided scores of 12-2 and 20-5.

The two wins put the Bobcats in a commanding lead in the IML and left the Pirates scrambling for answers and head coach Charlie Gallegos speechless. "I never thought we would come out this flat and not ready to play," he said. "We'll have to regroup and go back to the drawing board. Give credit to Ignacio. They outplayed us in every phase today."

It looked like the Pirates, playing as the home team, would come out like they had in their first five wins of the season. They stopped Ignacio in the top of the first and put up two quick runs in their half to go up 2-0. But then the bottom fell out and Pagosa would not score again. They let the Bobcats hang around and by the top of the fourth Ignacio went in front 6-2. In the top of the sixth, Ignacio lit the board for four more, and the first game was history.

Give credit to pitcher Derek Rodriquez who was on the mound for the Bobcats. He pitched the entire game for the win and didn't allow a run after the first inning.

The second game was over early. The Bobcats pounced on the Pirates' pitchers for four runs in the top of the first, four more in their half of the second and 10 in the fourth to put it out of reach at 18-3. The game was stopped after the mandatory five innings of play and a 10-run rule.

Gallegos added, "We will really need to take a hard look at ourselves and find some answers quickly. I really thought we were on the right track after the big win at Cortez."

Ignacio 12, Pirates 2

The Pirates looked in control to start the first game. Wes Walters was pitching for Pagosa and allowed one walk and a single in the top of the first. Pagosa opened quickly in their half on a single by leadoff hitter John Hoffman. Josh Hoffman followed with a walk. Matt Gallegos popped a single to left center that scored John Hoffman. Karl Hujus singled to right to score Gallegos and put the Pirates up 2-0.

Both teams went scoreless in the second.

In the top of the third, Scott Hill tripled for Ignacio and reached home on a single by Brandon Cundiff. The Pirates had a nice 5-4-3 double play from Averey Johnson to Casey Hart to Jim Guyton to end the inning with the score 2-1.

The Pirates loaded the bases in their half of the third on base hits by Gallegos and Hart. Travis Richey was hit by pitch, but all were left on base to end the inning.

Nine Bobcats went to bat in the top of the fourth and scored six on four hits and five RBIs.

In the bottom of the fourth John Hoffman was hit by a Rodriquez pitch but was left stranded on three quick outs.

Neither team could muster a run in the fifth.

The Bobcats kept the pressure on and scored four more in their half of the sixth and two in the seventh to end the game.

Ignacio 20, Pirates 5

The Bobcats would not let up in the second contest. They pounded the Pirates for four runs in the opening inning on big leadoff hits by Rodriquez, Hill and Cundiff. Pagosa seemed to have no answer for the top of the Ignacio batting order. Gallegos started on the mound for the Pirates but was replaced by Josh Hoffman.

Hill, pitching for the Bobcats, sent the black and gold down in order. The Pirates put the ball in play but all flied out to Rodriquez playing very well in center field.

Ignacio scored four more in the top of the second on triples by Rodriquez and Hill. Nine batters went to the plate for four hits and three RBIs and an 8-0 lead.

Pagosa finally found some life in the bottom of the second. Nine Pirates went to the plate to score three on three hits but still left the bases loaded to end the inning. Hart started with a single and Hujus walked. Guyton grounded out but two scored. Cody Bahn reached first on an error and stole two bases. Dan Cammack singled for an RBI and the Pirates were back in it 8-3.

The newfound momentum was short lived when Ignacio's top of the order came to bat again. Rodriquez singled, Hill tripled and Cundiff singled again to start another scoring spree. Hujus replaced Hoffman at pitcher for the Pirates. Pagosa made another fine 6-4-3 double play but errors gave Ignacio new life and Hujus faced 12 more batters before the inning was over and an 18-3 lead.

Hart doubled to left center to open the bottom half of the third. Hujus singled but the Pirates went out on a double play by the Bobcats.

Hill, helping his own cause, banged another triple in the fourth to score two more for the Bobcats and a 20-3 lead.

Pagosa would score two more in the bottom of the fourth on a single by Richey.

The Pirates did load the bases in their half of the fifth on a ground rule double by Hujus and two walks but Hill pitched Ignacio through it for the win.

The Pirates will have to regroup and find some answers quickly. They travel to La Jara Saturday for another IML doubleheader with the Centauri Falcons. The start times are set at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. This is probably a must win situation for the black and gold if they want a chance to get back in the IML regular season race.

In other IML action last weekend:

Ignacio (5-0, 3-0 in IML) defeated Centauri (2-1, 0-1 in IML) 17-2.

Ignacio (6-0, 4-0 in IML) defeated Centauri (2-2, 0-2 in IML) 10-0.

Monte Vista (6-5, 1-0 in IML) defeated Bayfield (4-3, 0-1 in IML) 13-5.

Bayfield (5-3, 1-1 in IML) defeated Monte Vista (6-6, 1-1 in IML) 16-3.

Pirate soccer team steamrolls Center

Variable weather.

Invariable team, with a weak opponent.

A recipe for a blowout.

A 9-0 blowout, to be precise, as the Pirate soccer team defeated Center Friday for the second time this season to remain unbeaten in league play.

Soccer weather?

Considering the game is played in nearly all conditions — yes, it was.

"It was a blustery, sunny, cloudy, windy day in Center," said Coach Lindsey Kurt-Mason. The coach was happy to report the Pirate keeper Iris Frye emerged from the contest without suffering hypothermia, given she had little reason to move the entire game.

"They (Center) never got into our end of the field in the first half," said Kurt-Mason. The Pirates thoroughly dominated the action and took a 5-0 lead into halftime.

The Pirates added four more goals in the second half and, while the Vikings had one shot on goal during the half, the team from the San Luis Valley posed no threat whatsoever to a staunch Pirate defense.

Once again, the scoring was led by midfielder Laurel Reinhardt. She scored three goals and had three assists against the Vikings.

Senior Jennifer Hilsabeck continued to light the scoreboard. She scored twice and had one assist.

Junior Mariah Howell was moved to the wing from her striker position and she responded with two goals and an assist.

Kailey Smith continued as a force from midfield, tallying a goal and one assist.

Lexi Johnson scored a goal off a corner kick to round out the Pirates' total of nine.

"We kept it in their half of the field all day," said the coach. "We incorporated our defense well. I wanted our defensive four to play with the midfield.

"We tried to work on keeping our spacing and shape, to play team defense and team offense."

The strategy began to work out in the second half. "We got a bit tight with it in the first half," said Kurt-Mason, "and we didn't spread out as much as I'd like. In the second half, I told them to loosen up the square, and they did it. We kept the spacing and defended and attacked as a team.

The Pirates return home to play four games in the space of six days, three of the matches back-to-back.

Action begins today at Golden Peaks Stadium when Pagosa takes the pitch to battle Cortez. The varsity match begins at 3 p.m.

Tomorrow, April 14, Ridgway comes to town for a league matchup at 6 p.m.

Saturday the Pirates face Ignacio for the second time this season. The Pirates entertain the Bobcats at 11 a.m. in a game postponed one week due to a scheduling conflict.

Tuesday, April 18, the Durango Demons come to town for a rematch of one of the season's best contests to date. The Pirates and Demons square off at 4 p.m.

 

Pagosa Springs Recreation

'Street art' graffiti not welcome, yet

The skaters grinding the curb along the Riverwalk under the Hot Springs Boulevard Bridge eyed me suspiciously.

"I'm so glad you're not the ones who did this," I said.

I wasn't in the mood to angrily imitate a policeman. Thankfully I was the only person carrying a can of spray paint.

The amateurish graffiti I'd come to cover up was only a couple days old. I'd noticed it while walking the dogs on my day off, and got to painting over it early the first day back at work. These two young men seemed as relieved as I was that no confrontation was imminent.

The scrawled message was an odd blend of advocacy for a favorite sport and political exhortation. Unlike many lame juvenile taggings, this one contained no profanity, no drug illusions, no sexual innuendo. It was pretty tame, but no less unacceptable for its inoffensiveness.

It was stylistically artless. Some taggers have a calligraphic flair worthy of aesthetic scrutiny. Some of it reflects talent and practice. Some is worthy of praise and admiration.

None of it is allowed at present in Pagosa.

All graffiti I notice on my rounds will be covered or removed at the earliest possible moment. Writers will be denied the gratification of exhibiting their work to their peers. There may come a time and place where this "street art" is allowed, but not until the rules and parameters have been clearly defined. Meanwhile, it will not be tolerated.

I'm pretty sure I know who it was whose work prominently decorated numerous surfaces when I started with the town eight and a half years ago. I admired his flair and skill, and wanted him promptly arrested. If I'm right about his identity, he did indeed do some time in jail, but not for defacing public property. Apparently there's a lifestyle among some taggers which includes other illegal pursuits for which the penalties are more severe.

What a waste.

It's my contention that we're blessed at the moment with very high quality minor criminals in Pag-town. My experience helping to administer useful public service sentences handed down by the local courts bears this out. Most of these petty offenders respond with enthusiastic gratitude to being offered a chance to make a positive contribution to their community. Obviously the axe murderers are in the Big House, and not helping paint picnic tables or raking leaves.

I optimistically await the golden moment when the tagger contingent begins to openly and constructively participate in the life of the town; when there's an acceptance of this oddball culture that doesn't yet quite fit. It could happen. In ways it already is happening.

Tell them I'll continue to obliterate whatever unbidden contribution to the local art scene I encounter, and hope for a blending of attitudes and generations to enrich us all.

Youth baseball

Youth baseball registration begins Monday, April 17, and will continue through May 1.

Cost is $25 per player and $15 for each additional child in the same, immediate family who participates. The season is tentatively scheduled to begin in mid-May.

The recreation office will accept registrations for coach-pitch Pinto division (ages 6, 7 and 8), Mustang division (9-10) and Bronco division (11-12).

The office will also accept registrations for Pony division (13-4), but if the number of registrations turned in is not sufficient to support a league in this age bracket (at least two teams), registration fees will be refunded and the league will be cancelled.

Registration forms will be supplied to local schools and will also be available at the recreation office, which is now located upstairs in Town Hall.

Coaches and team sponsors are needed and appreciated. Cost for sponsorship is $150, which includes sponsor's name on team uniforms, commemorative plaque with team picture and designation in media articles.

For more information call 264-4151, Ext. 232.

Tee-ball picture days

Tee-ball team and individual pictures will be taken April 17 and 19. Teams should report at least 15 minutes prior to their scheduled start times on these dates to facilitate the process. Order forms will be available from Pagosa Photography on site.

The tee-ball schedule for the coming week includes:

April 15 at the community center — Orioles vs. Rockies at 9 a.m. and A's vs. White Sox at 10.

April 17 at the community center — Royals vs. White Sox at 5:30 p.m. and Orioles vs. A's at 6:30.

April 19 at the community center — Rockies vs. Angels at 5:30 p.m.

Parents and coaches should be aware that all games scheduled to be played in the community center may be moved to Town Park, weather permitting, and will begin at the same start times. Coaches will be notified in advance when there is a change in venue and the sports hotline (264-6658) will be updated accordingly.

Adult basketball

The competitive league schedule (all games at the junior high school) for the coming week includes:

April 17 - Ruff Ryders vs. Bear Creek at 7 p.m. in the upper gym, M. Kelley vs. Concrete Connection at 7 in the lower gym, Buckskin vs. Chama I at 8 in the upper gym and Chama II vs. High Mountain Performance at 8 in the lower gym.

April 19 - Bear Creek vs. Slack Attack at 7 p.m. in the upper gym, High Mountain Performance vs. Buckskin at 7 in the lower gym, Concrete Connection vs. Chama II at 8 in the upper gym and Chama I vs. Ruff Ryders at 8 in the lower gym.

The recreation league schedule (all games at the junior high school) for the coming week includes:

Tonight - No games scheduled due to the annual Ross Tournament.

April 18 - Allen's Auto Body vs. Green Machine at 6 p.m. in the upper gym, Ponderosa vs. Citizens Bank at 6 in the lower gym and Shot Callers vs. Tim Miller Custom Homes at 7:05 in the lower gym.

Sports hotline

General information concerning the Pagosa Springs Recreation Department can be obtained by calling the Pagosa Springs Sports Hotline at 264-6658 or logging on to townofpagosasprings.com and going to the parks and recreation link. All schedules and upcoming events are updated on a weekly basis. If you have questions or concerns, or additional information about any of the Pagosa Springs Recreation Department adult need or youth sports programs, call 264-4151, Ext. 232.

Editorial

Do we want it?

The basic question, come May 2 and the chance to vote in the Upper San Juan Health Services District election is, to paraphrase district director Bob Goodman, "Whether you want a hospital, or not." And, of course, whether you want the district to secure the bonds needed to construct a facility.

We want this hospital. We believe it is a good move in a community that is not only growing rapidly, with a significant population of aging residents, but that already exhibits a full range of healthcare needs.

Using the currently dormant Dr. Mary Fisher Clinic as a start, a small hospital can be constructed and operated here that will bring a variety of functions under one roof to serve those needs.

The facility would incorporate a limited number of hospital beds; dramatic, urgent care would still be handled at the regional, and state-of-the-art Mercy Medical Center, and the beds here could provide close-to-home care for many local residents not needing lengthy stays.

A facility could provide a home for local physicians (in addition to their private offices) that allows them to extend their capabilities. There would be round-the-clock emergency physician coverage. Emergency Medical Services would have a better facility from which to do its invaluable business. In addition, the hospital could provide enhanced lab and diagnostic services as well as be a center for more specialist practices.

That we need such a facility was confirmed in a feasibility study undertaken by the district.

Will we end up paying additional taxes to build and operate this critical access hospital? A second feasibility study reported we can pay for construction and operation without raising taxes. It told us funding from a variety of sources could ensure operation with no additional tax burden. In an attempt to inform potential lenders, the study reported the facility could generate revenues that might exceed its base operating cost.

Directors and supporters propose the district use its current mill levy to secure bonds at the lowest possible cost over a 25-year period. Doing so brings banks into the picture — banks, propelled by the profit motive, that would add another layer of oversight to the financial process. Bond funds would be used to construct the critical access hospital.

Revenue from operations, from a portion of the mill levy, from grants and the federal Rural Healthcare Act would provide the funds needed to operate. This federal government program is the key to the entire proposal. And a growing partnership with Mercy Medical Center further strengthens the chance the project will succeed.

Could the project fail?

It is foolish to say there is no chance of failure.

But we would be twice the fool if we passed up a chance to create this facility at a time when it could provide the foundation for increasingly good care in our community for decades to come. This is a matter of thinking both about current needs, and how best to meet needs as they change in the future. This hospital is a reasonable start. There is risk either way you cut it. We prefer the risk of moving ahead and making the improvement.

Local physicians agree. Many local business leaders agree. Many residents fully support the idea.

Our health services district has made its way out of the intensive care unit during the past two years or so. The district was in terrible condition, but is now out of rehab and back on its feet. The next move is to build a Critical Access Hospital.

We urge a "yes" vote on May 2 — "yes" for a hospital and for a healthier future for Pagosa Country.

Karl Isberg°

Legacies

Legacies

90 years ago

Taken from SUN files of April 14, 1916

The many new cases of measles are rousing us to a realization of the imperative need of a strict quarantine in this disease, which is always dangerous and in many cases fatal. A little red tape should never cause our town authorities to quibble over who has the right or whose business it is to segregate every case of the measles and maintain an absolute quarantine until all danger of spreading the disease is past. Quarantine and then argue afterward.

Cat Creek has receded now to about its normal size. It washed out one bridge so as to render it impassable and threatened all the others.

Bob Parmenter started to Carlin's mill Monday, but on account of deep snow on the mountain was unable to reach the mill.

75 years ago

Taken from SUN files of April 17, 1931

Saturday evening, while returning to their coal mine northeast of Pagosa Springs, Mr. and Mrs. T.L. Cox beheld a sight that has been quite unusual in this county for a number of years — a herd of ten beautiful deer. However, they have been doubly fortunate, for just about a year ago and at the same place they came in sight of eight deer.

The stock of merchandise of the Hatcher Hdw. Col store was last week sold to Geo. A. Alley of Pagosa Springs, who was the highest bidder, by Ralph Gleason, representative of the Rocky Mountain Credit Men's Association, and the latter returned to his home at Denver Tuesday. Mr. Alley plans to close out the entire stock shortly at reduced prices.

50 years ago

Taken from SUN files of April 12, 1956

Teachers of School District 50 this week received a $220-a-year raise when the school board met on Monday night.

The co-operative snow and water reports issued by the state and federal governments for April 1 show that the water supply outlook for the San Juan has deteriorated somewhat since last month but still should be adequate for all demands. Snowfall in March was below average, and while it was away above average up until that time, March is usually a very good month for moisture.

April is the one month of the year that has no holidays unless you want to count that day next week when income taxes are due.

25 years ago

Taken from SUN files of April 16, 1981

In a special meeting Tuesday, Pagosa Springs Board of Trustees decided to accept the $17,250 grant from the Colorado Department of Local Governments to begin construction of a turbidity control system. Town Water Superintendent Modesto Montoya was authorized to buy as much water purification equipment as possible with the grant.

Chimney Rock Coal Company is back. While being nearly buried by the coal glut of 1979, the company was forced to lay off most of its personnel. Things have changed. Now the pit below the pillar is a bustling revitalized asset to the area. The mine employs 34 heavy equipment operators, mechanics and management personnel.

Features

Heroes in Our Midst

From now until Memorial Day, as the spring opens the eyes of the world to the possibilities of new beginnings, the hearts of many men and women turn to the remembrances of loved ones who have given of themselves in innumerable and often unimaginable ways through military service. As the prospect of Memorial Day floods our minds with the thoughts of freedom hard-fought, The Pagosa Springs SUN would like to pay tribute to a few of those among us who've defended those freedoms around the world _ to the Heroes in Our Midst. We will run this series in select issues from now until May 25.

In the 18th century, Thomas Paine wrote the oft quoted line, "These are the times that try men's souls."

Although Paine was writing of the American Revolution, his words could not be more fitting for the World War II era that found the entire world gripped by fear, determination and faithfulness.

Pagosa Springs residents Bruce Muirhead and Bill Carnicom, both First Lieutenants, were among the brave and selfless young men who battled for the liberty of the United States, and the numerous countries under the dark cloud of Hitler's power.

Muirhead and Carnicom were B-17 pilots in the mid-1940s. By coupling faith with raw courage, each young pilot lead a crew of nine men through over 30 air battles each and brought their crews home without injury.

"May 12 [1944]: Mission Number Four Š This one was rough. May I never see one worse. The catch was that unpredicted headwinds made us 30 minutes late so we missed our [protective] fighters all along the route. Almost entirely. We didn't miss Jerry's fighters, however. Near Hamburg, they hit the Wing ahead of us. Flashes of the 20s like a sparkler and B-17s fell from everywhere. Four exploded in the formation and many more went down in flames. I tried to count chutes but there were too many. A plane in our Wing caught fire in Number 4 engine just to our left and we could see their faces as they bailed out. We were under fighter attack for about two hours on both sides of the target. Our gunners fired away so I knew they were close, but which was to be my last minute on earth I couldn't tell. Need I say we were all praying? I do on every mission, and before and afterŠ" states Muirhead's mission diary, which he wrote throughout his combat career. Muirhead was in the 8th Air Force, 45th Combat Wing, 3rd Division, 388th bomb group, 562nd squadron.

Muirhead enlisted on Feb. 27, 1942, by his own will because he felt it was his duty to protect his country. After fulfilling all his training duties, Muirhead married his wife of nearly 60 years, Mary. Just weeks after their nuptials, Muirhead was sent to the European theater.

"We immediately knew we would be parted," recalls Muirhead. Trials began from his first overseas flight, as his crew tried to land their brand new B-17 at Nutts Corner, Ireland, for refueling. The landing gear did not go down because the electric motor would not run. A crew member tried to use the manual crank, but it was coated with ice and would not budge. Finally, the crewman jumped on the crank to dislodge the ice, and the plane made a safe landing.

Muirhead and his crew were issued a different plane after reaching their base in Knettishall, England. Muirhead named this plane "Lotta Bull," for the tenacity displayed by the many bulldogs he kept throughout his childhood.

Bill Carnicom also freely enlisted, in the summer of 1942. He had completed more than two years of his college education, and he grew "tired of waiting." Although he entered the service as an airplane mechanic, he passed the testing that enabled him to become trained as a pilot.

Carnicom was based in Thurleigh, England, about 60 miles northwest of London. He was in the 8th Air Force, 40th Combat Wing, 306th bomb group, the 423rd "Grim Reaper" squadron. On Jan. 2, 1945, Carnicom flew from Savannah, Georgia, to England where an uncharacteristic snowstorm had made landing difficult.

"The snow was plane-high," said Carnicom. "They had nothing but coal shovels to clear the runway." After waiting out the storm, Carnicom continued to his base in Thurleigh. On his first mission, Carnicom was placed in the position of tail gunner in the first plane in the formation.

"It was scary," said Carnicom. "In fact, it was scary every time I went [up]." Carnicom recalls his "worst," most difficult mission over Dresden: "It was a case where we had contrails and a lot of smoke. The bomb groups were disoriented, and timing was bad. Planes were crossing over, up ahead, down below. My copilot had vertigo, so I had to do all the flying. We had to go into a steep turn, and I could hear the bombs bumping on the bomb bay doors." Carnicom's load was four tons of 500-pound bombs.

"The plane stalled and we lost 2,000 feet of altitude," said Carnicom. "We never thought we were going to survive."

Carnicom and his crew endured another frightening encounter with their bomb load on another mission. As they flew at 13,000 feet, coming off their bomb run, they experienced too much drag and discovered that their bomb bay doors were stuck open _ a 500 pound bomb had become hung up and did not drop when Carnicom's plane dropped the rest of its load.

As pilot and the tallest member of the crew, Carnicom volunteered to stretch himself across the opening in the belly of the plane to try to manually open the malfunctioning bomb release.

Carnicom could not force the bomb away by reaching, so he and the plane engineer climbed onto the catwalk mounted between the bomb lodgings. As there was not space enough to wear a parachute, the engineer held onto Carnicom's collar for protection as he jumped on the bomb to force it to fall.

By this time, their plane had fallen behind the formation, and enemy fighters were approaching. Doing his best to save the crew and the plane named "Spare Parts," the copilot pulled up on the controls while Carnicom and the engineer held on to their tedious position on the catwalk.

Finally, the bomb let go and the doors closed. Carnicom and his crew rejoined their formation and safely returned to base.

Muirhead's most challenging mission is recorded in his mission journal beginning with the simple label, "June 21: Mission Number 24, shuttle to Russia." It continues to describe every pilot's nightmare: "Well, this is what we've been waiting for, whispering about, winking over Š Things went smoothly for some time as we headed east Š Suddenly, we saw some fighters streak by. 'ME-109s!' Š Our next excitement came when accurate flak (enemy fire) came up at us Š" After a description of nearly exhausted fuel levels from flying for almost 12 hours and uncertain landing patterns, Muirhead describes a landing with relatively little excitement, dinner served on the ground and a settling in for the night.

"About midnight I was awakened by a lot of noise and flashing lights. I laid there for some time watching it all. Search lights played across the sky. Ack-ack guns spit balls of light four in a row which seemed to float up and up and out of sight. Bombs were dropping, too.

"Yes, bombs were dropping! And we were the target; a juicy target of planes and men.

"It was time to get up and get away from there! I slipped on my coveralls and shoes and ran to a brick wall, ruins of past bombings. From there I could see the field. There were many great fires and I knew each one was a B-17. I decided to get further from the field, so I ran to a pile of dirt and lay behind it. I was there only seconds I think, when I saw a pile of bricks a little further back and ran for them. There was a crowd there, then a resounding crash and the crowd was gone. I decided it was time to settle down instead of running, so I curled up into as little space as possible and shivered. Constant prayer settled me down. Then the parachute flares came down and disrobed us of our only armor, darkness. It was light as day and each of us felt he had been singled out as the target for the next bomb."

Muirhead and his crew survived and completed their 30 required missions.

"We never turned back except for weather and mechanical problems," said Carnicom. "You knew what you were there for and you just kept going. I flew with three to four different crews, and no one was ever hit. The Good Lord was our tail gunner."

Carnicom married after the war and celebrates his 54th anniversary this year. He and his wife bought property in Pagosa Springs in 1975 after exploring the Four Corners area while working in the oil service industry, and built a home here in 2000. They have two grown sons who reside in Nebraska and Florida.

Muirhead moved to Boulder after the war and worked as a finance manager at the University of Colorado. He remained in the reserves and was called into active duty during the Korean War. After his 21-month tour, Muirhead resigned his commission. He retired in Pagosa Springs 25 years ago and is father to George, a resident of Pagosa Springs, and a son and daughter who live in Crested Butte.

Carnicom and Muirhead grew and lived among peers with hearts as dedicated and steadfast as their own. Termed "The Greatest Generation" by Tom Brokaw, these remarkable men and women gave without thought of self throughout their service to their country. These brave men and treasures of Pagosa Springs have earned such a title by their incredible sacrifice and valor.

Pagosa's Past

The continuing saga of Emmet Wirt

Last week, we described an incident in Pagosa Springs involving Emmet Wirt.

As most old-timers in this area know, Wirt achieved fame and fortune as post trader for the Jicarilla Apaches. Wirt's trading post was in Dulce.

In a sentence, one could say Wirt earned his fortune by acting as middle man for Apache sheep and cattle sales. Wirt managed to handle the livestock both going and coming, presumably and justifiable, making a profit in both directions.

Wirt's name appears in countless documents, but his principle biographer is J. Denton Sims, long-time pastor of the Reform Church in Dulce. Sims wrote about Wirt in an autobiography of his own life titled, "Cowboys, Indians, and Pulpits," and in an article included in "Pioneers of the San Juan Country, Vol. III," titled "Emmet Wirt Pioneer Extra Ordinary."

Wirt was born on a Missouri farm Feb. 7, 1868, according to Sims. From the beginning, Wirt's compulsion to "be on his own," brought him to the Chama, New Mexico, area as a teenager, where he soon landed a job working in a mill owned by A. J. Sullenberger.

Wirt's job was as night herder for the logging operation's team of oxen. Turned out to graze at night, the oxen had to be rounded up in the morning and brought to the work site.

Still restless, Wirt soon found work over in the Four Corners Country with the Bar U Cattle Company, a large outfit according to Sims. It is said that his only expenditures for years was for cartridges and an annual spree when he went to town. He drew no wages other than those which covered ammunition for his six shooter and the powder that would occasionally explode in town. And so his earnings accumulated until he had a tidy sum to his credit.

The day came when it was rumored that the financial condition of the cattle company was not too good. In true Emmet Wirt style, he went straight to headquarters and asked for his money. He was told that he could not draw all that was due him, but would have to accept installments instead.

"I want it right now and I am going to get it," Wirt insisted.

"We just can't pay you that much money at one time," the boss replied.

"You will or else," Wirt said. With one hand on his pistol, he took the cattleman to the range where they gathered enough large steers to cover the wages due Wirt.

Wirt then packed his bed roll on a lead horse, and dressed in his customary buckskins, single-handedly drove the herd across Cumbres Pass, the San Luis Valley and into Pueblo, Colorado. He leased a pasture a few miles outside of Pueblo and commenced butchering and selling his beef.

At about this same time, Sims says 1890, the government was trying to settle the Jicarilla Apaches on their new reservation around and south of Dulce. Some of the Apaches still clung to inhabit their old haunts and were roaming all of the way from the Colorado line to the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma.

Wirt, motivated by the idea of trading with the Indians, drove the remainder of his herd to the little town of Amargo, N.M. Amargo was located along the railroad tracks about eight miles east of Dulce, the agency headquarters for the Jicarilla reservation.

More next week on Emmet Wirt.

Weather

DATE HIGH LOW PRECIIP.
TYPE
DEPTH MOISTURE

4/5

51

29

S

1

.5`

4.6

39

26

R

T

.01

4/7

57

23

-

-

-

4/8

61

27

-

-

-

4/9

65

26

-

-

-

4/10

57

27

-

-

-

4/11

54

32

-

-

-