October 14, 1999

Editorials

Mail voting is underway

Though November 2 is the official day for the 1999 election, voters started casting their ballots in the county clerk and recorder's office earlier this week. So much for voting on the first Tuesday after the first Monday of November.

My ballot was in my post office box when I collected my mail over the weekend. I filled it out and dropped it in the ballot box in the clerk's office yesterday.

Your ballot must be marked with a No. 2 pencil, placed in the accompanying return envelope, and returned either by mail or in person to the county clerk's office no later than 7 p.m. on November 2. The return envelope has a space for you to sign your name and to list your address. I wrote my mailing address, or box number in this space. I was then asked to also list the physical address of my place of residence.

If you have not received your ballot, but know for certain that you are registered to vote, you better check at the clerk's office to be sure your correct mailing address is on the voter registration list. You also will need to pick up your ballot.

County Clerk June Madrid probably will run additional informative or instructional type articles, such as the one on page 1 of today's SUN, in the remaining two editions prior to the November 2 deadline.

Rather than waiting until the last minute, or missing the delivery deadline at the post office, once you think you are well informed on the candidates and issues that appear on the ballot, fill it out and return your ballot to the clerk's office.

David C. Mitchell

 

Dear Folks
By David C. Mitchell

It seems like the right thing

Dear Folks,

I started to add a note to Fitzhugh Havens' letter to the editor which appears in this week's letters section.

But I didn't want it to seem that I was being disrespectful of the county's staunchest opponent to government spending. Though I don't always agree with his positions, I do respect him.

Actually, I'm not certain that Mr. Havens is opposed to government spending. But based on the letters to the editor he has submitted to the SUN for almost half a century, it seems that he is opposed to government taxing.

But based on the past few county-wide elections, it seems that he is becoming selectively non-committal on some tax-related proposals.

After reading his letter for this week's edition, it seems that the word "seem" - as used in the last sentence of paragraph two and the last sentence in paragraph three - is the key word in Mr. Haven's interpretation of the state's constitution.

It seemed logical a couple of weeks ago at the League of Women Voters of Archuleta County forum that Mr. Havens presented the "con" position on the county's ballot proposal which asks voter approval to retain and spend excess revenues . . . without increasing its property tax mill levy or sales tax rates . . . ."

And it seems that he wrote the "Against" comment on the county's proposal that appeared on the "coordinated mail ballot" flyer the county clerk sent to registered voters earlier this month.

Yet it seems strange that Mr. Havens passed up an opportunity to take the "con" position or write an "Against" comment towards a very similar question the Upper San Juan Library District has placed on the 1999 ballot.

It likewise seemed strange last year that Mr. Havens remained silent when School District 50 Joint ". . . without imposing any new taxes, or increases in tax rates . . ." sought voter approval to ". . . collect, retain, and expend all revenues from all sources in 1998 and subsequent years . . . ." on the 1998 ballot.

As did a more than 2 to 1 majority last year, I voted for the school district's proposal. I likewise voted for the county's and the library district's proposal on this year's mail ballot. I hope a majority of the county voters also will do so.

Like Mr. Havens, I favor the TABOR amendment. It gives rural areas an effective form of protection in the Denver-Colorado Springs-Fort Collins-Pueblo metroplex-controlled state legislature. But such restrictive protection is hardly necessary at the local level in our county government, library district, school district or other local taxing entities.

Local officials are attentive to the concerns of the folks they know voted them into office, and they know they are easy targets for public scrutiny and recall elections.

It seems that if a majority of the county voters in last year's election were willing to trust the school board and release its directors from the restrictions of the TABOR amendment; a majority of the voters should extend the same vote of confidence to the county commissioners and the directors of the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library who are seeking approval of similar proposals in the ongoing mail-in election.

And please use a No. 2 pencil.

Know you are loved and please keep us in your prayers.

David

 

25 years ago

Alley resigns as commissioner

Taken from SUN files

of Oct. 17, 1974

George Alley, who has served on the board of county commissioners for the past eight years, tendered his resignation from the board on Oct. 7. Alley has also served on the board of county commissioners in the past. Reasons given for the resignation were ill health and personal reasons.

Local law officers, Wildlife Conservation Officers, the Mounted Rangers ambulance and a helicopter were all involved in a hunter-connected airlift Friday night and Saturday morning. Larry Bouvy, of Murfreesboro, Tenn., was flown to an Albuquerque hospital where he underwent brain surgery. Another hunter, also of Murfreesboro, is free on a $1,200 bond after being charged with first-degree assault.

A branch of the Four Corners Sheltered Workshop program has been established in this community. The number of employees vary from eight to 15 and more are needed. The self-sustaining program is designed to provide gainful employment for local residents who have educational, physical or cultural handicaps.

Hunting season in this area seems to be progressing normally. To date there has only been one serious incident in connection with hunters. The usual number of lost hunters have been reported but to date all have shown up without any serious problems.

 

Legacies
By Shari Pierce

Our county's early enterprising residents

Last week I relayed information about Abner J. Lewis from the 1899 "Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado." Other local residents were included in this chronicle of "well-known citizens" of the past and present. I'm not sure what the qualifications were to be included in this record, but it does mention several of our county's early enterprising residents. This week I'd like to share very brief accounts of more of those mentioned in the book.

Jose M. Archuleta Jr. was "the leading businessman" of Lumberton, N.M., and also a large property owner in this county. He came to Archuleta County in 1876 and settled on the Navajo River. By 1899, he had increased his herd to 1,500 cattle and 70,000 sheep which made him the largest stock dealer in the county.

For nine years, Archuleta had the government contract to supply beef to the Apache Reservation. He also was the owner of a general store in Lumberton.

In 1885, when this county was formed, Archuleta was elected county judge, an office that he held until he resigned in 1892 to give full attention to his business ventures.

Antonio Archuleta was an ex-senator from both Conejos and Archuleta counties. Archuleta moved to Archuleta County in 1887 where he became involved in farming and stock-raising. The Record reports he was one of the "most extensive agriculturists of the county." Through stock-raising he was "unusually successful, and through his energy and business ability has become well-to-do." According to this source, it was Archuleta who introduced the bill to separate Archuleta from Conejos County. "It was his intention to name the new county Pagosa, but his friends in the senate objected, and urged the adoption of Archuleta as the county name."

Victor C. McGirr was born and raised in Canada. After extensive education and traveling, he settled in Archuleta County in 1890, practicing law in Durango. He then served two years as principal at the high school in Rico and then for a year in Monte Vista. In 1897, he settled permanently in Pagosa Springs. He returned to the practice of law in Pagosa Springs and also served as town and county attorney. He and his wife, Hattie, operated a small ranch where they raised hereford cattle. The Record reported that McGirr was the only attorney in Archuleta County in 1899. The county had a population of about 3,000. Most legal business was in "the adjustment of estates, division of lands, fixing of boundaries, and other work of a similar nature."

More of this "who's who" list next week.

 

Inside The Sun

County forgives uncollected taxes

By John M. Motter

The Archuleta County commissioners agreed to do away with uncollected personal property taxes levied before 1990 while meeting in regular weekly session Tuesday.

After agreeing that the long overdue taxes are not collectible, the commissioners voted to wipe clean from county past-due tax rolls, those personal property taxes levied before 1990.

In addition, the commissioners are studying methods and policy changes relevant to overdue personal property taxes levied since 1989.

Personal property taxes are levied against the value of devices used by businesses to operate the business, and against the value of mobile homes when steps have not been taken to attach the mobile home permanently to the property which it occupies.

Approximately $19,570 was forgiven.

In other business the commissioners:

- Took no action to approve the final subdivision plat and improvements agreement for the Knolls Subdivision. The subdivision is located between a taxiway and a runway at Stevens Field. Several issues revolve around the question of ownership of an access right of way across the taxi way, the use of easements granted around the proposed development, and problems created by the weight of construction vehicles crossing the taxiway. In addition, a potential exists for future commercial development of the property increasing the likelihood of conflicts between vehicular traffic and aircraft.

- Gave final approval to a corridor study to be conducted in cooperation with the town and with the Colorado Department of Local Affairs.

- Changed the County Fair Board budget so that funding will move through the county finance office. In addition, the Archuleta County Airport Authority organizational structure was altered. In the future, Airport Manager Tim Smith will report directly to County Manager Dennis Hunt instead of to the Airport Authority board of directors.

- Agreed to provide a culvert to provide a bypass for the bridge accessing the Blanco River RV Park. The bridge could act as a dam in the event of a flood, according to Dave Rosgen, a river hydrologist. The culvert will bypass the bridge, relieving pressure against the structure and lengthening its life.

- Listened to an activity and progress report from director Cindy Archuleta on the Senior Citizens program and public transportation system.

- Refused a request for exemption from subdivision regulations presented by Don English and relating to a piece of property located along U.S. 84 south of Chromo.

- Took no action on Tom Steen's request for the commissioners to provide $10,000 to augment a building expansion plan for the Education Center.

- Approved the expenditure of $3,000 for a new freezer at the Senior Center and $3,745 for a copier at the jail

 

County reviews Y2K preparations of local governmental, utility firms

By John M. Motter

With less than three months remaining before the possible beginning of Y2K computer shenanigans, Ken Fox and his fellow county commissioners hosted a Y2K information exchange among local governmental agencies and utility firms.

The Tuesday meeting was the latest of a series of monthly meetings sponsored by the county and started almost a year ago to coordinate Y2K efforts among various local entities. All persons present at the meeting agreed that all Y2K emergency provisions can and should be used for any disaster creating emergency conditions in the county.

At Tuesdays meeting it was learned that:

- The town has almost completed installation of a backup generator to power the town's geothermal system. If electricity is lost in the area as some predict, the town will continue to operate the geothermal heating system used to heat a number of downtown buildings, including some of the school buildings.

A major Y2K fear is that loss of electricity will prevent homeowners from heating their homes. Serious, life-threatening consequences could result from not heating a house for a period of two days or longer given the potential for sub-zero weather in the Pagosa Springs area during January.

In addition, the town will acquire a certain amount of fuel to be used by town emergency vehicles in the event of a Y2K disaster.

- The school district anticipates opening junior high facilities in the event of an electrical power failure. Temporary sleeping could be accommodated in the gymnasiums. The junior high building is heated from the town geothermal system. The school district is also contemplating providing mass cooking and food serving facilities if needed.

- The county has arranged to stockpile fuel in the event of a Y2K emergency. In addition, steps are being taken to provide a communications coordination center and to keep central dispatch operating. The county fuel will be for county emergency vehicle purposes, not for public use. In addition, the Senior Center kitchen operated by the county to cook meals for the jail, senior citizens, and Headstart, is stockpiling food.

Ultimately, if central county communications breaks down, provision has been made to set up a communication system involving local Ham radio operators.

- Several local churches, through the area ministerial alliance, are prepared to feed 800 people once a day for 30 days. The meal will consist of soup and a couple of flour tortillas. Individual churches may provide additional food.

- Water supply and sewage collection systems in Pagosa Springs should continue to function because they are gravity operated. The same functions at Fairfield Pagosa vary. Some are gravity operated and some require electrical pumps. The Pagosa Area Water and Sanitation District, responsible for those services, has portable backup generators available to keep the various pumps running.

- La Plata Electric Association has tested local distribution systems and anticipates no problem providing electricity, according to spokesperson Debbie Bass. LPEA officials have done the same in Durango with the same results, Bass said. In addition, LPEA's electrical supplier has field tested its system and detected only minor glitches, Bass said.

- EMS facilities at the Dr. Mary Fisher Clinic will continue to operate because of a backup generator, according to Bill Bright, the director. That organization is also increasing radio communication capability, stockpiling certain medical supplies, and stockpiling emergency fuel.

- The Ruby Sisson Library has collected for public use a huge file of Y2K related information.

 

Editorials

Mail voting is underway

Though November 2 is the official day for the 1999 election, voters started casting their ballots in the county clerk and recorder's office earlier this week. So much for voting on the first Tuesday after the first Monday of November.

My ballot was in my post office box when I collected my mail over the weekend. I filled it out and dropped it in the ballot box in the clerk's office yesterday.

Your ballot must be marked with a No. 2 pencil, placed in the accompanying return envelope, and returned either by mail or in person to the county clerk's office no later than 7 p.m. on November 2. The return envelope has a space for you to sign your name and to list your address. I wrote my mailing address, or box number in this space. I was then asked to also list the physical address of my place of residence.

If you have not received your ballot, but know for certain that you are registered to vote, you better check at the clerk's office to be sure your correct mailing address is on the voter registration list. You also will need to pick up your ballot.

County Clerk June Madrid probably will run additional informative or instructional type articles, such as the one on page 1 of today's SUN, in the remaining two editions prior to the November 2 deadline.

Rather than waiting until the last minute, or missing the delivery deadline at the post office, once you think you are well informed on the candidates and issues that appear on the ballot, fill it out and return your ballot to the clerk's office.

David C. Mitchell

 

Dear Folks
By David C. Mitchell

It seems like the right thing

Dear Folks,

I started to add a note to Fitzhugh Havens' letter to the editor which appears in this week's letters section.

But I didn't want it to seem that I was being disrespectful of the county's staunchest opponent to government spending. Though I don't always agree with his positions, I do respect him.

Actually, I'm not certain that Mr. Havens is opposed to government spending. But based on the letters to the editor he has submitted to the SUN for almost half a century, it seems that he is opposed to government taxing.

But based on the past few county-wide elections, it seems that he is becoming selectively non-committal on some tax-related proposals.

After reading his letter for this week's edition, it seems that the word "seem" - as used in the last sentence of paragraph two and the last sentence in paragraph three - is the key word in Mr. Haven's interpretation of the state's constitution.

It seemed logical a couple of weeks ago at the League of Women Voters of Archuleta County forum that Mr. Havens presented the "con" position on the county's ballot proposal which asks voter approval to retain and spend excess revenues . . . without increasing its property tax mill levy or sales tax rates . . . ."

And it seems that he wrote the "Against" comment on the county's proposal that appeared on the "coordinated mail ballot" flyer the county clerk sent to registered voters earlier this month.

Yet it seems strange that Mr. Havens passed up an opportunity to take the "con" position or write an "Against" comment towards a very similar question the Upper San Juan Library District has placed on the 1999 ballot.

It likewise seemed strange last year that Mr. Havens remained silent when School District 50 Joint ". . . without imposing any new taxes, or increases in tax rates . . ." sought voter approval to ". . . collect, retain, and expend all revenues from all sources in 1998 and subsequent years . . . ." on the 1998 ballot.

As did a more than 2 to 1 majority last year, I voted for the school district's proposal. I likewise voted for the county's and the library district's proposal on this year's mail ballot. I hope a majority of the county voters also will do so.

Like Mr. Havens, I favor the TABOR amendment. It gives rural areas an effective form of protection in the Denver-Colorado Springs-Fort Collins-Pueblo metroplex-controlled state legislature. But such restrictive protection is hardly necessary at the local level in our county government, library district, school district or other local taxing entities.

Local officials are attentive to the concerns of the folks they know voted them into office, and they know they are easy targets for public scrutiny and recall elections.

It seems that if a majority of the county voters in last year's election were willing to trust the school board and release its directors from the restrictions of the TABOR amendment; a majority of the voters should extend the same vote of confidence to the county commissioners and the directors of the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library who are seeking approval of similar proposals in the ongoing mail-in election.

And please use a No. 2 pencil.

Know you are loved and please keep us in your prayers.

David

 

25 years ago

Alley resigns as commissioner

Taken from SUN files

of Oct. 17, 1974

George Alley, who has served on the board of county commissioners for the past eight years, tendered his resignation from the board on Oct. 7. Alley has also served on the board of county commissioners in the past. Reasons given for the resignation were ill health and personal reasons.

Local law officers, Wildlife Conservation Officers, the Mounted Rangers ambulance and a helicopter were all involved in a hunter-connected airlift Friday night and Saturday morning. Larry Bouvy, of Murfreesboro, Tenn., was flown to an Albuquerque hospital where he underwent brain surgery. Another hunter, also of Murfreesboro, is free on a $1,200 bond after being charged with first-degree assault.

A branch of the Four Corners Sheltered Workshop program has been established in this community. The number of employees vary from eight to 15 and more are needed. The self-sustaining program is designed to provide gainful employment for local residents who have educational, physical or cultural handicaps.

Hunting season in this area seems to be progressing normally. To date there has only been one serious incident in connection with hunters. The usual number of lost hunters have been reported but to date all have shown up without any serious problems.

 

Legacies
By Shari Pierce

Our county's early enterprising residents

Last week I relayed information about Abner J. Lewis from the 1899 "Portrait and Biographical Record of the State of Colorado." Other local residents were included in this chronicle of "well-known citizens" of the past and present. I'm not sure what the qualifications were to be included in this record, but it does mention several of our county's early enterprising residents. This week I'd like to share very brief accounts of more of those mentioned in the book.

Jose M. Archuleta Jr. was "the leading businessman" of Lumberton, N.M., and also a large property owner in this county. He came to Archuleta County in 1876 and settled on the Navajo River. By 1899, he had increased his herd to 1,500 cattle and 70,000 sheep which made him the largest stock dealer in the county.

For nine years, Archuleta had the government contract to supply beef to the Apache Reservation. He also was the owner of a general store in Lumberton.

In 1885, when this county was formed, Archuleta was elected county judge, an office that he held until he resigned in 1892 to give full attention to his business ventures.

Antonio Archuleta was an ex-senator from both Conejos and Archuleta counties. Archuleta moved to Archuleta County in 1887 where he became involved in farming and stock-raising. The Record reports he was one of the "most extensive agriculturists of the county." Through stock-raising he was "unusually successful, and through his energy and business ability has become well-to-do." According to this source, it was Archuleta who introduced the bill to separate Archuleta from Conejos County. "It was his intention to name the new county Pagosa, but his friends in the senate objected, and urged the adoption of Archuleta as the county name."

Victor C. McGirr was born and raised in Canada. After extensive education and traveling, he settled in Archuleta County in 1890, practicing law in Durango. He then served two years as principal at the high school in Rico and then for a year in Monte Vista. In 1897, he settled permanently in Pagosa Springs. He returned to the practice of law in Pagosa Springs and also served as town and county attorney. He and his wife, Hattie, operated a small ranch where they raised hereford cattle. The Record reported that McGirr was the only attorney in Archuleta County in 1899. The county had a population of about 3,000. Most legal business was in "the adjustment of estates, division of lands, fixing of boundaries, and other work of a similar nature."

More of this "who's who" list next week.

 

Community News
Local Chatter
By Kate Terry

Christmas Cantata in seventh year

One of the things going on in town these days is the weekly practice for the Christmas Cantata scheduled for Dec. 10 and Dec. 12 at Community Bible Church.

This is the seventh year for this program sponsored by the Mountain Heights Baptist Church. Marie Jones (Mrs. Mack) is the director. The program is two-fold: The first part includes selections from "The Majesty and Glory of Christmas" by Kearn Fettke, and the second part, Christmas selections from George Frederick Handel's oratorio, "The Messiah."

Again this year concert pianist Richard Schiro will come from Los Angeles to accompany the chorus. Richard used to live in Pagosa Springs and has many friends here. This is his third year to come back to join in. He'll arrive Dec. 6.

Marie Jones has an assistant this year - Dr. Al Landis, principal at Our Savior Lutheran School and a fine musician, who is rehearsing the men. And, by the way, there is always the need for men. Practices are Tuesday evenings, 7 to 9 p.m. at Mountain Heights Baptist Church.

The call went out in September and 100 persons have registered. The average practice attendance is 72. Last year, three persons came from Ignacio, sometimes driving through a snow storm to get here. This year there are seven people from the Ignacio-Allison area and one from Durango coming.

The comradeship is evident. Recently someone brought cookies. Refreshments at rehearsals aren't the usual thing, but time was taken out to enjoy them. Marie Jones says the rehearsals are a spiritual experience and members who have taken part in past years rave about how everything is coming together as early as now.

This is a spectacular program. Be sure to put it on your calendar.

About town

The Music Boosters fun program, "S'Wonderful," an all-Gershwin program, is sponsored by the Pagosa Springs Music Boosters. The show is lively and put together joyfully by good musicians. The talent is exceptional and fun sweeps throughout. Tickets are $10 and worth every cent. Get tickets at the door tomorrow night or Saturday night or at Moonlight Books or The Wild Hare.

Pagosa Springs Art Council sponsors the Creede Theatre when it tours and gets to Pagosa. The play on Friday is combined with a dinner. Tickets are at the PSAC Gallery, 264-5020. A comedy, "The Complete History of America," is the production and the Creede Repertory Theatre is one of the best in the country.

And if you haven't seen the items for the Civic Club's annual raffle (a part of the Civic Club's Holiday Bazaar) please check out the display cases at Sisson Library.

There are many very good items this year. Tickets are only $1 or 6 for $5 and are available at the Library or call Margaret Wilson at 264-4246.

The money from the sale of tickets goes to Sisson and the library needs the money. Usually the money goes for some big item.

Fun on the run

A woman was waiting in the checkout line at a shopping center. Her arms were heavily laden with a mop and broom and other cleaning supplies. By her actions and deep sighs, it was obvious she was in a hurry and not happy about the slowness of the line.

When the cashier called for a price check on a box of soap, the woman remarked indignantly, "Well, I'll be lucky to get out of here by Christmas!"

"Don't worry, ma'am," replied the clerk. "With all that wind kicking up out there and that brand new broom you have here, you'll be home in no time."

 

Chamber News
By Sally Hameister

Chambers get head start on volunteer appreciation

Four new members to welcome to the Chamber family this week and 22 renewals - we're lovin' it. Thank you all for such a terrific response and to those of you who need a little nudge, the reminders will be going out in the next week or two. Just keep those cards and letters rolling in.

New member number one this week is Nancy North with North Chiropractic located at 245 Hot Springs Boulevard. Nancy offers family and sports chiropractic and specializes in extremity and foot problems. She is a post graduate national and international instructor as well and invites you to give her a call at 264-3303 for an appointment. Sylvia Murray racked up yet another free SunDowner for recruiting Nancy and our thanks to her once again for her recruitment efforts.

Those wild and wacky B & B women are at it once again with a new addition to their list of services. I have more than a strong suspicion that these women never sleep - just work 24 hours a day. Lynne Brown and Mary Baldwin of B & B Lawn Care and Landscape and B & B Movers now join us with B & B Commercial Cleaning. We await their description but just wanted you to be aware of their new addition. You may call them at 264-3313 to learn more about B & B Commercial Cleaning.

David Durfee joins us next with Rocky Mountain Small Engine, LLC, located at 38 Vista Boulevard, Building C. I anticipate that David will enjoy tremendous success with his new business judging from the number of calls we've had about small engine repair. He can help you with sales, repairs and maintenance of small engine equipment (chain saws, lawn mowers, snow blowers, generators and the like.) He also offers a machine shop and mobile service. To learn more about David's new business, please call 731-1112.

We're happy to welcome John Smith, a very nice gentleman, as a Real Estate Associate with Coldwell Banker, The Pagosa Group. John will be happy to help you find whatever it is that you are looking for whether it's a home or property. He invites you to give him a call today at (800) 888-5755 so that you can get started on finding just the right thing for you.

Renewals

Ready, set, go on our lovely list of renewals this week: Cathy Justus with Just Us Originals; Lynn Johnson with Custom Homes by Curt Johnson; Ray Finney with Colorado Housing, Inc.; R.D. Hott with the San Juan Historical Society; M. Margaret (Maggie) Dix-Caruso, R.A., with Envelopment Architecture, LLC; Mary Jo Coulehan with the Humane Society of Pagosa Springs; Shellie Hogue with Hogue's Glass of Pagosa, Inc.; Larry Fisher with Ski and Bow Rack, Inc.; Pagosa Lakes Property Owners Association; Kathleen M. Sullivan, Attorney at Law; Alex Mickel with AAE's Mild to Wild Rafting, Inc.; Lois Higgins with the Made in Colorado Shoppe; Karen Scholl with Parelli Natural Horse-Man-Ship; Nan Rowe with Oso Grande Ranch Outfitting, Rocky Mountain Reefs of Pagosa, and Oso Grande Ranch; Lynne Brown and Mary Baldwin with B & B Movers and B & B Lawncare and Landscape; Jim Laydon with Peppers Mexican Restaurant; Roger Modrow with Eagle's View Cedar Homes and SunRooms; Kuderca/Moore with Heritage Custom Homes; and, last but certainly not least, my old pal, J. Curtis Hinton with Pagosa Lodge. Thank you all for your continued support.

On the move

Speaking of old pals and I do mean old, Mary, members Don and Mary McKeehan, owners of Old West Press, have been scrubbing, painting, and schlepping for a few weeks in preparation for their move right next door. They will be closed tomorrow (Oct. 15) to do the painful actual physical move and plan to open their doors for business on Monday in the new digs. You won't have to look too hard for them - just one door west of their existing place at 2143 West U.S. 160. Stop by to say hello and congratulate them on the move.

Thanks

Many thanks to our friends, Andrea and Steve Heboian, for allowing us to use their big screen room for the Interviewing Magic workshop last Wednesday. They kindly donated the room to us for this workshop and we are so grateful to them for their continuing generosity. Jim Lawrence of Anco Southwest Insurance Services, Inc. presented a terrific workshop on the challenges of hiring the ideal employee and all who attended benefited greatly from the tips Jim passed along. Interviewing is the most critical piece of hiring and maintaining good employees and I know I picked up some invaluable information. We hope we can persuade Jim to come back a few times more with workshops for businesses. If there is something in particular you would like on a workshop agenda, please let us know and we'll do what we can.

Volunteer appreciation

Those posters popping up all over town are announcing this year's Volunteer Appreciation Week taking place the week of Oct. 25 through Oct. 29. We observe this week to create an opportunity for all of us who benefit so much from the generosity of those who donate so much of their time and talents to our particular business or organization - our volunteers. The Chamber of Commerce has around 55 of these kind-hearted souls who host our Visitor Center seven days a week throughout the summer and weekends during the winter. Just remember that they act as hosts for every Chamber of Commerce business in our area and are expected to know absolutely everything about absolutely everything on a daily basis. We are holding a luncheon in their honor next week in an inadequate but sincere attempt to express our gratitude to them for all they do for us. Once again, it doesn't have to be anything big or elaborate, but simply an acknowledgment of appreciation. We couldn't keep our doors open at the Visitor Center without our Diplomats and, frankly, there is no way in the world we could ever properly thank them for all they do for us. Thankfully, these folks do what they do out of love and never really expect anything in return - there are no strings attached to their acts of kindness. At any rate, please remember those who give so much during Volunteer Appreciation Week.

Gershwin review

Don't forget to buy your tickets for this weekend's Music Boosters production of "S' Wonderful" at the high school auditorium. I am a particularly enthusiastic Gershwin fan and am very much looking forward to humming along with all the marvelous Gershwin tunes (smart people will make sure they are several rows removed from me that evening). Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday nights and you may purchase your tickets at Moonlight Books or The Wild Hare. Hope to see everyone there.

 

Pagosa Lakes
By Ming Steen

Koch teaches master swim clinic at Rec Center

A master swim clinic will be conducted today at the Pagosa Lakes Recreation Center from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Natalie Koch, coach of the Pagosa Lakes Swim Club, will be teaching the clinic. She will focus on important stroke techniques of the four competition strokes. Specific emphasis will be placed on arm position, arm entry, maintaining a streamlined position and kick drills to enhance the power of the kick. Please call Ming Steen or Andrew Pimental at the Recreation Center, 731-2051, for additional information. The Recreation Center is interested in organizing a master swim club. Give us feedback if this is something you would be interested in.

Fall fish stocking. Three lakes in Pagosa Lakes have been stocked this week with 13- to 17-inch rainbow trout. Fall fishing should be excellent with 1,200 pounds of rainbow trout stocked into Hatcher Lake, 800 pounds of rainbows stocked into Lake Pagosa and 600 pounds of rainbows stocked into Lake Forest. We also threw in a few trophy-sized rainbows to keep things interesting. Anglers have been having good success on spinner baits and bead-head patterns. Good luck and good fishing.

A Pagosa Lakes newsletter mailing will go out on Oct. 18. Volunteers are needed to assist in preparing the mailing which will begin at 9 a.m. A continental breakfast will be served. See you at the Pagosa Lakes Community Center.

Attention parents of young children and child-care providers. An early childhood workshop for affective discipline will be offered tonight at the Education Center from 6 to 9. The workshop will be conducted by Marcia Vinning. Please call Juanita at 264-2022 for details.

The PLPOA monthly board meeting will be held tonight at 7 in the Pagosa Lakes Community Center. Members and observers are encouraged to attend. Public comments are heard at the beginning of the meeting.

The following agenda for tonight's meeting was provided by the Pagosa Lakes Property Owners Association:

- Call to order

- Approval of agenda

- Approval of board meeting minutes

- General manager's report

- Generator hookup

- North Pagosa Boulevard trail construction

- Comp-time

- Relocation of radio-controlled air field to south end of Vista Lake, Parcel A

- 1998 Audit

- Preliminary 2000 budget

- Certification of the deed restrictions for Mallard Point

- Public comments

- Committee reports

- Status of Audit Committee, Ad Hoc or Standing

- Status of Finance Advisory Committee, Ad Hoc or Standing

- Old business

- New business

- Pagosa Springs Area Association of Realtors - Transfer Fee

- Resolution 99-45 - Rule enforcement and fine imposition procedures

- Resolution 99-46 - Establishing an investment policy for PLPOA

- Resolution 99-47 - Setting 2000 user fees for the Pagosa Lakes Ralph H. Eaton Recreation Center

- Millennium 2000 pocket calendars

- Duplicate bridge group request to change schedule

- Request from property owner Joe Donavan to rescind Resolution 99-42 - Policy for access to association records.

 

Education News
By Tom Steen

Students pitch in to help Girardins

The Education Center is busting at the seams with this year's Archuleta County High School alternative high school program. Forty-Eight students are enrolled in day and evening classes at the Ed Center, with spillover classes taking place at the Methodist Church's upstairs classrooms. Fortunately, we also have our piece of the global classroom, the local community in which to hold classes.

The students have been juggling a number of projects with the most visible being the benefit they are organizing for local resident Bobby Girardin. Bobby was seriously injured in a motorcycle accident earlier this summer and has extensive medical bills. How did this benefit idea come about? Lets back up 2 weeks.

Ex-gang member turned probation officer (and current bandleader of the Jah Kings, a touring/recording reggae band) Alexander Washington contacted me to say that his band would be in town playing for a Hopi gathering at Chimney Rock and again this Friday at Endaba. Was there anything they could do to benefit the youth in the community? Aside from speaking with our students today (Thursday) the band, through an idea from student Jeremy Gallegos, will be performing from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. tonight with proceeds going to Bobby Girardin's fund set up the Bank of the San Juans.

Once the students decided to make this happen, they designed a flyer outlining the concert and last Thursday hit the street visiting businesses for donations. They returned to the Ed Center and piled checks and cash on a table where students Stephen Crouse and Emory Draper counted the contributions for a total of $660 donated by the community in about two hours! A mention of the project at the weekly Kiwanis meeting prompted their donating concessions for the dance and Kiwanians will be doing the cooking with students. A resident handed me $50 saying, "This is to pay for one of the band members." Donations were further enhanced through students Michelle Herrera and Lisa Terrasas visiting the Rotary Club's weekly meeting.

And so it goes. Motivation can be a challenge unless students find a reason to "buy into" school. For some, good grades are enough. For others, recognition is the key. Still others are motivated by a paycheck. In this case, it was a chance to help a friend, and the remainder of the class came on board through the excitement of their peers and knowing that they could accomplish whatever they set out to do as a group.

One element of alternative education which remains a constant is the need for a strong relationship. Relationships between students need to be strong for them to complete the many indoor and outdoor group initiatives we challenge them with. How do teachers build strong relationships with the students? Students need to utilize their teachers and bring us through the activities with them. Voila! The student becomes the teacher and a positive relationship must grow in order for us to reach our group goals together. One activity we completed on the first day of school was called "turning over a new leaf" and involved 30 students and two teachers standing together on a 10x12 foot tarp. The goal? Turn the tarp over without anyone's feet touching the ground, or begin again if they do. The students cannot accomplish the goal unless they discuss the problem, offer suggestions, listen to each other and then help each other out. If we can stay focused on the desired end result, the conflicts which arise, will be worked out, communication between participants will be enhanced and the task will be completed. Is the goal to flip the tarp? The goal is to work together in a safe environment and be a productive contributing member of a team. The goal is to have someone walk away from a post activity debrief and be able to say "I can do this and if I can do it here, I can do it in the classroom and in the community and at home." The first day we flipped a tarp. The group is now at the point where they have been able to organize and run tonight's dance. Is the goal to run the dance? You know the answer to that one!

If you're attending the Music Boosters production of "S'Wonderful" this weekend, say hello to Jeremy Gallegos, Stephen Crouse and Jimmy Cardenas; three of our students who are stage crew members on the set.

As a school-wide project, students have been interviewing local residents concerning changes that have occurred in Pagosa. The interviews will be available as a magazine in early December.

I will leave you with a favorite quote from noted anthropologist Margaret Mead: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

 

Library News
by Lenore Bright

Civic Club Bazaars began in '74

We did a little historical digging to find out just how long the Civic Club ladies have been holding their Holiday Bazaar. A note in the Pagosa SUN back in 1974 talks about the first effort. The annual event is still going strong with Nov. 6 on the calendar for this one. Scotty Gibson tells me the plans are well under way and good food and fun are in store as always.

I've seen the raffle items and want to win them all. Come by the library and see the treasures. Preview the stained glass piece, money wreath and basket; Cheryl Barlow's latest clayorama, and many more items. How fortunate we are to have so many talented people willing to donate their time and talent.

Women Voters

Thanks to the League for inviting many of us to speak about ballot issues and to meet the candidates for the school board. This year, the library board of trustees will be asking voters to allow the Upper San Juan Library District, also known as the Ruby M. Sisson Memorial Library, to keep and spend its revenue without raising its legal 1.5 percent property tax mill levy. Other governments - the county, a sanitation district and a fire district - have similar requests. One state question concerns highways.

The TABOR amendment limits how much money each government entity can receive and spend each year. The courts have continually held that the TABOR amendment was meant to limit the growth of government, not destroy it. Taxes pay for our services and we get to choose which services we want whether it is good roads, fire protection or adequate, safe drinking water.

TABOR is complicated and few people understand all of its ramifications. It affects every single government entity - the state, each county, town and special districts. Every taxpayer lives in and is served by many districts. Examples of districts are fire, hospital, library, water and sanitation. Each entity must have an election to decide how much it can collect and spend. There have been 356 municipal elections since TABOR passed. In 325 of those elections, 91.2 percent of voters chose to spend money for their services.

The state will be giving everyone a refund next year. This does not have any connection with local government issues.

Ballots should be in your hands by now. You can take your time and study the issues at home. What a privilege.

News

Our Kris Bowen, now the library director in Show Low, Ariz., recently was part of a delegation visiting their sister city of Spisske Podhradie, Slovakia. She sent us press coverage of the trip. She had this to say, "After spending time in Slovakia, the world is an infinitely smaller place to me… exchanges such as this help us realize that most peoples of the world want the same things; safety for their children; food and shelter; an economy vital enough to provide jobs; and a standard of living that is consistent and comfortable. Seeking the most diplomatic course of actions when considering how to resolve problems with foreign neighbors becomes even more compelling when they are friends. No one wants to bomb friends."

If you'd like to read Kris' article, ask for it at the desk.

Donations

Financial support came from Albert and Liz Schnell in memory of Thelma Risinger. Materials came from Carla Roberts, Phil McClendon, Keith Olinger, Phyllis Bogert, Garry Halquist, Earle Beasley, Gary McNaughton, Judy Cecka and Carole Howard. Thank you all.

 

Arts Line
By Katherine Cruse

Exhibit features 'home portrait artist'

The works of "Denny Rose," aka Carol Fulenwider, award-winning local artist, will be on display from Oct. 14 until Oct. 27, at the Pagosa Springs Arts Council Gallery in Town Park.

Carol creates landscapes and floral paintings, but she is probably best known for her portraits of family homes and landmark buildings. A reception to open the show will be held today from 5 to 7 p.m. at the gallery. This is a chance to meet this dynamic "home portrait artist" in person and enjoy her work.

Although she originally painted in oils, Carol eventually discovered that watercolor was her best means of expression. Carol will be demonstrating her watercolor techniques the next two Saturdays, Oct. 16 and Oct. 23, from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the gallery in Town Park.

Theater weekend

A dinner theater production of the hilarious "The Complete History of America (Abridged)," performed by the Creede Repertory Theatre Players and sponsored by the Pagosa Springs Arts Council, comes to Pagosa Springs Oct. 15, at the Parish Hall on Lewis Street. A cash wine bar is open at 6:30 p.m., with dinner at 7 p.m. and the performance at 8 p.m. You can get tickets at the Arts Center/Gallery at Town Park, at Moonlight Books, the Library or Wolf Tracks Bookstore and Coffee Co. Tickets will also be available Friday night at the door. Call 264-5020 for more information.

If you attend "The Complete History of America (Abridged)" on Friday night, that still gives you a chance to see and hear the Pagosa Springs Music Boosters' tribute to George Gershwin, "S'Wonderful," on Saturday, Oct. 16, at the High School Auditorium. The show also plays on Friday night. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available at Moonlight Books or The Wild Hare.

What a weekend!

Competition winners

The PSAC announces the winners in the second annual Watermedia Competition.

Child (under 12) - first place, Ashley Iverson; second place, Bradley Iverson.

In the Adult Novice category Evangeline Catchpole took first and second places.

Adult Amateur winners were: first place, Pat W. Fregia; second place, Cate Smock; and third place, Ruth Carr.

In the Adult Professional category first place and Best of Show went to Mary Cardin, for "River Iris"; Denny Rose took second place for "A Sunny Fall Afternoon"; and third place was a tie between two of Deborah Robinson's works: "Her Heart is Full" and "Summer Roses."

The judge for the watermedia contest was Pagosa Springs resident Pierre Mion, whose works have been commissioned to illustrate a wide variety of subjects, from combat in Viet Nam to South American gold mines to recovery of Apollo 16 and he has worked with Carl Sagan, Jacques Cousteau, Isaac Asimov, Werner Von Braun and Arthur C. Clarke. His clients have included the National Geographic Society, Smithsonian Magazine, NASA, Life magazine, the U.S. Postal Service and the National Park Service. Pierre uses his art to both inform and please other people. According to Mion, "Great joy for me is capturing the fragile beauty of our planet."

Works by the many talented artists who entered the watermedia contest are on display at Moonlight Books through Oct. 29. You have one more week to stop in and vote for your favorite painting to receive the Peoples' Choice ribbon. Many thanks to Moonlight Books owners, Joan and Jerry Rohwer, for providing the space. And all you watercolorists out there, be thinking about your entries for next year.

More music

Whistle Pig, the monthly folk night sponsored by the Pagosa Springs Arts Council, will be coming 'round again on Oct. 23, at the Pagosa Lakes Community Center at 230 Port Avenue. Featured this month will be Harry Banana and the Bunch, the Group With A'peal. Time is 7 p.m. and a $4 donation is suggested. Bring the kids for free.

Christmas is coming

Learn how to make beautiful and personal Christmas cards in watercolor. The PSAC is offering two watercolor Christmas cards workshops by artist Mary Cardin at the gallery in Town Park, on Friday, Oct. 29, and Saturday, Nov. 13. Each workshop will be a full day, from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. The cost is $35, plus materials. (The list of materials to bring will be given out at registration.) Enrollment is limited to 12 persons in each workshop and registration is by payment and on a first come basis. visit the Gallery in Town Park between 11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, before Oct. 27, to register.

The annual PSAC Christmas Shoppe will be Dec. 2 through Dec. 23. Local artists and crafters, think Christmas. Please call Joanne at the gallery at 264-5020 for more information. Remember, the gallery is closed most of November, so sign up soon.

Reminder

The Gallery in Town Park is now operating under winter schedule and is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Pagosa Springs artists who are interested in exhibiting in the year 2000 can come in to pick up applications during those hours.

 

Senior News
By Cindy Archuleta

New stops added to Mountain Express bus route

Soon, very soon, the Mountain Express buses will have their logos placed on them and you will be able to find printed brochures and bus schedules for the route from Turkey Springs Trading Post to Pagosa Springs.

New stops were added due to public demand. They began Sept. 7 and include the stop on the southwest corner of 4th Street and Lewis Street (Mountain Greenery) which services the middle school and downtown area. The stop at the 8th Street alley and Zuni Street serves San Juan Basin Health, Senior Center, Casa de Los Arcos and is only a block and a half from the high school. This stop is close enough to be safe with the crosswalk on 8th Street.

A later route was also added. The advantage to the community is children can get home after sports practice and local citizens will know there will be a reliable ride to and from work should there be three feet of snow.

Congratulations to Helen La Bello, our new Senior of the Week. Helen is one of our newest members at the Senior Center along with her brother John Agosta.

Welcome to Pat and Hannah Foster who also are new members.

Please keep in mind the LEAP presentation and the hearing impaired and emotional stress presentations that are scheduled for this month.

We have a special course being offered by Patricia Heck starting Oct. 21. You can conquer your pain. Of course, it's easy to get discouraged and decide to "just live with it." But there are lots of ways to improve the way you feel. Deciding what will work can be hard, since there are so many people pushing their own "cure" for their own profit. Choosing what solutions are worth trying will be easier for those who come to the seminar sponsored by the Senior Center and Registered Nurse Trish Heck.

Learn how pain affects the whole person and how different therapies work. Learn the advantages and disadvantages of different medications, treatments and lifestyle changes. Get to ask questions about your own illness and learn from the successes of the other group members. Make a plan for taking back control of your life.

The six classes, lasting one hour, will be held at 10 a.m. at the Senior Center on Oct. 21, Oct. 28, Nov. 4, Nov. 11, Nov. 18 and Dec. 2. Sign up at the Senior Center or call Trish Heck at 264-6021. The cost is $15 per session. The Senior Center is offering scholarships for six people. Talk to Cindy Archuleta for more information.

Remember, the Senior Choice meal will be held on Oct. 18 with the Halloween costume party and contest on Oct. 29.

 

Features
Video Review
By Roy Starling

Bambi: Stay away from the meadows

Let me be the first noncommercial entity to say it:

Welcome Hunters.

The sportsmen in camo and blaze orange are back, anxious to get back in touch with their primal hunting-and-gathering instincts, escaping the hustle and bustle of late 20th-century civilization by setting forth into the solitude of the vast, peaceful wilderness, where hundreds of men, armed with only high-powered rifles, will face off against the beasts of the wild.

While the yellow of aspen leaves creeps down the sides of mountains, lines of shopping carts creep towards the humming cash registers at the grocery store. On Pagosa Street, it's every pedestrian for himself, as lud-lud-ludding 4 X 4 extended cab diesel dualies pulling horse trailers roll through town as determined and single-minded as a procession of military vehicles headed for the front during wartime.

Today, the peaceful hills, the vast wilderness, the venerable Rockies are alive with the sound of ATVs and crackling rifle shots as the annual harvest continues. They say this is going to be an excellent year for deer and elk, meaning it's going to be a rotten year to be a deer or an elk.

Anyway, this is always a special time for me, and I like to celebrate it by reviewing a video that's appropriate for the season. Last year, as my loyal readers will remember, I reviewed "Deliverance" and "The Little Princess."

This year I was considering "Blair Witch Project," an upbeat little comedy about all the fun things that can happen in the woods, but it's still not out on video.

I also thought about some really obvious hunting movies: "Deer Hunter," "Hunt for Red October," "Night of the Hunter" and "Pillow Talk." Then I realized it had been a long time since I'd written about a movie for young people.

So let's take a look at that hunting classic, "Bambi" (1942). As you probably already know, it began as a story by Siegmund Salzmann, also known as Felix Salten, written in German in 1923.

In some ways "Bambi" isn't much different from the animated films of today: the animals all speak in English (to Disney's credit, he did ax a scene from the book in which two leaves carry on a conversation), have human facial expressions and share such human traits as sorrow, love and a sense of humor.

The similarities end there. "Bambi" has no big-name stars doing the voices of its critters, no Robin Williams, Danny DeVito, Rodney Dangerfield, Whoopi Goldberg, Zsa Zsa Gabor, James Earl Jones, Phyllis Diller, Billy Crystal or Dennis Leary. In fact, the voice of Thumper the rabbit was done by an actual 4-year-old boy named Peter Behn, as we learn from the Special Collector's Edition's Magic Behind the Movie Documentary shown after the Feature Presentation.

Also, there are no hit songs to be played on VH1 or easy-listening radio stations. No Whitney Houston, no Celine Dion, no Linda Ronstadt, no Elton John. In fact, I think the film had only four songs, their titles being, as far as I can tell, "Love Is a Song that Never Ends," "Drip, Drip, Drop, Little April Shower," "Let's Sing a Song of the Spring," and "I Bring You a Song."

Also, there were no Bambi action figures back in 1942.

Also, the animation is absolutely brilliant. The depth of field in the always dark and shadowy forest, the moonlight-dappled river, the little Treasure Falls look-alike seen in the distance, drops of dew sliding off leaves - it's a rich, textured world, much like the one we live in, but seen with a vivid imagination. Technology still hasn't caught up with the animation of the '30s and '40s.

Also, the film has no real storyline. I guess it's something like watching BambiCam on the Internet. "Bambi" follows a life - Bambi's - and the seasons and cycles of life experienced by that life.

The film begins in darkness, when the earth is without visible form, then day slowly breaks, and we learn that a new prince is born. We see a kind of animal nativity scene: the tiny spotted baby Bambi curled up next to his mother, a doe-eyed . . . well, doe.

The creatures of the forest celebrate, and they're all incredibly cute, even the disgusting bats (probably rabid), hanging upside down. In a communal spirit somewhat different from the one displayed by the animals in the Weminuche Wilderness, the animals all go to work teaching Bambi English and how to walk.

While these creatures are still singing their songs of innocence, I like the fact that the animators keep the forest dark. We, the insightful viewers, are alerted that this joy is temporary, these songs cannot last, bright things can quickly come to confusion.

As though to emphasize this precarious life in Nature, the film follows with a thunderstorm, and that "Drip, Drip, Drop" song I was telling you about earlier. Lightning flashes and thunder rumbles as the sky rejuvenates the earth, and you suspect that something in the woods - an isolated tree, a baby bird - gave up its life in this furious storm.

Danger is more directly introduced to Bambi in the following scene when his mom takes him to the meadow. She must go first and sniff, look and listen, because "there might be danger here." It's her way of saying to Bambi, "There's no cover here, so we could be shot like rats in a barrel."

Shortly afterwards, we see the animals go into their panic mode when they are told that "Man is in the forest." Yes, there are Welcome Hunters in the area, and every creature hastily heads for cover. One cowering partridge, however, panics, flies into the open and is promptly riddled with buckshot, his feathers dropping like sparks from a Roman candle. Now we know: This is a kids' movie that's not afraid to acknowledge death.

After the partridge is polished off, fall arrives, then winter, and the water becomes "stiff," as Thumper puts it. Then comes spring again, the time for new life, for . . . another hunting season?! Doh!

Now, 45 minutes into the movie, comes the scene that stayed so long with youthful moviegoers of the '40s and '50s. As the bullets begin to whistle through the air, Bambi's mom sends her little prince ahead of her, and when he has safely escaped the deadly meadow and is gasping in the shelter of the forest, he says, "We made it, Mother! We made it! Mother?"

His mother can't respond. She has been - how to put this? - harvested by a Welcome Hunter.

Bambi's dad does not console the little guy by saying, "Your mom has returned to the Circle of Life." He tells him, "Your mother can't be with you anymore."

Still, life goes on, and shortly after this tragedy, the birds start singing their song of spring, Bambi becomes a 4-point buck, falls in love with Faline, then battles it out for her with a bad buck, both backlit, in eclipse, as it were, on the dark forest floor.

Flower the skunk and Thumper also find mates and, you know how it goes, one thing leads to another, and there are soon baby skunks and bunnies all over everywhere.

You'd think the film would end here with this effusion of new life. Maybe it should have. But nooo.

Evil returns to the forest. Us. "It is Man. There are many this time." Great. Why can't this movie pick on other predators for a while? Why can't it show one of the little creatures being gobbled up by a mountain lion?

This time a fire starts at an unattended Welcome Hunter's campfire, causing a regular holocaust in the forest. As the forest had earlier been cleansed by rain, it is now purged by an apocalyptic orange blaze.

After this final adventure, Bambi's father, who has seen fire and rain, hands over the reins to Bambi (saying, in effect, "Take the rein, deer"), who will now reign in his place. The cycle, the rise and fall of kingdoms, is complete.

Other than being saddened by Bambi's mom being rendered into venison, I don't remember much about my initial reaction to the film back when I was a little boy watching it in Woodard's Theater in Madison, Fla.

Now I see it as a lyrical statement on life's inevitable seasons, its comings and goings, its births and deaths, its pleasures, pains, beauties and hazards. It reminds me that even if there's no one shooting at you every time you stroll into the meadow, life can be awfully tough.

In this season we call Hunting, I hope our visitors enjoy their stay in our little town and our big hills. I hope they don't accidentally kill a cow or a horse or a moose or a hiker. I hope they yield to pedestrians at crosswalks. And I hope they'll remember our two most important mottoes:

Please Wipe Your Feet, then Shop Pagosa First.

 

Food for Thought
By Karl Isberg

'Click' helps keep things simple

The room is dark. I've got the covers pulled up to my chin, my arms are at my sides, my eyes are wide open.

I've got the old thinking cap on. I am working overtime.

This is where and when I get my best work done. Fast work. Very fast.

In my mental universe, things must happen quickly. I have an attention deficit problem: Too much thought, too much concentration, too many options, are discomfiting. I am easily distracted. I flit from idea to idea with the haste of a fruit fly in a mating frenzy.

I am an omen, a portent of things to come: a high-velocity, paper-thin consciousness operating in total darkness. My rapid-fire thought process is an example of what will soon be common to the entire species. My Teflon intellectual life is a paradigm case of what will be the norm for humankind within a generation.

As I lie awake in my little bed, I ask myself: What, beside a series of head injuries, is responsible for this incredible lack of concentration, the need to cull and compress information, to render things rapidly and ridiculously clear? This way of dealing with existence is fast becoming the way most Americans apprehend the world. Were millions of other people clobbered in the noggin by a baseball-bat-wielding Danny Freeman during a softball game at Lincoln Elementary School?

No, they were not. And yet, the average American's ability to concentrate over prolonged periods of time is eroding. The day will come in the near future when the same will be said of the citizens of Zaire, of Paraguay, of Butan. Something is responsible.

What is behind this shift in the duration, depth and quality of mental activity? I've compiled a list of possible causes, creations that have changed the temporal nature of the things that happen to us, changed the way we think.

The telephone, for example. The advent of rapid personal communications. With a single wire, a light-bearing fiber, a world is in your ear in an instant. Aunt Gladys in Davenport is no longer a week away by mail.

The airplane - a device that puts Tangier in your pocket, Beijing in your back yard. With space travel, Mars is an adjacent county.

The electric light bulb. Daylight no longer sets the timetable for enterprise. Night becomes day. More things happen, faster.

The computer. Ditch the slide rule, forget about writing that letter in long hand. Access the data, run the numbers, scan the photos, digitalize everything, everyone. Fax yourself at 56,000 Kbps. From the abacus to the gigabyte - this journey has to make a difference.

Microwave ovens. You heat barely edible food in a tenth the time it would take you to heat barely edible food in a conventional oven. An evolutionary step up from the boilin' bag.

Television. Suddenly, you are with Queen Elizabeth, Gorbachev, Bubba Clinton, Tara Lipinski. You are a party to what is happening, as it happens. You are told what is important, before it is important. Your space is flush with photons. You sit in front of a digital display as "War and Peace" is delivered by satellite in a mini-series format, with plenty of commercials to boot. It is all there, all done for you. Quickly, choppily.

Now I'm getting to the point.

Great choices I think, but there is one more: The device most responsible for shaping, then reinforcing a short attention span, for changing the manner in which people think about the stuff of life.

The remote control. A small, hand-held link to a television, a CD changer; an innocuous looking, immeasurably potent plastic object.

If you want to understand the future, if you want to know why humans of the next century will think differently, observe the remote control. The scope of its power is inversely proportional to its size.

I have meditated on the remote. I have held one in my hand, felt its transformational energy course through my fingertips, pondered its effect on personal, and collective life.

My remote has allowed me to accelerate the refinement of my teeny attention span. My remote is a parsimonious scalpel, fueled by two AA batteries, cutting every situation and every explanation short, reinventing time, rendering meaning minimal and manageable.

As part of my ongoing social research, I spend a frightful number of hours watching television. Allow me to show you what I mean about the remote. Let's examine a typical two minutes of my viewing and consider what it entails. Let's take a highly-compressed trip across a painfully thin universe. - a universe that grows thinner with each passing moment.

Click.

PBS. An disheveled gent with an untrimmed beard and baggy bib overalls is teaching me everything I need to know about growing bamboo. He is very earnest, ecosensitive.

Click.

A martial arts movie. Blow after blow is landed on vulnerable body parts. Blows that would kill an ordinary man - blows to the crotch and to the head - crash with terrible accuracy. And yet, the victim seems to be okay. No one bleeds. No one gets a hernia.

Click.

Golf. Goofy hats. Out of shape middle class guys with clubs playing a game only out of shape middle class guys would call a "sport."

Click.

Bowling. Goofy shirts. Out of shape lower middle class guys with big. . .

Click.

The development of the "Supercruise" function will make our next generation of jet fighter aircraft deadlier in a dog fight. Good people will have the fastest jet. Evil people will have the slower jet. Yay for our side.

Click.

A commercial from a world where everything is tinted blue and all cars are without dents. This world exists for 15 seconds; then, it is gone.

Click.

Suzanne Somers uses the Torso Track. Suzanne is well into her 40s and look at those abs!

Click.

"Jaws and Claws." Coyotes and wounded prairie dogs. Badgers. The relentless Andes vulture; a beak that can shred the shell of a tortoise like a piece of tissue paper.

Click.

Mexican television. Cristina's Edicion Especial. Midgets do the boogaloo in a dance contest. Dance unites us all, even if we speak different languages.

Click.

Just because they possessed fabulous wealth didn't prevent the Rothchilds and Astors from being wacky, fun-loving folks. Just folks. With gigantic houses.

Click.

NASCAR. Around and around and around and around. Fast, colorful crashes. Car racing for the pro wrestling fan.

Click.

A Navy recruiting ad. Join the armed forces to earn a college degree, to sky dive in your spare time. There is no mention of war.

Click.

Trim the stems off those Shitake mushrooms. The stems are icky.

Click.

A movie about terrorists in Toronto: Mounties versus Islamic fundamentalists. The ultimate showdown in the Great North. Canadians are good. Islamic fundamentalists are evil.

Click.

A cartoon beaver watches a sunset. Animated entities enjoy the beauty of nature. They have feelings too.

Click.

Oops, the local access channel. Self-glorification with a poor soundtrack.

Click.

Spies. Can't live with them, can't live without them. Spies look so normal. They are evil, unless they are one of us.

Click.

The air core self-cooker. Throw in anything - frozen, thawed, raw. . .it doesn't matter. Three hours later, you've got the best meal you've ever eaten. Even better than the one you ate at that little restaurant tucked in the alleyway near the Louvre.

Click.

Direct from factory savings on commercial-grade trimmer mowers. Mow down young trees.

Click.

McAuliffe. Bastogne. "Nuts." Best part of WWII.

Click.

No yolk in the whites, whatever you do.

Click.

Clinton's LDL level is off the charts. The prez needs more exercise. Someone please explain that this means jogging.

Click.

Move over Lenin, we've got a real revolution on our hands. Mr. Nick is so confident about his haircare system he is willing to demonstrate it on his own long, luxurious mane. Even proles can afford the four-week haircare treatment. This is good.

Click.

Mattress City. A whole city.

Click.

Donald Duck's voice has changed. Huey, Dewey and Louie are exactly the same size they were 30 years ago.

Click.

Norwegian flat bread. Three techniques for cooking lefse. Aquavit is aged in old sherry casks sent as deck cargo from Norway to Australia and back.

Click.

Miraculous skin rejuvenator. Several doctors abandoned their practices to bring word of this non-surgical treatment to a desperate world. Why waste time saving lives?

Click.

The cockpit of the ME 109 was extremely cramped, limiting the mobility of even average-sized Luftwaffe pilots.

Click.

There is weather in Kansas, 24-hours per day. The weather is always severe; isolated, but severe.

Click.

A disheveled guy with an untrimmed beard and baggy bib overalls points to a perfect stand of bamboo.

Wow, we're back.

All that information, in two minutes. And it is just the kind of info I need. Digesting the information, in the "real time" of the remote, strengthens my new way of thinking - a cogitative style ideal for next millennium.

As I lie in the dark, I realize the remote control has allowed me to cut the learning process to a matter of milliseconds. It provides me, further, with just the right quality of information: information that suits my emotional needs in an ever-more complex world. By trimming the fat of ambiguity, the remote gives me the ability to see experience as simple, one-dimensional, direct, filled with non-threatening data. The remote is my baton and I am conducting a symphony of comfort.

My remote control is the key to a consciousness that will not, cannot, examine itself or its contents - a consciousness in which consideration of complexity or differences is a trap door leading to the ultimate, scary problem: doubt. Especially the doubt that what I see or believe might be false. If I feel the pressure of doubt, I change the idea back to something that soothes me.

If I speed past events, if data are compressed and easily entertained, I can convince myself that because I understand something, it must be true. I can believe that words written and spoken are crystal-clear clarions of fact. I can ignore the possibility that human perception is a matter of intent and interpretation. I can convince myself that an "objective" perspective, my perspective!, is real. I can ignore the notion that only one body can occupy one spot at one time, and that the way things appear depends on what spot I occupy. The weight is gone from my psychic shoulders.

The remote is the technological facilitator of a cartoon consciousness - a mode of thought that is essential in a world where social, religious, political, ethical and economic ideas are best expressed by T-shirt slogans and bumperstickers, by simple redundant slogans repeated like mantras, voiced again and again, emphatically, inflexibly, like rote lessons delivered to kindergartners; a world in which principles are superhero clear, stunningly simple.

The remote is my range finder in a horizontal world.

With my remote in hand, I am confident, untroubled by useless details and doubt.

Click.

A couple is in a television kitchen. They are talking fast, as though their time-release diet spansules have melted prematurely and kicked in a massive dose. They are putting together a breakfast casserole. Quickly.

Their creation reminds me of a classic strata. I think I'll make a strata when I emerge from the darkness of my bedroom to jet around the disc of an increasingly flat planet on the back of my remote.

I'll take the crusts off some day-old bread. I'll butter a baking dish.

I'll soak the slices of bread with milk and layer the bottom of the baking pan with slices, leaving small gaps between the slices.

Next, I'll saute some onion and mushrooms, with salt and pepper to taste. I'll use Shitake mushrooms and remove the stems. The stems are icky, you know.

I'll cook the melange until the moisture from the fungi evaporates, adding chopped garlic, chopped green chile and crumbled, cooked and drained hot Italian sausage. I'll cover the bread slices with the mix and top the mix with another layer of bread.

On top of the bread and mix I'll pour four or five beaten eggs whisked with a cup and a half of cream, salt and pepper, and minced garlic, then cover it all with a layer of shredded Cheddar cheese. I'll let the mess sit awhile then bake it at 350 until the egg mix cooks, sets, gets poofy and brown - an hour to an hour and a half. More time than I would like, but I will go back to the television and take in plenty of shallow information in the interim.

Click.

The Las Vegas Hot Dice Roller Derby team wears great outfits, but can they play fair? They are evil. The team from Florida is good.

I am going to eat some strata, then call the local nursery.

I need to find some bamboo.

Click.

 

Oldtimers
By John Motter

Visiting West Fork of San Juan

By John M. Motter

Pagosa Country could be called the land of many rivers. Four rivers traverse the countryside. If you count the Little Blanco and Little Navajo as rivers, the number jumps to six. The earliest explorers called Stollsteimer Creek the Nutria River. If we do the same, the number of rivers jumps to seven. Adding to the Piedra's flow is the First Fork, river number eight. Before it climbs into the high mountains, the Piedra splits into the East Fork and Middle Fork. River number nine. Finally, the San Juan has two heads, the East Fork and the West Fork. River number 10.

That Number 10, the West Fork of the San Juan, is the subject of today's oldtimer story. The West Fork and East Fork part company about 10 miles northeast of town. U.S. 160 runs through the valley of the West Fork as it approaches Wolf Creek Pass.

During the early settlement of Pagosa Country, a wagon road crossed Elwood Pass and dropped down the East Fork Valley on its way to Pagosa Springs No such road came down the West Fork Valley. However, when high water closed the canyon at the mouth of the East Fork, pioneers followed a trail starting at the Joe Mann homestead in the East Fork and climbing to Windy Pass before dropping down into the valley of the West Fork and continuing on to Pagosa Springs. In addition, an old trail wound up the San Juan Valley into the West Fork, up Windy Pass, then north across the mountains to South Fork.

No one knows for certain who the first settlers of the West Fork Valley were. Certainly people cut hay from the valley during the closing years of the 1870s and sold the hay to the Army then stationed at Fort Lewis. In those days, Fort Lewis was located in what is now downtown Pagosa Springs.

One of the first settlers in the West Fork Valley was Asa Pangborn, who probably cut hay there for the cavalry horses. Pangborn's homestead certificate was dated 1884, but he probably staked out the property as early as 1879. Pangborn worked in the Summitville mines. At various times, he later lived in Pagosa Springs or Del Norte. Old timers reported his child, Asa Pangborn Jr., as the first white child born in Pagosa Springs. The George Smith family also has a child born during 1879. The Smiths lived about seven miles west of town.

John R. Crump filed a homestead in the valley the same year as Pangborn. The difference between the two pioneers is, we don't know what happened to Crump. Another 1884 West Fork homesteader was E. M. Taylor, who fulfilled a long and useful life in Pagosa Country.

Another early settler in the West Fork Valley was S.J. Berlin, who bought the ranches of Pangborn, Crump and Taylor in 1884. Berlin had been superintendent of the Little Annie mine at Summitville, that community's greatest gold producer. By the late 1880s, Berlin sold out and moved to Utah.

There were probably other settlers in the valley as well, folks who settled awhile, then moved on without leaving a trace. An archaeological study of a portion of the valley turned up evidence of several old, unidentified, log cabins.

Moving into the valley a few years later were the Chapsons, Dutch Henry Born, Humes, Kleckners, McCoys, and the Howe brothers, William and Abe.

Along with Old Joe Mann, the Howe brothers participated in the so-called Archuleta County sheepmen/cattlemen's war during the fall of 1892. The Howe brothers homesteaded a portion of what is now the At Last Ranch. The shootout took place along the river just north of the West Fork bridge. William Howe was an Archuleta County commissioner, but that didn't save his life. He died almost instantly from wounds received from the rifle of Juan de dios Montoya, a San Luis Valley youth driving a herd of sheep across the property. A Durango jury acquitted Montoya, allowing that he acted in self defense.

In earlier years, Dutch Henry had been a buffalo hunter and acquaintance of the likes of Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Dangerous Dave Mather, and Bill Tighlman. After years of frontier adventure, Henry abandoned his adventuresome career and homesteaded what is known today as Born's Lake, married his childhood sweetheart, and settled down to the rather mundane profession of raising trout.

Everyday life on the West Fork must have been challenging in those early days when grizzlies and wolves still roamed at will, law enforcement was a few miles but a lot of horseback hours away, and most work was done by hand.

Before Wolf Creek Pass was built - it officially opened Aug. 21, 1916 - the main road through the West Fork ran up the west side of the river. A secondary road pass through the At Last Ranch and continued to the Chapson Ranch. The bridge across the West Fork was closer to the forks of the two rivers than it is today. As part of the Wolf Creek Pass project, the state moved the main road to the east side of the river where it remains to this day.

Early commerce in the valley consisted of raising hay and cattle. The photos accompanying this article were provided by Kenneth Chapson. The Chapsons raised cattle. The Chapson photos provide a good look at the West Fork Valley around the turn of the century. Family patriarch John A. Chapson came to the West Fork during the late 1890s, driving two covered wagons over Elwood Pass. The old cabin pictured burned in 1905. The Chapsons replaced the building with a finer home, one which has subsequently been moved to Pagosa Springs by Jerry Brinton.

Whit Newton purchased the Chapson Ranch in 1924. Since that time, it has passed through many hands.

 

Music Boosters
By Roy Starling

Gershwin's art is for everyone

By Roy Starling

A lot of us tend to think of art as something stuffy and serious, something that has to be studied in school. Art is supposed to be good for us, but it's like the broccoli we pushed over to the side of our plates when we were kids.

Even as adults, we want movies and books and music that are more burgers and fries than peas and carrots. Writers such as Stephen King, Danielle Steele, Clive Cussler, Dean Koontz and John Grisham are well aware of that, and we've helped make them millionaires.

The American composer George Gershwin was also enormously popular, and he made a bundle cranking out snappy tunes. But he was a gifted musician, a genius some said, so being popular wasn't enough for him.

A contributor to the Larousse Encyclopedia of Music noted that "Gershwin went from rags to riches as a pop composer; he would have given much of his huge fortune to be a serious one. . . . (He) poses the neat problem as to where commercial music stops and serious music begins."

Most music critics agree that Gershwin succeeded in mixing art with his pop, of making pop into art, of lacing his musical burgers with broccoli. Gershwin, musician and critic Jan Swafford said, "remained a true artist who refused to be satisfied with acclaim and riches, but insisted on striving toward an unprecedented unity of commercial and classical genres. Of all those who have tried to achieve such a unity, only he may have had the talent to achieve it."

In those days, it was said that Gershwin was "trying to make a lady out of jazz."

In short, Gershwin's music is art that isn't stuffy. Like his "Porgy and Bess," it's folk and it's opera. It's catchy but complex. It seems simple, but is actually sophisticated. Even regular people like us can appreciate him, people who don't know a measure from a melody, a pricksong from a descant.

What this all means is that the Music Boosters' "S'Wonderful," a Gershwin revue, should be a toe-tappin' good time for anyone who enjoys music. The show runs Friday and Saturday night this weekend at the high school auditorium. Performances begin at 7:30 both nights, and the doors will open at 6 p.m.

Reserved-seating tickets are available at The Wild Hare and Moonlight Books. Tickets, which will also be sold at the door, are $10 for adults, $7 for students and $5 for children under 12.

JoAnn Laird, who is co-directing the revue with Kathy Isberg, says there'll be plenty to enjoy in the show. She predicts one of the favorites will be "Strike Up the Band," which she calls "an exciting number featuring Morgan Gronewoller and the entire 7-piece band."

Another highlight should be the combination of the concert piece "Rhapsody in Blue" and the jazzy "American in Paris" in which "John Graves (piano), Dave Krueger (bass) and Cary Valentine (drums) do their thing," she said.

Laird also said to keep an eye out for "It's Nice Work If You Can Get It," in which Archuleta County High School director Mark DeVoti becomes "the lounge singer of all lounge singers."

Isberg and Laird got a pleasant surprise when 12-year-old tap dancer Elizabeth Wellborn showed up to audition for the show. In order to showcase her talents, "We took a very little known Gershwin song, 'Fidgety Feet,' and built it around her," Laird said.

Gershwin's "Someone to Watch Over Me" will get fine treatment from Music Booster newcomer Tonya Hubbard. "Tonya will knock your socks off," Laird said.

The show's directors are also going to get in on the act. "I'll be singing 'They Can't Take That Away From Me' as a female lounge singer in the Café Cafard," Laird said. Sounds like a classy joint - 'Cafard' is French for cockroach, according to Laird.

Isberg will open up Act Two with "Summertime," one of the Broadway-style songs from "Porgy and Bess."

Laird's work with "S'Wonderful" serves as a tribute to one of her musical heroes. "I fell in love with Gershwin several times just listening to his music," she said. "I'm a jazz aficionado, so I've listened to him all my life. He and Cole Porter are two of my favorites."

As a devotee of Gershwin, Laird is in good company. Swafford called the much loved composer "one of the legendary figures of the century, gifted with phenomenal musical imagination and creative energy."

When Gershwin died of a brain tumor at 38, his friend and fellow composer Arnold Schoenberg wrote, "Music to him was the air he breathed, the food which nourished him, the drink that refreshed him. Music was what made him feel, and music was the feeling he expressed."

This weekend is your time to sample Gershwin's music for yourself. Try it. S'pop. S'art. S'wonderful.

 

Letters

Beyond local voters

Dear Editor,

In 1992 state voters approved Amendment 1, also known as the Tabor Amendment - the Taxpayers Bill of Rights, which became Section 20, Article X of the State Constitution. The thrust of the amendment was to restrain the growth of government, both state and local. To slow government growth and to curtail unwarranted tax increases and to allow voters to retain some control over such growth and taxes, limits were placed on spending and voter approval of taxes was required. Also, the refund of revenue collected beyond those spending limits was mandated. The spending limits allow an increase equal to inflation and local growth each year over the previous year.

Sub-section (7) (d) of section 20 states "if revenue from sources not excluded from fiscal year spending exceeds these limits in dollars for that fiscal year the excess shall be refunded in the next fiscal year unless voters approve a revenue change as an offset." According to a recent ruling by the State Supreme court the offset is to the refund, not to the excess. The excess must be refunded or the voters must approve the retention and spending of the excess. Such approval is the required revenue change to offset the refund. (7) (d) would also seem to require the calculation of the excess each year and to require approval each year to retain and spend the excess rather than make a refund.

Sub-section (3) (a) states "except for petitions, bonded debt, or charter or constitutional provisions, districts may consolidate ballot issues and voters may approve a delay of up to four years in voting on ballot issues. District actions taken during such a delay shall not extend beyond that period." This would seem to allow voters to approve the retention and spending of excess revenue for four years with one vote, but no longer without another vote.

Proposals on the November ballot appear to seek complete elimination of all restraints of the amendment rather than simple approval to keep and spend excess revenue. Approval to keep and spend all excess revenue and other funds collected during "1999 and each subsequent year" and to disregard imposed restraints as indicated by "notwithstanding any restrictions" and "without regard to any spending, revenue raising, or other limitation" contained in Article X, Section 20 of the Colorado Constitution is beyond the authority of local voters.

Fitzhugh Havens

Best in the state

Dear David,

As many of us already know, our Pagosa Springs Library is one of the best in the state. A very high percentage of our citizens have library cards. The library is a tremendous resource for our children's work and entertainment, gives access to research projects for adults (both resident and non-resident) and is an important asset for all of the reading public.

Asking the library to maintain its excellence on revenues dictated by outside forces over which we have no control, is very difficult. Vote for maintaining this excellent facility, not by raising taxes, but by voting to allow us to use our locally-collected monies for what most of us consider a very important use of our taxes.

Sincerely,

Merilyn Moorhead

 

E-mail

East Fork fishing

Dear Editor,

The Piano Creek Ranch developers have attempted to sow confusion recently about the public's fishing rights to the East Fork of the San Juan. Let me offer readers citations directly from the relevant government documents.

The deed to the ranch lands in question, or more properly the United States Patent, was issued as a consequence of a land exchange between Whitney Newton and the U.S. Forest Service in 1943. The U.S. Patent contains boilerplate language reserving rights-of-way for telephone lines, roadways and trails covered by reserved rights-of-way. For that information, one has to look at the underlying documentation.

In this case, there exists several years of correspondence between Newton and the Forest Service about the details of the land exchange. The issue of reserving public fishing access to the East Fork is covered in excruciating detail. For the Forest Service, retaining public fishing rights was a key component in its decision to approve the land exchange.

Whit Newton had no objections to public fishing on the East Fork. In fact, in a Feb. 3, 1940, letter to the Forest Service he found the Forest Service's "clause reserving fishing rights for the public satisfactory."

Keeping fishing access open to the public was critical to the Forest Service. This is clearly indicated by several Forest Service internal memos. For example, an Aug. 20, 1940, letter from Rocky Mountain Regional Forester Allen Peck to the chief of the Forest Service emphasized protecting public fishing rights on the East Fork: "public access to and public uses of these waters for fishing purposes will be provided in perpetuity through adequate reservations in the patent." Later in the same letter, Peck reiterates that "the proposal includes ample provision for the protection of public recreation values."

Legal notice of the proposed land exchange was published in The Pagosa Springs SUN in 1941 and announced to the public that access to the East Fork for fishing would be retained by the Forest Service for the American public.

To put it bluntly, Whitney Newton and the Forest Service made a deal in 1943. From the Forest Service's perspective, keeping public fishing access to the East Fork was a make or break part of the deal. Newton and the Forest Service struck their bargain based on this public fishing access language.

Now, 56 years later, new landowners looking for an exclusive resort have waded into town and immediately reneged on this agreement. A deal's a deal. If Piano Creek Ranch developers won't honor the bargain struck by Whit Newton with the Forest Service that initially allowed Newton to obtain this property in the 1943 land exchange, they should go elsewhere to find their prized security and seclusion.

The question is, will the Forest Service honor its public trust obligations and vigorously defend the public's property rights, in this case fishing access to the East Fork?

Mark Pearson

Durango

Editor's note: Your letter fails to mention what the language on the recorded deed (a relevant government document) says about public access to the private property. It also fails to mention what the environmental impact statement or the revised EIS of the once proposed (and Forest Service approved) East Fork Valley Ski Area stated about public access to the private property involved.

Real issues

Dear Editor,

Through a friend I have heard about and have been reading about the happenings regarding the fight to save the East Fork Valley for future generations. I must say that on one hand I agree with the need to preserve and protect our environment, but on the other hand I realize that the nature of real estate, be it urban or rural, it is all destined to come under pressure from development.

In today's hyperactive go-go Internet world people are searching for a way out. It may be for a quick get away, or a total lifestyle change, but in any case I think that I can speak for a multitude of midwesterners that long to have life in the mountains. Here in the heartland about the only vista to break the horizon is a man-made albeit 100-story skyline. I believe that developers are sensing this and are seeking opportunities to satisfy that craving (i.e. Piano Creek Ranch).

But I think that the real question that we as society need to address when faced with these issues are what are the alternatives?

If we are to seek to save the East Fork Valley for the public, then at what cost? Do we ask the Bill Gateses of the world to come to our rescue?

Does the federal, state, or local government foot the bill? What alternatives do they have for our tax dollars? Schools? Health care?

And if development is going to occur, then to what extent?

It seems as though, from what I have read, that the proposed project will have little overall impact in terms of population masses compared to other ideas.

What if the developer was proposing a full blown Vail-style ski resort? This might bring in thousands or even tens of thousands of people to the area.

While I am not one who has $500K, let alone $500 to plunk down on a vacation home, it seems that the real concern of the "Friends" is an economic class issue.

I guess all I can say is address the real issues. If you don't want development then pass legislation, zoning laws, moratoriums that stop it. If stopping growth isn't the answer, then step back and guide with a careful hand. But remember what the real estate guru's say: 1.) "Buy real estate - 'cause they ain't makin' no more" and 2.)Location, location, location.

It sounds like you all just have the location.

Jonathan Steele

Chicago, Ill.

Friendly nag

Dear Editor,

Can't help a friendly nag at your guest editor who wrote (Oct. 7 editorial) about the media in the singular use of the term "The media is . . ." when as an editor he surely knows the term is the plural of medium. The press is one medium. The media are the press, radio, TV and so on.

Sincerely,

Lee Paige

Homesick again

Dear Editor,

Was feeling a little homesick again and started reading the SUN. Figure I'll be on my way up for the last elk hunt of the season on Oct. 27. Can't wait to get there. Sure do miss it.

Boyd Faulknor Jr.

O'Neal Family

Dear Editor,

We wish to thank all of Nellie's friends who attended her services on such short notice. An extra special "thank you" to the piano player and singers who honored her.

Nellie's family is also larger than mentioned as she has another granddaughter, Mary Elizabeth Waddington, and three great grandchildren, Ashley, David and Ivy Rose who live in Casa Grande, Ariz.

If anyone wishes to e-mail us, our address is willieoneal@hotmail.com.

Gordon and Vernette (Willie) O'Neal.

 

People

Jennifer Cordray

Jennifer Cordray, a senior at Colorado State University, was recently awarded the Association of Golf Merchandisers Scholarship in the amount of $1,000 from the College of Applied Human Sciences. Cordray, a 1996 graduate of Pagosa Springs High School, is majoring in merchandising.

In addition to her studies at CSU, Cordray is a volunteer with the Fort Collins Youth Gold Program as an assistant golf coach. Besides majoring in golf merchandising, to qualify for the scholarship, Cordray had to earn, and must maintain, a 2.5 grade point average. She also had to write an essay addressing her career objectives and a supporting reason as to why she should have been awarded the scholarship.

The Association of Golf Merchandisers program is dedicated to the future of the golf merchandising industry. Besides funding scholarships and grants for students who major in the field, it aims at developing additional golf merchandising educational programs and to fund industry-specific research.

David Holesapple

David Holesapple of Boy Scout Troop 813 of Ignacio will conduct his Eagle Scout service project Saturday at the Ute Campground on U.S. 160 just west of the junction with Colo. 151. Holesapple plans to tear down four out-dated, unsafe fire pits and to build four new fire pits as replacements. He will be working under the supervision of campground manager Becky Taylor.

Natalie Ortega

Natalie Ortega of Pagosa Springs has been accepted as an entrant in the Miss Colorado Teen USA 2000 Pageant. The event will be held in November in Aspen. A 10th grader at Pagosa Springs High School, Natalie is the daughter of Louie Ortega, and Isabel and Jim Webster.

 

Births

Jesse Hunter Laverty

Jesse Hunter Laverty was born Sept. 2, 1999, at Mercy Medical Center in Durango at 1:56 p.m.

He weighed 8 pounds, 12 ounces and was 20 1/4-inches tall. He is welcomed home by his older brothers and sisters, Benellen, Allison, Mason and Johannah Laverty.

His paternal grandparents are Bill and Peggy Laverty of Pagosa. His maternal grandparents are Dan and Maxine Gnazzo of Aurora.

 

Weather Stats

Date

High

Low

Precipitation

Type

Depth

Moisture

10/6

66

25

R

-

.08

10/7

71

31

-

-

-

10/8

73

33

-

-

-

10/9

73

32

-

-

-

10/10

74

31

-

-

-

10/11

74

28

-

-

-

10/12

73

32

-

-

-

After cool weekend, warmer weather returns

By John M. Motter

Big game hunters may want to throw another log on the fire this coming weekend, according to the forecast provided by the National Weather Service.

"An upper level trough sagging down from northwest Canada could cause temperatures to drop by 15 or 20 degrees," said Jim Pringle of the National Weather Service office in Grand Junction. "Lows Sunday morning could be in the upper teens or low 20s."

Indian summer should return by Monday as a high-pressure system elbows back into the area, Pringle said.

Today should be mostly sunny with highs in the 70s, according to Pringle. Tomorrow should be breezy with a slight chance of snow in the higher mountains. Highs should be in the low to mid 70s with lows in the mid 30s.

By Saturday, the low pressure trough carrying cold air from the Gulf of Alaska should arrive. Daytime temperatures should plunge to the 50s, Pringle said. Sunday will remain cool and dry and a warming trend Monday should restore Indian summer conditions.

Indian summer has a specific definition, Pringle said, contained in the National Weather Service glossary of meteorology prepared by the American Meteorological Society.

"Indian summer occurs during mid to late autumn," Pringle said, "following a killing frost. It is characterized by warmer than normal days, clear or sometimes hazy skies, and cool nights. Indian summer doesn't occur every year. Some years more than one Indian summer occurs."

The term Indian summer is more commonly used in the northeastern states, according to Pringle, and dates back to at least 1878. It may have originated to describe how Indians took advantage of the respite from cold to lay in more provisions.

"In Europe, the equivalent condition is called Old Wives Summer," Pringle said. "In England, it's called St. Martin's or St. Luke's, or Allhallowen Summer."

Meanwhile, over the past two weeks Pagosa Country folks have enjoyed relatively warm days and nights with little precipitation. So far during October, only 0.08 inches of precipitation have been recorded. The September precipitation total was 1.96 inches, very close to the long-time September average precipitation of 1.89 inches.

September's high temperature was 77 degrees, recorded Sept. 11. The low September temperature was 23 degrees recorded Sept. 28. The thermometer dropped below freezing five times during September. The first freezing temperature of the fall season was Sept. 20 when a low of 31 degrees was recorded.

Based on historical records, October should bring 2.03 inches of precipitation, 2.9 inches of snow, an average mean temperature of 45.4 degrees, an average mean high temperature of 72.1, and an average mean low temperature of 26.5 degrees. The extreme high temperature for October is 85 degrees, and the extreme low temperature is 5 degrees.